Joe Shaute

Joseph Benjamin Shaute (August 1, 1899 in Peckville, Pennsylvania – February 21, 1970 in Scranton, Pennsylvania) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He pitched from 1922 to 1934, and during his 13-year career, he played primarily for the Cleveland Indians.[1] He attended Juniata College and Mansfield University of Pennsylvania.

He made his major league debut in September 1922, and threw his first pitch to legendary swatter Babe Ruth.[1] Baseball historian William C. Kashatus noted that when Shaute came to the pitching mound, "the Indians were clinging to a one-run lead in the bottom of the eighth with two outs and bases loaded with Yankees".[1] Shaute gained notoriety when he struck out Ruth on four pitches to end the inning.[1] In the following inning, he faced another powerful hitter, Bob Meusel, who "swung so hard on Shaute's first offering that he whirled completely around and fell to the ground".[1] The pitcher next struck out Yankee catcher Freddie Hoffman.[1] Kashatus observed that Shaute "continued to dominate Ruth for the next three years".[1]

The situation changed in 1927, however, when Ruth hit 60 home runs, setting a major league record that stood for more than seven decades.[1] Ruth hit three of those home runs—numbers 30, 40, and 52—off of Shaute.[1] Nevertheless, during his 13-season career, Shaute struck out Ruth on more than 30 occasions.[1]

Shaute enjoyed his best season in 1924, "when he won 20 games for the lowly Indians who finished sixth that year".[1]

Joe Shaute
Shaule, Cleveland, 1924 LOC npcc.11166
Pitcher
Born: August 1, 1899
Peckville, Pennsylvania
Died: February 21, 1970 (aged 70)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
July 6, 1922, for the Cleveland Indians
Last MLB appearance
May 24, 1934, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Win–loss record99–109
Earned run average4.15
Strikeouts512
Teams

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Kashatus (2002), p. 99.

References

  • Kashatus, William C. (2002). Diamonds in the Coalfields: 21 Remarkable Baseball Players, Managers, and Umpires from Northeast Pennsylvania. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. ISBN 978-0-7864-1176-4.

External links

1922 Cleveland Indians season

The 1922 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 78–76, 16 games behind the New York Yankees.

1923 Cleveland Indians season

The 1923 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 82–71, 16½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1924 Cleveland Indians season

The 1924 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 67–86, ​24 1⁄2 games behind the Washington Senators.

1925 Cleveland Indians season

The 1925 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 70–84, ​27 1⁄2 games behind the Washington Senators.

1926 Cleveland Indians season

The 1926 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 88–66, 3 games behind the New York Yankees.

1927 Cleveland Indians season

The 1927 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the American League with a record of 66–87, 43½ games behind the New York Yankees.

1927 New York Yankees season

The 1927 New York Yankees season was their 25th season. The team finished with a record of 110–44, winning their fifth pennant and finishing 19 games ahead of the Philadelphia Athletics and were tied for first or better for the whole season. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they swept the Pittsburgh Pirates. This Yankees team was known for their feared lineup, which was nicknamed "Murderers' Row", and is widely considered to be the greatest baseball team in MLB history.

1928 Cleveland Indians season

The 1928 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the American League with a record of 62–92, 39 games behind the New York Yankees.

1929 Cleveland Indians season

The 1929 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the American League with a record of 81–71, 24 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1930 Cleveland Indians season

The 1930 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the American League with a record of 81–73, 21 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics.

1931 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1931 Brooklyn Robins finished in 4th place, after which longtime manager Wilbert Robinson announced his retirement with 1,375 career victories.

1932 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1932 Brooklyn Dodgers season was the first season the franchise was officially known as the Dodgers, with the name making its first appearance on some of the team's jerseys. The Dodgers nickname had in use since the 1890s and was used interchangeably with other nicknames in media reports, particularly "Robins" in reference to longtime manager Wilbert Robinson. With Robinson's retirement after the 1931 season and the arrival of Max Carey, the nickname "Robins" was no longer used. The team wound up finishing the season in third place.

1933 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1933 Brooklyn Dodgers finished in 6th place. After the season, manager Max Carey was fired and replaced by coach Casey Stengel.

1934 Brooklyn Dodgers season

Casey Stengel took over as manager for the 1934 Brooklyn Dodgers, but the team still finished in 6th place.

1934 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1934 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 52–99, 42 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals. Their .344 winning percentage remains the lowest in franchise history since 1900, and the 99 losses were the worst in the franchise history until the 1982 Reds lost 101 games. Because the schedule did not have 162 games at this time, and the Reds only won 52 games this season compared to 1982, when they lost 101 games, when at the same time winning 61 games, nine more than this team, the 1934 Reds are actually a weaker team than the 1982 team, thus making this team the worst in franchise history overall.

Blakely, Pennsylvania

Blakely is a borough in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 6,564 at the 2010 census.

The Lackawanna River flows through the borough of Blakely, and within the borough is the village of Peckville.

Intentional base on balls

In baseball, an intentional base on balls, usually referred to as an intentional walk and denoted in baseball scorekeeping by IBB, is a walk issued to a batter by a pitcher with the intent of removing the batter's opportunity to swing at the pitched ball. A pitch that is intentionally thrown far outside the strike zone for this purpose is referred to as an intentional ball.

Beginning with the 2017 season, Major League Baseball has removed the requirement to throw four intentional balls. In MLB and in amateur baseball, such as high school and college games, and in most levels of Little League Baseball, the manager of the team on the field now simply asks the plate umpire to let the batter go to first base.

List of Cleveland Indians Opening Day starting pitchers

The Cleveland Indians are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Cleveland, Ohio. They play in the American League Central division. The first game of the new baseball season is played on Opening Day, and being named the starter that day is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. Since joining the league in 1901, the Indians have used 58 different Opening Day starting pitchers which includes the Opening Day starting pitchers from the Bluebirds and the Naps. They have a record of 58 wins and 54 losses in their Opening Day games.The Indians have played in three different home ball parks, League Park from 1901 through 1946, Cleveland Stadium from 1932 to 1993, and Progressive Field since 1994. From 1934 through 1946 some games were played at League Park and some at Cleveland Stadium. They had a record of 11 wins and 4 losses in Opening Day games at League Park, 9 wins and 13 losses at Cleveland Stadium and 2 wins and 4 losses at Progressive Field, for a total home record in Opening Day games of 22 wins and 21 losses. Their record in Opening Day away games is 35 wins and 35 losses.Bob Feller has the most Opening Day starts for the Indians, with seven. Stan Coveleski had six Opening Day starts for the Indians, Bob Lemon and CC Sabathia each had five Opening Day starts, and Addie Joss, Willie Mitchell, Gaylord Perry and Charles Nagy each had four. Several Baseball Hall of Famers have made Opening Day starts for the Indians, including Feller, Coveleski, Lemon, Joss, Gaylord Perry, Dennis Eckersley and Early Wynn. Brothers Jim Perry and Gaylord Perry each made Opening Day starts for the Indians. Jim Perry started on Opening Day in 1961 and Gaylord Perry made Opening Day starts in 1972, 1973, 1974 and 1975.The Indians have played in the World Series six times. They won in 1920 and 1948, and lost in 1954, 1995, 1997, and 2016. Coveleski was the Opening Day starting pitcher in 1920, Feller in 1948, Wynn in 1954, Dennis Martínez in 1995, Nagy in 1997, and Corey Kluber. The Indians are five and one in Opening Day games in those seasons, with the only loss coming in 2016. The Indians and the Toronto Blue Jays currently hold the record for the longest Opening Day game in Major League history. They set that record on Opening Day 2012, when the game lasted 16 innings. This broke the previous record of 15 innings between the Indians and the Detroit Tigers in 1960.

Mansfield University of Pennsylvania

Mansfield University of Pennsylvania is a small public university in Mansfield, Pennsylvania. It is one of the fourteen state universities that are part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). The university is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and numerous national professional organizations. Mansfield University's total enrollment is 1,637 students.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.