Joe DeLamielleure

Joseph Michael DeLamielleure (/dəˌlɑːməˈlɔːr/ də-LAH-mə-LOR; born March 16, 1951) is a former American football offensive lineman who was an All-American at Michigan State. He was selected by the Buffalo Bills in the first round of the 1973 NFL Draft. He won All-Rookie Honors, after finding out a physical condition with his irregular heartbeat was not serious. In 1973 the Buffalo Bills rushing offense led the NFL in yards, yards per carry, as well as rushing touchdowns. He is also the first living NFL player to be tested and diagnosed with CTE (Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy).

Joe DeLamielleure
refer to caption
Delamielleure's bust in the Pro Football Hall Of Fame.
No. 68, 64
Position:Offensive guard
Personal information
Born:March 16, 1951 (age 68)
Detroit, Michigan
Career information
High school:Center Line (MI) St. Clement
College:Michigan State
NFL Draft:1973 / Round: 1 / Pick: 26
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:185
Games started:178
Fumble recoveries:7
Player stats at NFL.com
Career Arena statistics
Tackles:2
Player stats at PFR
Player stats at ArenaFan.com

Playing career

DeLamielleure was perhaps the central figure in the "Electric Company," the Bills' offensive line that paved the way for O. J. Simpson to rush for 2,003 yards in 1973, the first player ever to break that barrier, and the only player ever to do so in a 14-game schedule.[1]

The league leading rushing yardage mark of 3,088 yards is still the 14-game record. Only the 1978 New England Patriots have bettered that mark and did it in 16 games. Individually, Simpson led the NFL in all four major rushing categories. He also had the longest run in the NFL. The 2,003 yards Simpson rushed for is still the 14 game record (Eric Dickerson, Barry Sanders, Terrell Davis, Jamal Lewis, Chris Johnson and Adrian Peterson achieved their marks in 16 games). DeLamielleure was also on the kickoff return team that blocked for Wallace Francis, who led NFL with two return touchdowns. DeLamielleure played on the wedge of the kickoff return team his entire career in Buffalo.

The following year, 1974, the Bills improved to 9–5 and made the playoffs. DeLamielleure was voted second-team All-Pro. In 1975 the Bills displayed one of the most potent offenses of the decade. They led the NFL in eleven categories, including total offense, rushing, rushing average, points, touchdowns and touchdown passes en route to an 8–6 record. The offensive line also allowed the fewest sacks in AFC. Simpson, behind the "Electric Company" achieves his second "quadruple crown" in three years and also had the longest run in NFL. Individually, DeLamielleure is named First-team All-Pro.

  • 1976: Simpson again leads NFL in rushing and DeLamielleure is named First-team All-Pro.
  • 1977: With Simpson injured at mid-season, Bills pass more often and lead NFL in Passing Yards and throw the most passes in NFL.
  • 1978: With Simpson traded, Bills running back Terry Miller takes over and is 9th in the NFL in rushing.

Six times he was named All-Pro and was named to the Pro Bowl six times. In 1975, he was named by the NFLPA as Offensive Lineman of the Year. In 1973, he was Co-Offensive Linemen of the Year as awarded by the 1000 Yard Rusher Club, Columbus, Ohio. In 1977 Joe received Forrest Gregg Award as NFL's Top Offensive Lineman.

In 1980 DeLamielleure was traded to the Cleveland Browns where he blocked for his 2nd NFL MVP, Brian Sipe. DeLamielleure becomes first player ever to block for a 2,000 yard rusher and a 4,000 yard passer. Of those who have done it since, (Jackie Slater, Doug Smith, Irv Pankey, Kevin Glover, and Tom Nalen) only DeLamielleure's duo were NFL MVPs and the passer (Sipe) also won the NFL passing crown. Also, the 1980 Browns offensive line led NFL in allowing the lowest sacks percentage and blocked for a 1,000-yard runner (Mike Pruitt). During his five years with Cleveland, he played every game. In 1979, he was named the NFL's All-Decade Team. He played his final year in the NFL, 1985, back with the Buffalo Bills.

In 1992, DeLamielleure had a short stint with the Charlotte Rage of the Arena Football League.[2]

DeLamielleure was named to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2003 and was inducted to the East-West Shrine Game Hall of Fame in 2007.[3]

DeLamielleure had an argument with Gene Upshaw, the head of the Players Union, about retired NFL player's pensions up until Upshaw's death in August 2008.

DeLamielleure was a promoter of the All-American Football League, a spring league that hoped to fill a void of the now defunct NFL Europe. The AAFL planned to take collegiate players provided they've earned a four-year college degree. However, the league did not play a game.

In 2009, DeLamielleure and his two former college teammates at Michigan State embarked on a bicycle ride from East Lansing, Michigan to the site of "The City of the Children" orphanage in Mexico. The bike tour was to raise funds needed to complete construction and provide the necessary resources to support the abandoned, abused and neglected children of that region.[4]

Coaching career

DeLamielleure later coached in the Charlotte area with the Private Coaching Service CoachUp.[5]

Notes

  • In 1969, DeLamielleure graduated from St. Clement High School in Center Line, MI. Joe is the only NFL football player ever from that school.
  • In 1975, DeLamielleure was the NFLPA AFC Arm Wrestling Champion (he lost the final to Ed White).
  • In 1978, DeLamielleure was the NFLPA NFL Racquetball Champion.
  • In 1979, DeLamielleure was NFLPA AFC Racquetball champion (he lost the final to the NFC competitor Rafael Septién who was 5'9" and 160 pounds).
  • In 1982, DeLamielleure competed in the NFL's Strongest Man Competition. The other contestants were Lyle Alzado, John Matuszak, Mike Webster, Steve Furness, Curt Marsh, and Bob Young. Only Marsh and DeLamielleure are still living and Marsh has had a leg amputated.
  • In 2004, DeLamielleure was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame.[6]

References

  1. ^ Member profile
  2. ^ ArenaFan Online Page
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 21, 2009. Retrieved July 21, 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Buffalo Bills.com
  5. ^ www.coachup.com/coaches/joed-11
  6. ^ DeLamielleure inducted into Michigan Sports Hall of Fame, mshof.org; accessed June 28, 2015.
1970 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1970 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State University in the 1970 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 17th season under head coach Duffy Daugherty, the Spartans compiled a 3–6 overall record (3–4 against Big Ten opponents) and finished in a tie for fifth place in the Big Ten Conference.No Spartans were selected as first-team players on the 1970 All-Big Ten Conference football teams, though three received second-team honors from either the Associated Press (AP) or the United Press International (UPI): split end Gordon Bowdell (AP-2, UPI-2); guard Joe DeLamielleure (AP-2); and halfback Eric Allen (UPI-2).

1971 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1971 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1971 Big Ten Conference football season.

1971 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1971 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State University in the 1971 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 18th season under head coach Duffy Daugherty, the Spartans compiled a 6–5 overall record (5–3 against Big Ten opponents) and finished in a tie for third place in the Big Ten Conference.Four Spartans were selected by either the Associated Press (AP) or the United Press International (UPI) as first-team players on the 1971 All-Big Ten Conference football team: running back Eric Allen (AP-1, UPI-1); offensive guard Joe DeLamielleure (AP-1, UPI-1); defensive tackle Ron Curl (AP-1, UPI-1); and defensive back Brad Van Pelt (AP-1, UPI-1).

1972 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1972 Big Ten Conference football season was the 77th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1972 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1972 Michigan Wolverines football team, under coach Bo Schembechler, compiled a 10–1 record, tied for the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring defense (5.2 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 6 in the final AP and Coaches Polls. Michigan won its first ten games with four conference shutouts, and was ranked No. 3 in the AP Poll prior to its 14–11 road loss to Ohio State. Defensive back Randy Logan and offensive tackle Paul Seymour were consensus first-team All-Americans. Schembecher won the first Big Ten Football Coach of the Year award.

The 1972 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, compiled a 9–2 record, tied with Michigan for the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (25.5 points per game), and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. The Buckeyes received the conference's berth in the 1973 Rose Bowl and lost to national champion USC, 42–17. Linebacker Randy Gradishar was a consensus first-team All-American.

Purdue running back Otis Armstrong led the Big Ten with 1,361 rushing yards, received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the conference's most valuable player, and was a consensus first-team All-American.

1972 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1972 Michigan State Spartans football team represented Michigan State University in the 1972 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 19th season under head coach Duffy Daugherty, the Spartans compiled a 5–5–1 overall record (5–2–1 against Big Ten opponents) and finished in fourth place in the Big Ten Conference.Five Spartans were selected by either the Associated Press (AP) or the United Press International (UPI) as first-team players on the 1972 All-Big Ten Conference football team: tight end Billy Joe Dupree (AP-2, UPI-1); offensive guard Joe DeLamielleure (AP-1, UPI-1); linebacker Gail Clark (AP-1, UPI-1); and defensive backs Bill Simpson (AP-1, UPI-1) and Brad Van Pelt (AP-1, UPI-1).On November 3, 1972, Duffy Daugherty announced that he would resign as Michigan State's head football coach at the end of the 1972 season. In 19 years as the head coach, he compiled a 109–69–5 record and won two Big Ten championships. Denny Stolz, who had been the Spartans' defensive coordinator for two years, was hired in December 1972 to replace Daugherty.

1973 Buffalo Bills season

The 1973 Buffalo Bills season was the 14th season for the team and their fourth season in the National Football League (NFL). The Bills finished in second place in the AFC East division and finished the 1973 NFL season with a record of 9 wins and 5 losses, the team's first winning record since 1966.Head coach Lou Saban began the second season of his second tenure with the Bills. Saban had previously led the team to the 1964 and 1965 AFL championships. It was the first season that the team played in Rich Stadium (now "New Era Field") after thirteen years playing at War Memorial Stadium.

The Bills were returning from 1–13 and 4–9–1 records in 1971 and 1972, respectively. Incumbent starting quarterback Dennis Shaw found himself in a battle with rookie Joe Ferguson for the starting job.

The season was defined by O.J. Simpson. The fifth-year running back became the first player in NFL history to rush for 2,000 yards in a season. Behind Simpson's record-setting season, the Bills set an NFL record for most team rushing yards in a 14-game season, with 3,088 and averaged 5.1 yards per carry, higher than every Super Bowl championship team in all of league history. Simpson was returning from his best professional season, in which he earned his first All-Pro recognition and first rushing title. In addition to establishing a then-record for single-season rushing yardage, with 2,003, Simpson established the single-season record for rushing yards gained per game (143.1 yards per game on 23.7 rushes per game, an average of six yards per carry), which still stands. The explosive offense centered on O.J. Simpson was nicknamed the "Electric Company" for its ability to turn on "The Juice" (i.e. "O.J." Simpson)

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1975 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1975. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1975.

1975 Buffalo Bills season

The 1975 Buffalo Bills season was the 16th season for the club, and their 6th in the National Football League.

1976 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1976. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1976.

1977 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1977. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1977.

1978 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1978. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that were included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

1978 Buffalo Bills season

The 1978 Buffalo Bills season was the 19th season for the club and its ninth in the National Football League. The Bills were coming off a season in which they only won three games, making 1978 a slight improvement.

Head coach Chuck Knox began his first season with the team, having coached the Los Angeles Rams for the previous five seasons. It was also Buffalo's first season after the departure of star running back O.J. Simpson, who had left for San Francisco in the offseason.

The Bills offense acquired a pair of weapons for quarterback Joe Ferguson: wide receiver Frank Lewis, who had spent the previous 7 seasons in Pittsburgh, and rookie running back Terry Miller, who ended the season with over 1,000 yards.The 1978 Bills' run defense allowed an NFL record 3,228 rushing yards; the 677 rushing attempts the Bills faced in 1978 is also an NFL record. Oddly, the Bills were first in the league in yards allowed on pass defense, giving up only 1,960 yards through the air.

1979 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1979. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that were included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1979.

1979 Buffalo Bills season

The 1979 Buffalo Bills season was the 20th season for the club, and its tenth in the National Football League.

Head coach Chuck Knox spent his second season with the Bills in 1979, improving on 1978's record by two games. The Bills were 7–6 with three games left to play, but they lost their final three games to finish with a losing record. (Even if Buffalo had won their final three games, they still would have lost the head-to-head tiebreaker to the Miami Dolphins (who finished 10–6) for the division title.)

Buffalo's loss to Miami in Week Seven was their 20th straight loss to the Dolphins, an NFL record.

The 1979 Bills were dead-last in rushing yards in the NFL, with only total 1,621 yards on the ground. Buffalo's 268 points scored was 23rd of the league's 28 teams.

1980 All-Pro Team

The 1980 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1980. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Pro Football Weekly chose a nose tackle due to the proliferation of 3-4 defenses in the NFL. They, and The Sporting News chose two inside linebackers.

Charlotte Rage

The Charlotte Rage were a professional arena football team based out of Charlotte, North Carolina. They were members of the Arena Football League from 1992 to 1996. They played their home games at the Charlotte Coliseum from 1992 to 1994 and then again in 1996 and the Independence Arena (now the Bojangles' Coliseum) in 1995. They were owned by Allen J. Schwalb, Joanne Faruggia and former National Football League and United States Football League quarterback Cliff Stoudt.

Electric Company (football)

The Electric Company were the offensive line of the Buffalo Bills during the mid-1970s that helped running back O. J. Simpson establish numerous National Football League (NFL) all-time records and earn numerous statistical titles. The nickname is sometimes more loosely used to refer to the Electric Company Offense for the Bills offensive unit or the Electric Company Buffalo Bills for the teams of this era.

During these years, Simpson established NFL records for single-season rushing yards (1973), single-season yards from scrimmage (1973), single-season rushing yards per game (1973), single-season touchdowns (1975), single-season 200-yard games (1973), consecutive 100-yard games (1972–73), single-game rushing yards (1973 & 1976) and career 200-rushing yard games. His single-season rushing yards per game and career 200-yard rushing games records still stand. Simpson was selected to the Pro Bowl team and as an All-Pro performer each year between 1972 and 1976. He won the rushing title in four of those five seasons. During this time period, Simpson became the only running back to twice have 200-yard rushing efforts in back-to-back games. Simpson was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his exploits.

Although the Buffalo Bills had winning records during the 1973, 1974, and 1975 seasons, only the 1974 team made the NFL playoffs during the eight-team format era. However, they were eliminated by the eventual Super Bowl IX champion Pittsburgh Steelers.

List of Buffalo Bills first-round draft picks

The Buffalo Bills are an American football franchise based in Orchard Park, New York. They are members of the American Football Conference (AFC) East division in the National Football League (NFL).Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. The NFL Draft, as a whole, gives the advantage to the teams that did poorly the previous season. The 30 teams that did not make the Super Bowl are ranked in order so the team with the worst record picks first and the team with the best record pick last. The two exceptions to this inverse order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion selects 32nd overall, and the Super Bowl loser selects 31st overall. If the franchise so chooses, they may trade their draft picks for any combination of draft picks, players, and money.

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