Jock Slater

Admiral Sir John Cunningham Kirkwood "Jock" Slater, GCB, LVO, DL (born 27 March 1938) is a retired Royal Navy officer. He commanded a minesweeper, a frigate and then a destroyer before taking over the aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious and then achieving higher command in the Navy. He served as First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff from 1995 to 1998: in that capacity he played a key role in the 1998 Strategic Defence Review carried out by the Labour Government that had come to power a year earlier.

Sir Jock Slater
Naval Photo Jock Slater
Admiral Sir Jock Slater
Nickname(s)Jock
Born27 March 1938 (age 81)
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Navy
Years of service1958–1998
RankAdmiral
Commands heldFirst Sea Lord
Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff
Commander-in-Chief Fleet
Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland
HMS Dryad
HMS Illustrious
HMS Kent
HMS Jupiter
HMS Soberton
Battles/warsFalklands War
AwardsKnight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Lieutenant of the Royal Victorian Order
Legion of Merit (United States)

Early life

He was the son of James Kirkwood Slater FRSE OBE and Margaret Claire Byrom Bramwell (daughter of Dr Edwin Bramwell).[1]

Slater was educated at the Edinburgh Academy, Sedbergh School and the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth.[1] Slater is a great nephew of Admiral of the Fleet The Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope who served as First Sea Lord during the Second World War.[2]

Naval career

Slater joined the Royal Navy as a cadet in 1956 and was confirmed in the rank of sub lieutenant on 1 January 1959.[3] During his early career he served in the destroyer HMS Troubridge, the minesweeper HMS Yaxham, the Royal Yacht HMY Britannia and the destroyer HMS Cassandra.[1] In 1965 he was given command of the minesweeper HMS Soberton, which he commanded on fishery protection duties,[4] before specialising in navigation.[1] He was posted to the shore establishment HMS Dryad later that year and then served in the aircraft carrier HMS Victorious and then the frigate HMS Scarborough over the next two years.[1]

Slater became an Equerry to the Queen on 12 October 1968[5] and, having been promoted to lieutenant commander on 22 October 1968,[6] his services were recognised when he was made a Lieutenant of the Royal Victorian Order on 15 October 1971.[7] Following promotion to commander on 31 December 1971,[8] he was given command of the frigate HMS Jupiter in 1972.[1] He was posted to the Directorate of Naval Operations at the Ministry of Defence in 1973 and, following promotion to captain on 30 June 1976,[9] he was given command of the destroyer HMS Kent in August of that year.[1] He attended the Royal College of Defence Studies in 1978 and then became Assistant Director of Naval Warfare at the Ministry of Defence in 1979.[1] He went on to become the first commanding officer of the aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious in May 1981 and then became Captain at the School of Maritime Operations and Commander of HMS Dryad in July 1983.[1]

HMS Illustrious 1
The aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious which Slater commanded in the early 1980s

Slater was promoted to rear admiral on 18 June 1985,[10] on appointment as Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff (Policy and Nuclear), and then promoted to vice admiral on 20 October 1987,[11] on appointment as Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as NATO Commander Northern Sub-Area Eastern Atlantic, NATO Commander Nore Sub-Area Channel and Commander HM Naval Base Rosyth.[1] Appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in the 1988 Birthday Honours,[12] he went on to be Chief of Fleet Support in March 1989.[1] He was promoted to full admiral on appointment as Commander-in-Chief Fleet as well as NATO Commander-in-Chief, Channel and Commander-in-Chief, Eastern Atlantic in January 1991.[1] Advanced to Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath in the 1992 Birthday Honours,[13] he became Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff in January 1993.[1]

Slater was appointed First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff in July 1995.[1] In that capacity he played a key role in the Strategic Defence Review carried out by the incoming Labour Government.[14] He retired in October 1998.[1]

Later career

In retirement Slater has served as a Non-Executive Director of VT Group and of Lockheed Martin UK.[1] He has also been Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, Chairman of the Royal Navy Club of 1765 & 1785, Chairman of the Trustees of the Imperial War Museum and Chairman of the Council of Management of the White Ensign Association.[1] He has been a Deputy Lieutenant of Hampshire,[15] an Elder Brother of Trinity House a Prime Warden of the Shipwrights' Company, and a Freeman of the City of London.[1] His other interests mostly include outdoor activities.[1]

Family

In 1972 he married Ann Frances, daughter of William Scott OBE DL, by whom he has two sons (Charles and Rory).[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Who's Who 2010, A & C Black, 2010, ISBN 978-1-408-11414-8
  2. ^ "History and Development". Naval Records Society. Archived from the original on 7 September 2012. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  3. ^ "No. 42159". The London Gazette. 4 October 1960. p. 6703.
  4. ^ "Sir Jock Slater". Businessweek. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  5. ^ "No. 44790". The London Gazette. 14 February 1969. p. 1705.
  6. ^ "No. 44699". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 October 1968. p. 11321.
  7. ^ "No. 45499". The London Gazette. 19 October 1971. p. 11269.
  8. ^ "No. 45575". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 January 1972. p. 645.
  9. ^ "No. 46953". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 July 1976. p. 9281.
  10. ^ "No. 50148". The London Gazette. 10 June 1985. p. 8027.
  11. ^ "No. 51086". The London Gazette (Supplement). 12 October 1987. p. 12655.
  12. ^ "No. 51365". The London Gazette (Supplement). 10 June 1988. p. 2.
  13. ^ "No. 52952". The London Gazette (Supplement). 12 June 1992. p. 2.
  14. ^ "Former navy chief in government cuts warning". BBC News. 6 July 2010. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  15. ^ "The Vice Lord-Lieutenant and Deputy Lieutenants". Hampshire County Council. Retrieved 19 August 2012.

External links

Military offices
Preceded by
Sir George Vallings
Flag Officer, Scotland and Northern Ireland
1987–1989
Succeeded by
Sir Michael Livesay
Preceded by
Sir Benjamin Bathurst
Chief of Fleet Support
1989–1991
Succeeded by
Sir Neville Purvis
Commander-in-Chief Fleet
1991–1992
Succeeded by
Sir Hugo White
Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff
1993–1995
Succeeded by
Sir John Willis
First Sea Lord
1995–1998
Succeeded by
Sir Michael Boyce
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Joseph Gilbert
Chairman Board of Trustees,
Imperial War Museum

2001–2006
Succeeded by
Sir Peter Squire
Anthony Hoskins

Admiral Sir Anthony Hiley Hoskins, (1 September 1828 – 21 June 1901) was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer, he took part in the Cape Frontier War of 1851 and then saw action at the Battle of Canton in December 1857 and the Battle of Taku Forts in May 1858 during Second Opium War. Once promoted to flag officer rank, he acted as Second-in-Command of the Fleet at the bombardment of Alexandria in July 1882 during the Anglo-Egyptian War. He went on to be First Naval Lord in September 1891 but in that role took a relaxed view of the size of the Fleet and did not see the need for a large shipbuilding effort on the scale envisaged by some of his colleagues, such as Admiral Sir Frederick Richards and Admiral Sir John Fisher who were concerned about French and German naval expansion.

Benjamin Bathurst (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral of the Fleet Sir David Benjamin Bathurst (born 27 May 1936) is a former Royal Navy officer. After training as a pilot and qualifying as a helicopter instructor, Bathurst commanded a Naval Air Squadron and then two frigates before achieving higher command in the Navy. He served as First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff from 1993 to 1995: in that capacity he advised the British Government on the deployment of Naval Support including Sea Harriers during the Bosnian War.

British Forces Foundation

The British Forces Foundation is a British charitable foundation, launched in May 1999 by comedian Jim Davidson to support the well-being of the members of Britain's armed forces though the provision of high quality entertainment. The Prince of Wales is Patron, and former Prime Minister Baroness Thatcher was President. Jim Davidson remains Vice President. On the British Forces Foundation website, the current Vice Presidents (as of 29 December 2013) are: HE Mahfouz bin Mahfouz, Major General Arthur Denaro CBE, Admiral Sir Jock Slater GCB LVO DL and General The Lord Guthrie GCB LVO OBE. The current Trustees (as of 29 December 2013) are: Mr Laurie Mansfield (Chairman), WO1 Steve Cass, Air Vice Marshal David Crwys-Williams CB, Sir Gerald Howarth, Miss Katherine Jenkins OBE, Mr Jim Moir, Lieutenant General Peter Pearson CB CBE, Admiral Sir James Perowne KBE and The Rt Hon Lord Robertson of Port Ellen KT GCMG honFRSE PC.The BFF stages shows for the forces at home, and in combat zones, and also stages frequent fund-raising events including a polo tournament, and an annual fund-raising auction.

Among the stars to have recently worked with the BFF are Matt Lucas and David Walliams, Ray Winstone, Johnny Vaughan, Katherine Jenkins James Blunt, and Jimmy Carr.

In June 2009 Paralympic gold medalist DameTanni Grey-Thompson visited Headley Court Rehabilitation Centre with the BFF to speak with injured service personnel.

Equerry

An equerry (; from French écurie 'stable', and related to écuyer 'squire') is an officer of honour. Historically, it was a senior attendant with responsibilities for the horses of a person of rank. In contemporary use, it is a personal attendant, usually upon a sovereign, a member of a royal family, or a national representative. The role is equivalent to an aide-de-camp, but the term is now prevalent only in the Commonwealth of Nations.

George Darby

Vice Admiral George Darby (c.1720 – 1790) was a Royal Navy officer. He commanded HMS Norwich at the capture of Martinique in 1762 during the Seven Years' War. He went on to command the Channel Fleet during the American Revolutionary War and later in that war served as First Naval Lord when he commanded the force that relieved Gibraltar from its siege by the Spanish in April 1781.

George Vallings

Vice Admiral Sir George Montague Francis Vallings KCB (31 May 1932 – 25 December 2007) was a Royal Navy officer who became Flag Officer, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Henry Priestman (Royal Navy officer)

Captain Henry Priestman (ca. 1647 - 20 August 1712) was a Royal Navy officer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1695 to 1698.

Hugo White

Admiral Sir Hugo Moresby White, (22 October 1939 – 1 June 2014) was a senior officer of the Royal Navy and subsequently Governor of Gibraltar.

James Kirkwood Slater

Dr James Kirkwood Slater OBE FRSE FRCPE (1900–8 October 1965) was a 20th-century British neurologist.

John Chicheley

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Michael Boyce, Baron Boyce

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Michael Livesay

Admiral Sir Michael Howard Livesay KCB (5 April 1936 – 6 October 2003) was a senior Royal Navy officer who went on to be Second Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Personnel.

Neville Purvis

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RFA Fort George (A388)

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Fort George was ordered from Swan Hunter in late 1987. The ship was laid down in 1989, launched by the wife of the Commander-in-Chief Fleet Admiral Sir Jock Slater in 1991 and commissioned in 1993. Along with RFA Fort Victoria, the ship was equipped with two Phalanx CIWS point defence guns during a refit at Tyne in 1999.

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Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff (United Kingdom)

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Senior Naval Lords (1689–1771)
First Naval Lords (1771–1904)
First Sea Lords (1904–present)

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