Jody Scheckter

Jody David Scheckter (born 29 January 1950) is a South African former motor racing driver. He competed in Formula One from 1972 to 1980, winning the Drivers' Championship in 1979 with Ferrari.

Jody Scheckter
Scheckter Monza 1979
Jody Scheckter in 1979 at Monza
Born29 January 1950 (age 69)
East London, South Africa
Formula One World Championship career
NationalitySouth Africa South African
Active years19721980
TeamsMcLaren, Tyrrell, Wolf, Ferrari
Entries113 (112 starts)
Championships1 (1979)
Wins10
Podiums33
Career points246 (255)[1]
Pole positions3
Fastest laps5
First entry1972 United States Grand Prix
First win1974 Swedish Grand Prix
Last win1979 Italian Grand Prix
Last entry1980 United States Grand Prix

Career

Scheckter was born in East London, Eastern Cape, and educated at Selborne College.

Formula One

He rapidly ascended to the ranks of Formula One after moving to Britain in 1970. His Formula 1 debut occurred at the US Grand Prix at Watkins Glen in 1972 with McLaren, where he ran as high as third place before spinning and finishing ninth. Immediately becoming a name to watch, he continued his development the following year, winning the 1973 SCCA L&M Championship and racing five times in F1. In France, he almost won in only his third start in F1 before crashing into Emerson Fittipaldi, the reigning World Champion, who said after the crash about Scheckter: "This madman is a menace to himself and everybody else and does not belong in Formula 1."[2] In his next start, the British Grand Prix at Silverstone, Scheckter's spin triggered a major accident which took nearly a dozen cars out of the race. The Grand Prix Drivers Association demanded his immediate banishment, which was only put off when McLaren agreed to rest their driver for four races.[2] Scheckter's McLaren M23 bore the number zero during the Canadian and American Grands Prix of 1973. Scheckter is one of only two F1 drivers to compete under this number, the other being Damon Hill. During the practice for the American event at the Watkins Glen circuit, Frenchman François Cevert, who was due to be Scheckter's Tyrrell teammate for 1974, was killed in an appalling accident at the fast uphill Esses corners. Scheckter was behind Cevert when he crashed, and he stopped his McLaren, got out of his car and attempted to help Cevert out of his destroyed Tyrrell, but the 29-year-old Frenchman had been cut in half by the circuit's poorly installed Armco barriers and was already dead. Witnessing Cevert's dreadful accident left an indelible mark on the South African and caused him to abandon his reckless ways, becoming a more mature and calculating driver as a result.[3]

ScheckterJody1976-07-31Tyrrell-FordP34
Scheckter in the iconic six-wheel Tyrrell P34 at the Nürburgring in 1976.

Tyrrell in 1974 gave him his first full-time drive in F1. Jody rewarded them with a third-place finish in the Drivers' Championship and a pair of wins in Sweden and Britain. During the year, he scored points in eight consecutive races, one of the longer scoring streaks of the time. A slight off-year followed, although he did become the only South African to win the South African Grand Prix, but his third year with the team in 1976 gave him another third-place finish in the Drivers' Championship. In that season, Tyrrell introduced the most radical car in F1 history, the innovative six-wheeled Tyrrell P34. Although he later went on record as saying the car was "a piece of junk", Scheckter gave the six-wheeler its only win on Sweden's Anderstorp circuit and in his twelve races with the car, he scored points ten times. This included a thrilling race-long battle for the lead in the American Grand Prix between himself and his great friend James Hunt.

Scheckter left for Walter Wolf's new team in 1977 and Scheckter gave the team a win in its maiden race. He won twice more with the team and was often on the podium, but finished second on points behind a more dominant Niki Lauda. A seventh-place finish with the team in 1978 followed and he left the team after the season to join Ferrari to partner Gilles Villeneuve in the team's ground effect 312T4 car.

Critics felt he would not get along well with the domineering management at Ferrari, but he far surpassed expectations and helped give F1's most recognisable team another Constructors' Championship, while Scheckter's consistent finishes, with three wins among them, gave him the Drivers' Championship in 1979.[2] However, he struggled badly in his 1980 title defence, even failing to qualify for one race. After managing only two points, Scheckter announced his retirement from the team and the sport. Scheckter was the last driver to win a Drivers' Championship for Ferrari until Michael Schumacher twenty-one years later in 2000.

After Formula One

Broadcaster

In 1981 CBS Sports hired Scheckter as a Pit reporter for its F1 coverage.

Scheckter was brought in by ABC's Wide World Of Sports as a Pit reporter for the 1983 Monaco Grand Prix.

Scheckter was a guest commentator for ITV during the 1999 San Marino Grand Prix, replacing Martin Brundle.

Other interests

In 1981, Scheckter won the World Superstars competition in Key Biscayne, Florida. He defeated athletes such as Russ Francis, Renaldo Nehemiah, Peter Mueller, Rick Barry, Gaétan Boucher and Andy Ripley. In 1983 he was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.

After Scheckter's retirement, he founded FATS Inc, a company which built firearms training simulators for military, law enforcement and security organisations. The sale of the company provided funds to allow Scheckter to help the racing careers of his sons Tomas and Toby. Tomas raced in the Indy Racing League where he won two races. Scheckter's brother, Ian, also raced in F1 for a few years.

In 2004 Scheckter was reunited with his championship-winning Ferrari at the South African two-seater F1x2 Charity Grand Prix at Kyalami in South Africa.

Present

Scheckter now spends his time as a biodynamic farmer,[4] having bought Laverstoke Park Farm, near Overton, Hampshire, 40 miles (64 km) west of London. As an organic farming expert, Scheckter was featured in 2005 on the Visionhealth DVD and TV documentaries "Asthma: An Integrated Approach", "Arthritis: An Integrated Approach" and "Diabetes: An Integrated Approach". On 20 November 2011, he also appeared on the Countryfile television show to make a case for organic food. Laverstoke Park Farm was also featured on BBC's "Escape To the Country" where Jody showed viewers how Buffalo Mozzarella was made. In December 2009, Scheckter announced his intention to produce a biodynamic sparkling wine by 2012.[5] In 2015 the farm was the setting for ITV's Sugar Free Farm where a group of celebrities had to go sugar free for two weeks whilst working on the farm. He is married and has six children: two, Toby and Tomas, from his previous wife Pamela; and four, Hugo, Freddie, Ila and Poppy, from his current marriage to Clare.

Racing record

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 WDC Points[1]
1972 Yardley Team McLaren McLaren M19A Cosworth V8 ARG RSA ESP MON BEL FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA
9
NC 0
1973 Yardley Team McLaren McLaren M19A Cosworth V8 ARG BRA RSA
9
ESP BEL MON SWE NC 0
McLaren M23 FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
NED GER AUT ITA CAN
Ret
USA
Ret
1974 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 006 Cosworth V8 ARG
Ret
BRA
13
RSA
8
3rd 45
Tyrrell 007 ESP
5
BEL
3
MON
2
SWE
1
NED
5
FRA
4
GBR
1
GER
2
AUT
Ret
ITA
3
CAN
Ret
USA
Ret
1975 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Cosworth V8 ARG
11
BRA
Ret
RSA
1
ESP
Ret
MON
7
BEL
2
SWE
7
NED
16
FRA
9
GBR
3
GER
Ret
AUT
8
ITA
8
USA
6
7th 20
1976 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Cosworth V8 BRA
5
RSA
4
USW
Ret
ESP
Ret
3rd 49
Tyrrell P34 BEL
4
MON
2
SWE
1
FRA
6
GBR
2
GER
2
AUT
Ret
NED
5
ITA
5
CAN
4
USA
2
JPN
Ret
1977 Walter Wolf Racing Wolf WR1 Cosworth V8 ARG
1
BRA
Ret
RSA
2
USW
3
MON
1
SWE
Ret
GBR
Ret
ITA
Ret
CAN
1
2nd 55
Wolf WR2 ESP
3
GER
2
NED
3
USA
3
Wolf WR3 BEL
Ret
FRA
Ret
AUT
Ret
JPN
10
1978 Walter Wolf Racing Wolf WR4 Cosworth V8 ARG
10
7th 24
Wolf WR1 BRA
Ret
RSA
Ret
MON
3
BEL
Ret
Wolf WR3 USW
Ret
Wolf WR5 ESP
4
SWE
Ret
FRA
6
GBR
Ret
GER
2
AUT
Ret
ITA
12
Wolf WR6 NED
12
USA
3
CAN
2
1979 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 312T3 Ferrari Flat-12 ARG
Ret
BRA
6
1st 51 (60)
Ferrari 312T4 RSA
2
USW
2
ESP
4
BEL
1
MON
1
FRA
7
GBR
5
GER
4
AUT
4
NED
2
ITA
1
CAN
4
USA
Ret
1980 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 312T5 Ferrari Flat-12 ARG
Ret
BRA
Ret
RSA
Ret
USW
5
BEL
8
MON
Ret
FRA
12
GBR
10
GER
13
AUT
13
NED
9
ITA
8
CAN
DNQ
USA
11
19th 2

Formula One non-championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6
1972 Yardley Team McLaren McLaren M19A Cosworth V8 ROC BRA INT OUL REP VIC
NC
1973 Yardley Team McLaren McLaren M19C Cosworth V8 ROC
Ret
INT
1974 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 006 Cosworth V8 PRE
2
ROC INT
1975 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Cosworth V8 ROC
Ret
INT SUI
1976 Elf Team Tyrrell Tyrrell 007 Cosworth V8 ROC
Ret
INT
3
1977 Wolf Racing Wolf WR1 Ford V8 ROC
2
1979 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 312T4 Ferrari Flat-12 ROC GNM DIN
3
1980 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 312T5 Ferrari Flat-12 ESP
WD

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Up until 1990, not all points scored by a driver contributed to their final World Championship tally (see list of points scoring systems for more information). Numbers without parentheses are Championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.
  2. ^ a b c "F1 Teams & Drivers Hall of Fame: Jody Schekter". Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. Retrieved 24 October 2007.
  3. ^ "The F1 teams for the 2019 season| Formula 1®". Formula1.com. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
  4. ^ "Formula One's Jody Scheckter Turns to Meat". foodmanufacture.co.uk. 1 March 2007. Archived from the original on 23 December 2007.
  5. ^ Lawrence, James, Decanter.com (14 December 2009). Jody Scheckter announces Hampshire winery plans
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Graham McRae
US Formula A/F5000
Champion

1973
Succeeded by
Brian Redman
Preceded by
Mario Andretti
Formula One World Champion
1979
Succeeded by
Alan Jones
1974 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1974 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Nivelles on 12 May 1974. It was race 5 of 15 in both the 1974 World Championship of Drivers and the 1974 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 85-lap race was won by Brazilian driver Emerson Fittipaldi, driving a McLaren-Ford, with Austrian Niki Lauda a close second in a Ferrari and South African Jody Scheckter third in a Tyrrell-Ford.

This was the second and last Belgian Grand Prix to be held at Nivelles. For most of the next decade, the race would be held at Zolder.

1974 British Grand Prix

The 1974 British Grand Prix (formally the John Player Grand Prix) was a Formula One motor race held at Brands Hatch on 20 July 1974. It was race 10 of 15 in both the 1974 World Championship of Drivers and the 1974 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 75-lap race was won by Jody Scheckter, driving a Tyrrell-Ford, with Emerson Fittipaldi second in a McLaren-Ford and Jacky Ickx third in a Lotus-Ford.

1974 Italian Grand Prix

The 1974 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monza on 8 September 1974. It was race 13 of 15 in both the 1974 World Championship of Drivers and the 1974 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 52-lap race was won by Lotus driver Ronnie Peterson after he started from seventh position. Emerson Fittipaldi finished second for the McLaren team and Tyrrell driver Jody Scheckter came in third.

1974 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1974 Monaco Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monaco on 26 May 1974. It was race 6 of 15 in both the 1974 World Championship of Drivers and the 1974 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. The 78-lap race was won by Lotus driver Ronnie Peterson after he started from third position. Jody Scheckter finished second for the Tyrrell team and Shadow driver Jean-Pierre Jarier came in third.

1974 Swedish Grand Prix

The 1974 Swedish Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Scandinavian Raceway on 9 June 1974. It was race 7 of 15 in both the 1974 World Championship of Drivers and the 1974 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers.

The race was dominated by the two Tyrrell-Cosworth 007s of Jody Scheckter and Patrick Depailler. Depailler took pole position, however Scheckter beat him by 0.380 sec in the race, to score his first Grand Prix win.

1975 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1975 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Zolder on 25 May 1975. It was race 6 of 14 in both the 1975 World Championship of Drivers and the 1975 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. It was the 33rd Belgian Grand Prix and the second to be held at the Circuit Zolder. The race was held over 70 laps of the four kilometre venue for a race distance of 280 kilometres.

The race was won by Austrian driver Niki Lauda driving a Ferrari 312T, his second victory for the year after winning Monaco two weeks prior. Lauda led 65 of the 70 laps, taking a 19-second victory over South African driver Jody Scheckter in a Tyrrell 007. Argentinian driver Carlos Reutemann drove his Brabham BT44B to third place. The win put Lauda into the lead of the championship for the first time in 1975, passing previous leader Emerson Fittipaldi.

1975 British Grand Prix

The 1975 British Grand Prix (formally the John Player Grand Prix) was a Formula One motor race held at Silverstone on 19 July 1975. It was race 10 of 14 in both the 1975 World Championship of Drivers and the 1975 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. It was the 30th British Grand Prix to be held since the race was first held in 1926 and the 17th time the race had been held at Silverstone. The race was held over 56 of the scheduled 67 laps of the four kilometre venue for a race distance of 264 kilometres.

The results were overshadowed by a heavy hail storm from Lap 53, which caused three out of the top four cars (Jody Scheckter, James Hunt, and Mark Donohue), to aquaplane and crash in the same corner, bringing an early finish to the race, and a significant absence on the podium. A number of other cars crashed at the same corner as well, including Wilson Fittipaldi, Jochen Mass, and John Watson. The race results were finalised the lap after the lap most cars crashed, giving Brazilian Emerson Fittipaldi, who had been the race leader prior to the storm, a one lap win in his McLaren M23. Carlos Pace, who was one of the crashers in his Brabham BT44B was classified in second position with another of the crashers, Tyrrell 007 driver Jody Scheckter classified third.

The win was the 14th and final win of Fittipaldi's career which had included two world championships. He would continue racing in Formula One until 1980. The win also vaulted Fittipaldi past Carlos Reutemann into second place in the championship, 14 points behind Lauda.

1975 South African Grand Prix

The 1975 South African Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Kyalami on 1 March 1975. It was race 3 of 14 in both the 1975 World Championship of Drivers and the 1975 International Cup for Formula One Manufacturers. It was the 21st South African Grand Prix since the first Grand Prix was held in 1934 and the ninth to be held at Kyalami just outside Johannesburg. It was held over 78 laps of the four kilometre circuit for a race distance of 320 kilometres.

Jody Scheckter became the first South African driver to win the race. Driving a Tyrrell 007, he took over the lead of the race from Carlos Pace on lap three and took a three-second win over the Brabham BT44B of Carlos Reutemann. Scheckter's Tyrrell team mate Patrick Depailler finished third.

1976 Swedish Grand Prix

The 1976 Swedish Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Scandinavian Raceway in Anderstorp, Sweden on 13 June 1976. It was the seventh round of the 1976 Formula One season and the ninth Swedish Grand Prix. The race was contested over 72 laps of the 4.0 km circuit for a race distance of 290 kilometres.

It saw the first and only win of a six-wheel car – the Tyrrell P34. The theory was that its four front wheels would increase mechanical front-end grip – with more rubber on the road – and thus eliminate understeer while at the same time improve cornering and braking. When it was revealed it was the instant sensation of the 1976 season.

Tyrrell's Jody Scheckter took pole, with Patrick Depailler in fourth. In the race it was Mario Andretti in the Lotus 77 who led for much of the race. Andretti however had been penalised sixty seconds for jumping the start. Andretti's engine failed on lap 46 while attempting to build his lead over the two Tyrrells. They went on to finish first and second, Jody Scheckter leading Patrick Depailler to the line for his second Swedish Grand Prix victory.

Eight laps before Andretti's retirement Chris Amon crashed his Ensign N176 after a suspension failure, allowing championship leader Niki Lauda to move into the position that became third in his Ferrari 312T2. Jacques Laffite continued to show the promise of the Ligier JS5 in fourth. James Hunt was fifth in his McLaren M23 and Clay Regazzoni climbed into the final point in the second Ferrari late in the race.

1977 German Grand Prix

The 1977 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Hockenheimring on 31 July 1977. It was the eleventh race of the 1977 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1977 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

The German Grand Prix was moved to Hockenheim following Niki Lauda's near-fatal accident at the dangerous Nürburgring in 1976. This was the second time the race was held at Hockenheim, the first being in 1970.

The 47-lap race was won by Lauda, driving a Ferrari. Jody Scheckter finished second in a Wolf-Ford, having started from pole position, while Hans-Joachim Stuck was third in a Brabham-Alfa Romeo.

1977 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1977 Monaco Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Monaco on 22 May 1977. It was the sixth race of the 1977 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1977 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

The 76-lap race was won by South African driver Jody Scheckter, driving a Wolf-Ford. It was Scheckter's second victory of the season, and the 100th World Championship race victory for the Ford-backed Cosworth DFV engine. Austrian Niki Lauda finished second in a Ferrari, with Argentinian teammate Carlos Reutemann third.

1977 Spanish Grand Prix

The 1977 Spanish Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 8 May 1977 at the Circuito del Jarama near Madrid, Spain. It was the fifth race of the 1977 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1977 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

The 75-lap race was won from pole position by American driver Mario Andretti, driving a Lotus-Ford. Argentinian Carlos Reutemann finished second in a Ferrari, with South African Jody Scheckter third in a Wolf-Ford.

1977 United States Grand Prix

The 1977 United States Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on October 2, 1977, at the Watkins Glen Grand Prix Race Course in Watkins Glen, New York. It was the fifteenth race of the 1977 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1977 International Cup for F1 Constructors. The event was also referred to as the United States Grand Prix East in order to distinguish it from the United States Grand Prix West held on April 3, 1977, in Long Beach, California.

The 59-lap race was won from pole position by James Hunt, driving a McLaren-Ford. In wet conditions, Hunt held off a late charge from Mario Andretti in the Lotus-Ford to take his second consecutive Watkins Glen victory. Jody Scheckter was third in the Wolf-Ford, while Niki Lauda clinched his second Drivers' Championship by finishing fourth in his Ferrari.

1978 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1978 Monaco Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 7 May 1978 at Monaco. It was the fifth race of the 1978 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1978 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

The 75-lap race was won by Frenchman Patrick Depailler, driving a Tyrrell-Ford. It was Depailler's first Formula One victory in his 69th Grand Prix. Niki Lauda finished second in a Brabham-Alfa Romeo, with Jody Scheckter third in a Wolf-Ford.

1979 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1979 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 13 May 1979 at Zolder. It was the sixth race of the 1979 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1979 International Cup for F1 Constructors.

The 70-lap race was won by Jody Scheckter, driving a Ferrari. Scheckter collided with Clay Regazzoni's Williams-Ford on the second lap, but recovered to take his first victory of the season. Jacques Laffite finished second in a Ligier-Ford, having started from pole position, while Didier Pironi achieved his first podium finish with third in a Tyrrell-Ford.

The race also saw the first appearance of Alfa Romeo as a works team since 1951. Driving the Alfa Romeo 177, Bruno Giacomelli qualified 14th, ahead of both Renaults and both McLarens, before retiring following a collision with Elio de Angelis in the Shadow-Ford.

1979 Formula One season

The 1979 Formula One season was the 33rd season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1979 World Championship of F1 Drivers and the 1979 International Cup for F1 Constructors which were contested concurrently over a fifteen-round series which commenced on 21 January 1979, and ended on 7 October. The season also included three non-championship Formula One races. Jody Scheckter of Scuderia Ferrari won the 1979 World Championship of F1 Drivers while Scuderia Ferrari won 1979 International Cup for F1 Constructors. Gilles Villeneuve made it a 1–2 for Ferrari in the championship, concluding a successful second half of the 1970s for Ferrari (three drivers' and four constructors' titles). Alan Jones finished the season strongly for Williams, finishing third in the championship and with teammate Clay Regazzoni scoring Williams's first ever Grand Prix win as a constructor. Scheckter's title was Ferrari's last drivers' title for 21 years, before Michael Schumacher won five consecutive titles for the team between 2000 and 2004.

As of May 2019, this is the only season the championship was won by a driver not from Europe, America, or Oceania.

1979 Monaco Grand Prix

The 1979 Monaco Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 27 May 1979 at Monaco. It was the 37th Monaco Grand Prix and the seventh round of the 1979 Formula One season.

The 76-lap race was won from pole position by Jody Scheckter, driving a Ferrari. Clay Regazzoni finished second in a Williams-Ford, with Carlos Reutemann third in a Lotus-Ford. Patrick Depailler set the fastest lap of the race in a Ligier-Ford.

In a race of attrition, John Watson was fourth in his McLaren-Ford, Depailler fifth despite an engine failure on the last lap, and Jochen Mass sixth in his Arrows A1. Mass had run as high as third in the race and seemed to be closing in on the leaders before brake issues dropped him down the field.

This was the last Formula One race for 1976 World Champion James Hunt. Hunt qualified tenth in his Wolf-Ford before retiring after four laps with a transmission problem.

1979 South African Grand Prix

The 1979 South African Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 3 March 1979 at Kyalami. The race, contested over 78 laps, was the third race of the 1979 Formula One season and was won by Gilles Villeneuve, driving a Ferrari. Teammate and local driver Jody Scheckter finished second, while Jean-Pierre Jarier finished third in a Tyrrell-Ford.

Formula One drivers from South Africa

There have been 23 Formula One drivers from South Africa, with 18 of them having started at least one Grand Prix, and only 4 of them having started more than four races. Jody Scheckter is by far the most prolific and successful South African driver, being the only one to have won a race. During his nine-year career Scheckter won ten races and the 1979 World Drivers' Championship. There has not been a driver from South Africa in Formula One since 1980.

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