Joe Page

Joseph Francis Page (October 28, 1917 – April 21, 1980), nicknamed Fireman and The Gay Reliever,[1] was a Major League Baseball relief pitcher. Page, who was left-handed, played with the New York Yankees from 1944 to 1950 and with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954.

Joe Page
Joe Page
Pitcher
Born: October 28, 1917
Cherry Valley, Pennsylvania
Died: April 21, 1980 (aged 62)
Latrobe, Pennsylvania
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 19, 1944, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
May 25, 1954, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
MLB statistics
Win–loss record57–49
Earned run average3.53
Strikeouts519
Saves76
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

Page was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. After spending time in the Yankees farm system, Page made his Major League Baseball debut on April 19, 1944 where he began his career as a starter.

In his rookie season (starting 16 games, and relieving in three others), Page was voted to play in the All-Star Game and ended his season with over 100 innings pitched and a 4.56 ERA.[1] The next season, Page suffered a shoulder injury, which led him to start only nine of the twenty games he pitched. That season, Page improved his ERA to 2.82, along with a 6–3 record.

In 1946, Page split his time between closing and starting games, and he picked up three saves while posting a 3.57 ERA and a 9–8 record. In 1947, Page spent practically the whole season in the bullpen and only started twice. He was voted to play in the All-Star Game once again, because of his 2.48 ERA and a 14–8 record.[1] He also led the American League with 17 saves this season. (Note that the save statistic was not an official baseball statistic until 1969, and had not even entered common usage until well after Page did this; this feat is something that is only retroactively appreciated.[2] However, it was certainly appreciated at the time that Page played a greater than average role as the Yankees relief pitcher, at a time when there was no generally acknowledged "closing pitcher" role in baseball, and when starting pitchers were more often expected to finish complete games.)

His fourteen relief wins in 1947 was an American League record until Luis Arroyo broke it in 1961. He was fourth in the league in American League MVP voting. In the seventh game of the 1947 World Series he earned the save by inducing Brooklyn Dodgers hitter Eddie Miksis to hit into a series-ending double play.

In 1948, Page finished second in the American League in saves. He also struck out 77 in 107.7 innings, pitched in the All-Star game for the third time, and led the league with 55 appearances.[1]

The following season, Page had a 13–8 record and a 2.59 ERA. He finished first in the American League in saves with 27, again with no fanfare at the time because the save was not a recognized baseball statistic. He gave up 103 hits in 135.3 innings and struck out 99 batters. He was again named to play in the All-Star Game, and finished first in the league in three categories: games finished, games pitched, and saves. Page won the inaugural Babe Ruth Award for his performance in the 1949 World Series against the Brooklyn Dodgers, winning game three of the Series.[1] He also finished third in the American League MVP voting.

Page struggled during the 1950 season and was not part of the Yankee playoff roster. He was sent to the minors for the 1951 season, and was released on May 16. He spent 1952 in the minors, and was out of baseball altogether in 1953. On April 12, 1954, Page was signed as a free agent by the Pittsburgh Pirates, appearing in seven games, posting an 11.17 ERA. Page was released by the Pirates on June 1, one week after his final appearance.

Page finished his eight-year career in the majors with a career record of 57–49, a 3.53 ERA, 76 saves, and 519 strikeouts in 790.0 innings pitched.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Harvey Frommer. A Yankees Century, A Celebration of the First Hundred Years of Baseball's Greatest Team. The Berkley Publishing Group. pp. 200–201. ISBN 0-425-18617-2.
  2. ^ Newman, Mark (July 22, 2008). "Holtzman helped 'save' baseball". MLB.com. Archived from the original on October 6, 2011.

External links

Preceded by
None
Babe Ruth Award
1949
Succeeded by
Jerry Coleman
1944 New York Yankees season

The 1944 New York Yankees season was the team's 42nd season in New York, and its 44th season overall. The team finished in third place in the American League with a record of 83–71, finishing 6 games behind the St. Louis Browns. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1945 New York Yankees season

The 1945 New York Yankees season was the team's 43rd season in New York and its 45th overall. The team finished in fourth place in the American League with a record of 81–71, finishing 6.5 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1946 New York Yankees season

The 1946 New York Yankees season was the team's 44th season in New York, and its 46th overall. The team finished with a record of 87–67, finishing 17 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy, Bill Dickey, and Johnny Neun. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1947 Brooklyn Dodgers season

On April 15, Jackie Robinson was the opening day first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers, becoming the first black player in Major League Baseball. Robinson went on to bat .297, score 125 runs, steal 29 bases and be named the very first African-American Rookie of the Year. The Dodgers won the National League title and went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1947 World Series. This season was dramatized in the movie 42.

1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 14th playing of the "Midsummer Classic" between Major League Baseball's (MLB) American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams. The All-Star Game was held on July 8, 1947, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, the home of the NL's Chicago Cubs.

The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League by a score of 2–1 in 2 hours and 19 minutes.

1947 New York Yankees season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was the team's 45th season in New York, and its 47th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 15th pennant, finishing 12 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. It was the first ever season of the Yankees to be broadcast live on television with WABD providing the television broadcast feed to viewers in the city.

1947 World Series

The 1947 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Yankees won the Series in seven games for their first title since 1943, and their eleventh World Series championship in team history. Yankees manager Bucky Harris won the Series for the first time since managing the Washington Senators to their only title in 1924.

In 1947, Jackie Robinson, a Brooklyn Dodger, desegregated major league baseball. For the first time in World Series history, a racially integrated team played.

1948 New York Yankees season

The 1948 New York Yankees season was the team's 46th season in New York and its 48th overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 2.5 games behind the Cleveland Indians and 1.5 games behind the second-place Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

The fractional games-behind came about due to the frenzied pennant race, which saw the Yankees, Red Sox and Indians all battling it out to the end. The Yankees fell just a little short, and the Red Sox and Indians finished in a tie for first at 96–58. They held a one-game playoff, which counted as part of the regular season, so the Indians' victory raised their record to 97–58, and dropped the Red Sox to 96–59.

The Yankees did not renew Bucky Harris' contract after the season, opting instead to hire Casey Stengel starting in 1949. This move raised some eyebrows, but Stengel had just led the Oakland Oaks to the Pacific Coast League pennant in 1948, demonstrating that with good talent, he had a good chance to succeed. The Yankees were about to begin the most dominating stretch of their long dynasty.

1949 Major League Baseball season

The 1949 Major League Baseball season.

1949 New York Yankees season

The 1949 New York Yankees season was the team's 47th season in New York, and its 49th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 16th pennant, finishing 1 game ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel in his first year. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

1949 World Series

The 1949 World Series featured the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in five games for their second defeat of the Dodgers in three years, and the twelfth championship in team history. This victory would start a record run of five consecutive World Series championships by the Yankees, and was also the first of 14 AL pennants in 16 years (1949–1964 except for 1954 and 1959) for the Yankees.

Both teams finished the regular season with exactly the same records and winning their respective leagues by exactly one game.

1950 New York Yankees season

The 1950 New York Yankees season was the 48th season for the team in New York and its 50th overall as a franchise. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 17th pennant, finishing 3 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. In the World Series, they defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in 4 games. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

Babe Ruth Award

The Babe Ruth Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball (MLB) player with the best performance in the postseason. The award, created in honor of Babe Ruth, was first awarded in 1949 to the MVP of the World Series, one year after Ruth's death. The award was created by the New York City chapter of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA). It continued to be awarded exclusively for performances in the World Series until 2007, when the New York chapter of the BBWAA changed the award to cover the entire postseason. Though it is older than the World Series Most Valuable Player Award, which was not created until 1955 (as the "SPORT Magazine Award"), the Babe Ruth Award is considered less prestigious, because it is not sanctioned by MLB and is awarded several weeks after the World Series.MLB expanded its postseason to include the League Championship Series (LCS) in 1969, the League Division Series (LDS) in 1995, and the Wild Card round in 2012. The Wild Card round is a one-game playoff, the LDS follows a best-of-five playoff format, and the LCS and World Series follow a best-of-seven playoff format. The most recent World Series champions are the Boston Red Sox, who won the 2018 World Series. David Price was named recipient of the Babe Ruth Award.Ruth was a noted slugger who batted .326 with 15 home runs and three wins in three games started as a pitcher during World Series play. However, the Babe Ruth Award does not only go to sluggers or pitchers. Dick Green won the award for the 1974 World Series, in which he batted 0-for-13, but helped the Oakland Athletics win the series with his defense.Joe Page of the New York Yankees was the first winner of the Babe Ruth Award, and Jonathan Papelbon of the Boston Red Sox was the first winner since the award criteria changed to cover the entire postseason. In all, members of the Yankees have won the award sixteen times. Luis Tiant is the only winner of the Babe Ruth Award to play for the World Series–losing team. Two players, Sandy Koufax and Jack Morris, have won the award twice.

Butler Tigers

The Butler Tigers were a Pennsylvania State Association (1935–1942) and Middle Atlantic League (1946–1951) baseball team based in Butler, Pennsylvania. The team was founded in 1935, as the Butler Indians, an affiliate of the Cleveland Indians. They began their affiliation with the New York Yankees the following season, as the Butler Yankees.

They lasted ten seasons as the Yankees, and won league championships in five of those years. The first two came in 1937 and 1938 under manager Ernie Jenkins. The next two occurred in 1940 and 1941 under Thomas Kain and the third occurred in 1942 under Dallas Warren. In 1949 the team became the Butler Tigers, as an affiliate of the Detroit Tigers. In 1951, the team became an affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates.Notable players include Bob Grim, Joe Page, Hank Sauer and Hall of Famer Whitey Ford.

Hardin Bridge

The Hardin Bridge is a bridge in Hardin, Illinois that carries Illinois Route 16 and Illinois Route 100 across the Illinois River. The bridge is the southernmost bridge on the river. It is also one of three crossings used by IL 100, the other two being in Florence and Beardstown. The bridge's western abutment is the western terminus of IL 16. It was built in 1930 and rehabilitated in 2003-04.

Illinois Route 16

Illinois Route 16 is an east–west highway in central Illinois. Its western terminus is at the Joe Page Bridge over the Illinois River in Hardin, while its eastern terminus is at Paris at Illinois Route 1 and U.S. Route 150, with Illinois Route 133. This is a distance of 174.66 miles (281.09 km).

List of Major League Baseball annual saves leaders

The following is a list of annual leaders in saves in Major League Baseball (MLB), with separate lists for the American League and the National League. The list also includes several professional leagues and associations that were never part of MLB.

In baseball, a save is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under prescribed circumstances. Most commonly a relief pitcher ("reliever") earns a save by entering in the ninth inning of a game in which his team is winning by three or fewer runs and finishing the game by pitching one inning without losing the lead. The statistic was created by Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an MLB official statistic in 1969. The save has been retroactively measured for pitchers before that date.

MLB recognizes the player or players in each league with the most saves each season. In retrospect, the five saves by Jack Manning meant he led the National League in its inaugural year, while Bill Hoffer was the American League's first saves champion with three. Mordecai Brown was the first pitcher to record at least 10 saves in a season. Dan Quisenberry, Bruce Sutter, Firpo Marberry, and Ed Walsh are the only pitchers to lead the league in saves five times (though Marberry and Walsh did so before 1969). Sutter is also tied with Harry Wright, Dan Quisenberry and Craig Kimbrel for the most consecutive seasons leading the league in saves with four.

Port Davey

Port Davey is an oceanic inlet located in the south west region of Tasmania, Australia.

Port Davey was named in honour of Thomas Davey, a former Governor of Tasmania. Port Davey is contained within the Port Davey/Bathurst Harbour Marine Nature Reserve, the Melaleuca to Birchs Inlet Important Bird Area and the Southwest National Park, part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.

WKEI

WKEI (1450 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a News/Talk format. Licensed to Kewanee, Illinois, United States, the station serves the Quad Cities area. The station is currently owned by Fletcher M. Ford’s Virden Broadcasting Corp.The station provided the town with its first local radio signal. WKEI is now a news/talk radio station, a Fox News affiliate and home to syndicated talk show hosts Joe Page, Hugh Hewitt and Jim Bohannon. WKEI is also the Kewanee affiliate for Chicago Cubs MLB baseball team.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.