Joe Jacoby

Joseph Erwin Jacoby (born July 6, 1959) is a former American football offensive lineman for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL), where he won three Super Bowls during his tenure with the team. Many Redskins' fans and analysts consider Jacoby the greatest Redskins player not currently inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Joe Jacoby
No. 66
Position:Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:July 6, 1959 (age 59)
Louisville, Kentucky
Height:6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)
Weight:295 lb (134 kg)
Career information
High school:Louisville (KY) Western
College:Louisville
Undrafted:1981
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:170
Games started:148
Touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

Jacoby started off as an offensive tackle for the University of Louisville from 1978 to 1980.[1]

Professional career

After college, Jacoby went undrafted. He signed a free agent contract with the Washington Redskins in 1981, where he embarked on an enviable career—four Super Bowl appearances, of which his team won three (XVII in 1983, XXII in 1988, and XXVI in 1992), plus four consecutive Pro Bowl selections from 1983 to 1986.

Along with Jeff Bostic, Mark May, George Starke and Russ Grimm, Jacoby was a founding member of the Redskins' renowned "Hogs" offensive line of the 1980s and early 1990s (deemed one of the best front fives of NFL history), which was a mainstay of the Redskins' glory years during the first Joe Gibbs era.[2][3]

Jacoby was the lead blocker on John Riggins' famous touchdown run which ensured the Redskins' Super Bowl XVII win over the Dolphins in 1983. In that game, the Redskins set a Super Bowl record for most rushing yards with 276. The Hogs helped the Redskins break that record five years later in Super Bowl XXII, in which Washington trampled over the Denver Broncos with 280 rushing yards en route to the second of the Redskins' three championships.

Personal

One year after the Redskins' third Super Bowl victory in 1992, Jacoby hung up his cleats and retired, after which he became the owner of an auto dealership in Warrenton, Virginia. He no longer owns the dealership as of February, 2008.[4]

Jacoby became an Assistant Football Coach at Shenandoah University in Winchester, Virginia. He began as a part-time volunteer in 2008 and was hired as a full-time employee in 2009.[5]

In 2014, Jacoby was hired as the Offensive Line Coach for Concordia University Chicago.[6]

He has a wife, Irene, and 2 daughters.

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-09-10. Retrieved 2011-08-31.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Joe Jacoby - Washington Redskins Legend". Thehogs.net. 1959-07-06. Retrieved 2017-01-04.
  3. ^ "The History of The Hogs". Thehogs.net. Retrieved 2017-01-04.
  4. ^ http://www.warrentonvirginia.org/?p=488
  5. ^ Joe Jacoby. "Shenandoah". Suhornets.com. Retrieved 2017-01-04.
  6. ^ "This article is unavailble". Yardbarker.com. Retrieved 2017-01-04.
1983 All-Pro Team

The 1983 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1983. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The NEA chose two inside linebackers for the first time, as a reflection of the 3-4 which was the common alignment for NFL defenses in the mid-1980s.

1984 All-Pro Team

The 1984 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1984. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1984 the Pro Football Writers Association chose only one defensive tackle and two inside linebackers in a pure 3-4 format. Pro Football Weekly added a "Special Teams" player, a non-returner who excelled in special teams play.

1984 Pro Bowl

The 1984 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 34th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1983 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1984, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,445. The final score was NFC 45, AFC 3.

Chuck Knox of the Seattle Seahawks led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by San Francisco 49ers head coach Bill Walsh. The referee was Jerry Seeman.Joe Theismann of the Washington Redskins was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1985 Washington Redskins season

The 1985 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 54th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 49th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 11–5 record from 1984 and finshed 10-6. The biggest moment of the year occurred on a November 18 Monday Night Football game, which witnessed Joe Theismann's career-ending injury after a sack by New York Giants outside linebacker Lawrence Taylor. The tackle resulted in a serious leg injury, and Theismann never played in the NFL again. Though the team failed to make the playoffs, they remained in contention for the entire regular season.

1986 Pro Bowl

The 1986 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 36th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1985 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 2, 1986, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,101. The final score was NFC 28, AFC 24.Don Shula of the Miami Dolphins led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach John Robinson. The referee was Bob McElwee.Phil Simms of the New York Giants was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1986 Washington Redskins season

The 1986 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 55th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 51st in Washington, D.C.. The team improved on their 10–6 record from 1985 and returned to the playoffs after missing them the previous year, finishing with a 12–4 record, a second place finish in the NFC East, and qualified for the playoffs as a wild card. They defeated the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC Wild Card Game at RFK Stadium, then upset the defending champion Chicago Bears in the Divisional Playoffs. The season came to an end in the NFC Championship Game when the Redskins were defeated by their division rivals, the New York Giants.

1987 All-Pro Team

The 1987 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1987. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1987 NEA went with a 3-4 format for their All-Pro defense.

1987 Pro Bowl

The 1987 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 37th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1986 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1987, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,101. The final score was AFC 10, NFC 6.Marty Schottenheimer of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Washington Redskins head coach Joe Gibbs. The referee was Dick Jorgensen.Reggie White of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning AFC team received $10,000 apiece while the NFC participants each took home $5,000.

1988 Washington Redskins season

The 1988 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 57th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 53rd in Washington, D.C. They failed to improve on their 11–4 record from 1987, when they won Super Bowl XXII and finished 7-9. The Redskins failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time since 1985. They were the seventh team in NFL history to enter a season as the defending Super Bowl champion and miss the playoffs.The Week 8 meeting against Green Bay at Lambeau Field would be the two teams' final meeting for 13 years.

1989 Washington Redskins season

The 1989 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 58th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 53rd in Washington, D.C. They improved on their 7–9 record from 1988 to 10-6 in 1989, finishing third in the NFC East. However, they failed to qualify for the playoffs for a second consecutive season.

1990 Washington Redskins season

The 1990 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 59th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 54th in Washington, D.C.. The team matched on their 10–6 record from 1989, this time it was enough to earn them' their first playoff appearance since 1987. The Redskins season ended when they fell to the San Francisco 49ers 28–10 in the Divisional Playoffs.

1992 Washington Redskins season

The 1992 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 61st season in the National Football League. This season began with the team trying to win their second Super Bowl in a row, following Super Bowl XXVI.

The Redskins finished with a record of nine wins and seven losses, but still made the 1992–93 NFL playoffs. Nonetheless, a lean period for the Redskins was to follow; they were not to make the postseason again until the 1999 season and have since never seriously contended for another Super Bowl despite five more playoff appearances.

This season would be Joe Gibbs' final season coaching the Washington Redskins until he returned in the 2004 season. Gibbs was the most successful coach in Redskins history, leading the team to three Super Bowl victories (1982, 1987, 1991), and eight playoff berths in eleven seasons (1981-1992).

1993 Washington Redskins season

The 1993 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 62nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 57th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 9–7 record from 1992. Head coach Joe Gibbs retired following the 1992 season and the Redskins promoted his defensive coordinator, Richie Petitbon, to be the head coach. The Redskins’ aging core struggled with injuries while numerous key players (Gary Clark, Wilber Marshall, Martin Mayhew, Jumpy Geathers, and Fred Stokes) left the team via free agency. Management tried to ease the losses by signing players like Carl Banks, Tim McGee, Al Noga, and Rick Graf, but none had a major impact on the team. The team finished the season with a 4–12 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1989. Petitbon was fired at the end of the season.

It was the only season in Redskins history where no player was selected to the Pro Bowl.

Counter run

In American football, a counter run is a running play in which the running back will take a step in the opposite direction of the play, only to get the handoff in the other direction. Weak side linemen will sometimes pull and lead the back downfield (sometimes called a counter trap), but not necessarily. The play is designed to get the defense to flow away from the action for a few steps, allowing better blocking angles for the offensive line, and more room for the running back. The purpose of the counter run is to keep defenses honest and prevent them from easily being able to pursue the play aggressively. It is most effective against defenses that tend to overpursue and can be used on its own to potentially produce a big running play against defenses that get out of position and fail to stay home.

George Starke

George Lawrence Starke (born July 18, 1948) is a former American football offensive lineman who played for the Washington Redskins in the National Football League (NFL) from 1972-84.

After graduating from Columbia College, Starke was drafted by the Washington Redskins and appeared with the Redskins in two Super Bowls 1982 and 1983, helping them win Super Bowl XVII.

Starke's professional football career lasted thirteen years and, at the time of his retirement, Starke had been captain of the Redskins for five years. He was named one of the 70 greatest players in Redskins history.The 6'5", 255-pound Starke was known by many as the "Head Hog" of "The Hogs," the Redskins' famous offensive line which also included Russ Grimm, Don Warren, Rick Walker, Mark May, Joe Jacoby and Jeff Bostic. The Hogs stayed together with a few other later additions nearly a decade after Starke's retirement in 1984.

Following his retirement from professional football, Starke attended Ford Motors Dealer Operations School and opened "George Starke Ford" in Emmitsburg, Maryland. At the same time, he launched a career in television broadcasting.

In 1997, Starke founded the "Excel Institute" in Washington, D.C., a not-for profit adult education vocational training school for at risk individuals above the age of sixteen. After graduating over 500 students trained as auto technicians, Starke retired from the Institute on October 1, 2010.

Starke's other endeavors include "Head Hog BBQ" restaurants in Bethesda, Maryland and Rockville, Maryland named after the famous Washington Redskins offensive line of which he was the senior member.

Following his retirement from the Institute, Starke started Starke Communications, a communications firm that provides communications, public relations and marketing services to corporate clients.

Jeff Bostic

Jeffrey Lynn Bostic (born September 18, 1958) is a former American football offensive lineman who played for the Washington Redskins in the National Football League (NFL).

Ken Huff

Kenneth Wayne Huff (born February 21, 1953) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League. He was also an All-American guard at the University of North Carolina.

Pittsburgh Mayoral Chief of Staff

The Pittsburgh Mayoral Chief of Staff is the senior advisor, strategic planner and "gatekeeper" to the Mayor of Pittsburgh of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Dan Gilman 2018-present (serving Bill Peduto)

Kevin Acklin 2014-2018 (serving Bill Peduto)

Yarone Zober 2006-2014 (serving Luke Ravenstahl)

Dick Skrinjar 2006 (serving Bob O'Connor)

Tom Cox 1994-2006 (serving Thomas J. Murphy, Jr.)

George Whitmer ?-1994 (serving Sophie Masloff)

Joe Mistick 1989-? (serving Sophie Masloff)

Joe Jacoby 1977-1989 (serving Richard Caliguiri & Sophie Masloff)

Bruce Campbell 1970-1977 (serving [{Peter F. Flaherty}]

Burrell Cohen ?-November 27, 1968 (serving Joseph M. Barr)

David Kurtzman ?-1959 (serving David L. Lawrence)

John P. Robin ?-1955 (serving Con Scully & David Lawrence)

The Hogs (American football)

The Hogs were the offensive line of the Washington Redskins of the National Football League during the 1980s and early 1990s. Renowned for their ability to control the line of scrimmage, the Hogs helped the Redskins win three Super Bowl championships (XVII, XXII and XXVI) under head coach Joe Gibbs.

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