Jim Tyrer

James Efflo Tyrer (February 25, 1939 – September 15, 1980) was an American football offensive tackle in the American Football League for the Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs. He also played in the National Football League for the Chiefs and the Washington Redskins.

Jim Tyrer
No. 77, 71
Position:Offensive tackle
Personal information
Born:February 25, 1939
Newark, Ohio
Died:September 15, 1980 (aged 41)
Kansas City, Missouri
Height:6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight:280 lb (127 kg)
Career information
High school:Newark (OH)
College:Ohio State
NFL Draft:1961 / Round: 14 / Pick: 188
AFL draft:1961 / Round: 3 / Pick: 22
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:194
Games started:55
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

Born and raised in Newark, Ohio, Tyrer played college football at nearby Ohio State University under head coach Woody Hayes, and earned All-America honors.

Professional career

Tyrer signed with the American Football League's Dallas Texans in 1961. He played 13 years with that franchise (180 consecutive games), which became the Kansas City Chiefs in 1963, helping set the standard for his position at left offensive tackle. His 14th and final season was with the Washington Redskins under head coach George Allen, who preferred veteran players. Tyrer was traded from the Chiefs in late August 1974 for three draft picks.[1]

Tyrer was named AFL Offensive Lineman of the Year in 1969. He and Ed Budde at guard made a powerful left side. In Super Bowl IV, Tyrer and Budde opened holes for Chiefs running backs against the Minnesota Vikings' opposing defensive linemen Jim Marshall and Alan Page, respectively, gaining 151 yards on 42 carries (3.6 yards per attempt) and 122 net passing yards in the team's upset 23–7 victory.

Tyrer was an anchor of Texans/Chiefs' line and was selected as The Sporting News'' AFL All-League tackle eight consecutive years, from 1962 through 1969. He was an AFL Western Division All-Star seven times, in 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968 and 1969 before also capturing a pair of All-AFC accolades in 1970–71. His efforts in the upstart league would result in his selection to the American Football League All-Time Team.

At the retirement press conference for former Chief linemate Dave Hill in Kansas City in June 1975, Tyrer also announced his retirement.[2]

Tyrer's playing credentials compare favorably with NFL linemen in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, however several factors evidently mitigate against his induction:

  • Many of his teammates have been inducted, and selectors tend to shy away from enshrining too many from the same team;
  • modern selectors may have little knowledge of the American Football League, or believe it was an inferior league; and
  • the unfortunate nature of his death.

Family

Tyrer's sons, Brad and Jason, went on to college football careers in the Big Eight Conference. Brad played for Nebraska under head coach Tom Osborne from 1983–1988, starting his junior and senior seasons. Tyrer and the Blackshirts defense led Nebraska to a win over LSU in the 1987 Sugar Bowl, a close loss to Florida State in the 1988 Fiesta Bowl, and a Big Eight title in 1988 and an appearance in the 1989 Orange Bowl. Jason was a defensive end for Kansas under head coach Glen Mason from 1988 to 1992.

After football

Remaining in the Kansas City area following his retirement, Tyrer turned down an opportunity to serve as a scout for the Chiefs. He then spent the next three years as a salesman before tiring of the constant travel and investing in a tire business. However, a mild winter proved to be financially disastrous for Tyrer, who moved on to work for Amway.

Death

This series of business misfortunes culminated in the early hours of September 15, 1980, when Tyrer, the father of four, shot and killed his wife and then committed suicide by turning the gun on himself.[3][4][5] On September 14, 1980, he attended a Chiefs game at Arrowhead Stadium with his ten-year-old son Jason.[6] He was survived by his four children: two sons and two daughters.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Redskins get Tyrer". Free Lance-Star. Fredericksburg, Virginia. August 29, 1974. p. 29.
  2. ^ "Hill, Tyrer end pro grid careers". Lawrence Journal-World. Kansas. Associated Press. June 14, 1975. p. 10.
  3. ^ "Former all-pro Tyrer kills wife, then self". Toledo Blade. Ohio. Associated Press. September 16, 1980. p. 23.
  4. ^ "Never Forget!". Sporting News. July 20, 2008. Archived from the original on August 30, 2008. Retrieved April 21, 2009.
  5. ^ "Tyrer death KC shocker". Lawrence Journal-World. Associated Press. September 16, 1980. p. 9.
  6. ^ Anderson, Dave (September 19, 1980). "Athletes' pride can be painful after sport". Lawrence Journal-World. Kansas. (New York Times news service). p. 15.

External links

1959 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1959 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1959 Big Ten Conference football season.

1960 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1960 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1960 Big Ten Conference football season.

1960 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1960 Ohio State Buckeyes football team represented the Ohio State University in the 1960 Big Ten Conference football season. The Buckeyes compiled a 7–2 record.

1962 All-AFL Team

The 1962 American Football League All-League Team was selected after the 1962 American Football League (AFL) season by three separate entities: current AFL players, the Associated Press (AP), and United Press International (UPI), and was published by The Sporting News. The AFL players only selected a first team, while the AP and UPI also selected second teams at some positions.

1965 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1965 Kansas City Chiefs season was the 6th season for the Kansas City Chiefs as a professional AFL franchise; they finished with a 7–5–2 record and missed the AFL playoffs.

For the 1965 season, the Chiefs were caught in the middle of the AFL and NFL's bidding wars for college talent. Kansas City made running back Gale Sayers from the University of Kansas their first-round draft pick, but Sayers eventually signed with the Chicago Bears, who had also drafted him with their first pick in the NFL's draft.The club suffered a devastating blow late in the 1965 season when running back Mack Lee Hill suffered torn ligaments in his right knee in the next-to-last regular season game of the year at Buffalo on December 12. Following what was expected to be a routine surgery on December 14 at Menorah Hospital in Kansas City, Hill died from what was termed "a sudden and massive embolism." Hunt called Hill's death "the worst shock possible." Just days after Hill's unexpected death, the mourning Chiefs defeated the Denver Broncos on December 19 to finish the year with a 7–5–2 record.

1966 American Football League Championship Game

The 1966 American Football League Championship Game was the seventh AFL championship game, played at War Memorial Stadium in Buffalo, New York, on January 1, 1967.It matched the Western Division champion Kansas City Chiefs (11–2–1) and the Eastern Division champion Buffalo Bills (9–4–1) to decide the American Football League (AFL) champion for the 1966 season.

The host Bills entered as two-time defending champions, but the visiting Chiefs were three-point favorites, mainly because of their explosive and innovative offense led by head coach Hank Stram. The Bills were a more conventional team with a solid defensive line and a running mindset on offense. The two teams had split their season series, played early in the schedule without weather as a factor, with the road team winning each.

The Chiefs defeated the Bills by a score of 31–7, and advanced to Super Bowl I to play against the National Football League (NFL) champion Green Bay Packers.

1967 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1967 Kansas City Chiefs season was the 8th season for the Kansas City Chiefs as a professional AFL franchise; Despite their AFL championship win and an appearance in the inaugural AFL-NFL championship game the previous year, the Chiefs missed the AFL playoffs for the first time since 1965.

The club’s special teams got a boost with the addition of kicker Jan Stenerud from Montana State and kick returner Noland “Super Gnat” Smith from Tennessee State. Interest in the team skyrocketed, forcing an increase in seating capacity at Municipal Stadium from 40,000 to 47,000. In June, Jackson County voters approved a $43 million bond issue for construction of a sports complex to be completed by 1972.

The Chiefs' first non-playoff game against an NFL team resulted in a commanding 66–24 Chiefs preseason victory against the Chicago Bears at Municipal Stadium on August 23. Injuries again hit the club hard during the regular season as the Chiefs clawed their way to a 9–5 record.

1968 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1968 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1969 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1969 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1969 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1969 Kansas City Chiefs season was the team's 10th, their 7th in Kansas City, and also their final season in the American Football League. It resulted in an 11–3 record and a 23–7 victory in Super Bowl IV over the NFL's heavily favored Minnesota Vikings. The team beat their rivals, the Oakland Raiders in the final AFL Championship Game, claiming their third AFL Championship in franchise history. The Chiefs were coached by Hank Stram, led by quarterback Len Dawson and a powerful defense led by Bobby Bell, Willie Lanier, Buck Buchanan, Emmitt Thomas, Johnny Robinson and Curley Culp. The Chiefs' defense became the fourth defense in the history of pro football to lead its league in fewest rushing yards, fewest passing yards and fewest total yards. The Chiefs were the second AFL team to win the Super Bowl and last AFL team to do so before the AFL-NFL Merger in the following season.

The season was marred not only by an injury to quarterback Len Dawson but also controversy surrounding Dawson and his purported involvement in a sports gambling ring. Back-up quarterback Mike Livingston and the Chiefs' stellar defense led the Chiefs back to the Super Bowl, this time, to win it all.

Along with owner Lamar Hunt, nine future Hall of Famers were members of the 1969 Chiefs, including QB Len Dawson, LBs Willie Lanier and Bobby Bell, DT Buck Buchanan, DT Curley Culp, CB Emmitt Thomas, S Johnny Robinson, K Jan Stenerud, and Coach Hank Stram.

In 2006, the 1969 Kansas City Chiefs were ranked as the 18th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions.In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1969 Chiefs as the seventh-greatest defense in NFL history, noting "Hank Stram's 'Triple Stack' defense, which gave the linebackers lots of room to roam, was superb, holding five opponents to fewer than 10 points and giving up an average of less than two touchdowns a game.... Then they got serious. Against the [defending] Super Bowl champion Jets in the AFL divisional playoff game at Shea Stadium, the Chiefs held on for a 13–6 victory, thanks to a remarkable three-play goal line stand that stifled the Jets on the one. After losing twice to the Raiders during the regular season, the Chiefs allowed a single touchdown, in the first quarter, to win the AFL title over Oakland 17–7. The Chiefs defense then stifled the Vikings in the Super Bowl, allowing only two rushing first downs and picking off three passes in the fourth quarter to win 23–7. Total points against the Chiefs in the playoffs: 20." Kansas City is the only team in the Super Bowl era to win the title without allowing as much as 10 points in any postseason game.

1970 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1970. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the consensus All-Pro team for 1970.

1970 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1970 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's debut season in the National Football League, the 7th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 11th overall. It began with the Chiefs attempting to defend their Super Bowl IV championship title but ended with a 7–5–2 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1967.

Following their championship success, the Chiefs traded running back Mike Garrett, who was the club's all-time leading rusher at the time, to San Diego after a week 3 loss in Denver, and replaced him in the lineup with Ed Podolak. Despite a 44–24 win against soon to be Super Bowl V Champion Baltimore on September 28 in just the second-ever telecast of ABC's Monday Night Football, the Chiefs owned a 3–3–1 record at the season's midpoint. One of the season's pivotal junctures came in a 17–17 tie against Oakland on November 1. The Chiefs were ahead 17–14 when Len Dawson apparently sealed the win, running for a first down which would have allowed Kansas City to run out the clock. While on the ground, Dawson was speared by Raiders defensive end Ben Davidson in an infamous incident that cost the Chiefs a victory and further inflamed the already heated Chiefs-Raiders rivalry. Wide receiver Otis Taylor retaliated and a bench-clearing brawl ensued. Offsetting penalties were called, nullifying Dawson's first down. The Chiefs were forced to punt and Raiders kicker George Blanda eventually booted a game-tying field goal with eight seconds remaining. Following the tie with Oakland the Chiefs' defense would permit only 43 points over the next 5 weeks, which included 4 wins and 6-6 tie with the St. Louis Cardinals at Municipal Stadium. The Cardinals had come into that game with a streak of three straight shutout wins. The Chiefs' D held St. Louis to a late FG as the game ended 6-6. After a 16-0 shutout of Denver the Chiefs had played to a 6-1-2 record over the past nine weeks to stand 7-3-2 with two weeks to play and very much looked like a team with a chance to defend its championship. Then came the big one at Oakland, the game that would decide who reigned supreme in pro football's toughest division. The game on December 12 was a Saturday stand-alone NBC national telecast. The Chiefs led early 3-0, and the game was tied 6-6 at the half. But the Raiders, behind the angry running of Marv Hubbard, dominated the 2nd half in a 20-6 AFC West title clinching win for Oakland. The Chiefs still had a slim hope for the AFC Wild Card spot. They however needed a win by a poor Buffalo team in Miami and then a Chiefs' win in San Diego to make the playoffs. Miami jumped to a 28-0 first quarter lead and rolled to a 45-7 win. The Chiefs warming up to play the Chargers saw the Miami blowout and knew their reign as Champions was over. Eliminated, the Chiefs played a uninspired sleep walk game, losing 31-13. In the end it was that tie in November with Oakland that ultimately cost the Chiefs the opportunity to win the AFC West division title as Kansas City finished the year with a 7–5–2 record, while the Raiders went 8–4–2. The rules were changed several years later to assess such penalties as the Davidson-Taylor incident as dead-ball fouls after the play counted.

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1971 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1971 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 2nd season in the National Football League, the 9th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 12th overall. They improved from a 7–5–2 campaign in 1970 to record a 10–3–1 mark and win the AFC West division championship, the Chiefs' first division title since 1966. The Chiefs tied with the Miami Dolphins for the best record in the AFC and were tied for the third-best record overall in the NFL, trailing only the 11–3 marks of the Dallas Cowboys and Minnesota Vikings.

Most of the pieces of the team which won Super Bowl IV two years earlier were still in place. Left defensive end Jerry Mays retired after the 1970 season, with Marvin Upshaw taking his spot, but the other 10 defensive starters were the same as they were two years prior. Middle linebacker Willie Lanier was a unanimous All-Pro selection following the season, and would likely have been named NFL Defensive Player of the Year had not Viking defensive tackle Alan Page become the second defensive player to win the league's Most Valuable Player award. Outside linebacker Bobby Bell, defensive tackles Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp, and cornerback Emmitt Thomas joined Lanier on the AFC Pro Bowl squad following the season. Bell, Buchanan, Culp, Lanier, and Thomas are all members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

On offense, Robert Holmes was traded to the San Diego Chargers midway through the season, leaving Wendell Hayes to assume the fullback duties next to third-year pro Ed Podolak, who had become the starting halfback when Mike Garrett was traded to San Diego in 1970. Morris Stroud, the tallest player in NFL history at 6-foot-10, and Willie Frazier, acquired from San Diego, alternated at tight end for the retired Fred Arbanas, but the rest of the offensive line, save for center Jack Rudnay, remained the same from the Super Bowl winning team. Rudnay assumed the starting center spot in 1970 over veteran E. J. Holub. At wide receiver, rookie Elmo Wright, the Chiefs' first-round pick in the 1971 NFL Draft from the University of Houston, assumed the slot opposite all-pro Otis Taylor, as Frank Pitts had moved on to the Cleveland Browns. Taylor earned selection to the Pro Bowl, along with guard Ed Budde, quarterback Len Dawson, and tackle Jim Tyrer.

Kansas City's special teams remained among the league's elite units, thanks to the combination of kicker Jan Stenerud and punter Jerrel Wilson, both of whom were named to the Pro Bowl. Podolak and Warren McVea handled the bulk of the return duties.

The season was the last for the Chiefs in Municipal Stadium, as owner Lamar Hunt and general manager Jack Steadman were overseeing the construction of Arrowhead Stadium, located at the junction of Interstate 70 and Interstate 435 in Jackson County, Missouri, at the eastern edge of the Kansas City city limits. Arrowhead, along with Royals Stadium, being constructed for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball, would form the Truman Sports Complex, bucking the trend of multi-purpose stadiums in vogue at the time.

The season ended in heartbreak, as the Miami Dolphins won the longest game in National Football League history on Christmas Day, defeating the Chiefs 27–24 in double-overtime on a 37-yard field goal by Garo Yepremian in the last football game in Municipal Stadium, as well as the last game for safety Johnny Robinson, who was an original member of the Dallas Texans in 1960. Coach Hank Stram often called the 1971 Chiefs the franchise's best-ever squad, and this loss haunted Stram for the rest of his life, even after his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Stram died July 4, 2005 at age 82. Others who are in the Hall of Fame from this squad are owner Hunt (who died December 13, 2006, at age 74), quarterback Dawson, and kicker Stenerud.

The loss to Miami began a nosedive in the Chiefs' fortunes. Kansas City backslid to 8–6 and 7–5–2 in 1972 and 1973, before falling to 5–9 and a tie for last in the AFC West in 1974, leading to the Stram's firing following the season. Kansas City would not reach the playoffs again until 1986, did not host (or win) another playoff game until 1991, and did not win the AFC West division title again until 1993.

1974 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1974 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 5th season in the National Football League, the 12th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 15th overall, it ended with a 5–9 record and the Chiefs missed the playoffs for the 3rd straight year and third-place finish in the AFC West, Hank Stram was fired after the season and was replaced by Paul Wiggin in 1975.

While the club's sparkling new facility at Arrowhead Stadium was drawing rave reviews, the Chiefs roster was beginning to show its age. The result was the team's first losing season in 11 years as the club was unable to string together consecutive victories during the year, a first in franchise history. Many of the club's key players were entering the twilight of their careers: Len Dawson was 39, Jim Tyrer was 35, Bobby Bell, Buck Buchanan, and Ed Budde were 34, Dave Hill was 33 and Otis Taylor was 32.One of the year's few bright spots in the 5–9 season was cornerback Emmitt Thomas, who led the league with a franchise-record 12 interceptions. The final game of the 1974 campaign marked the final time all seven of Kansas City's Pro Football Hall of Fame players from the club's AFL champion era took the field together with coach Hank Stram. Including owner Lamar Hunt and seven future Minnesota Vikings Hall of Famers, an amazing total of 16 Hall of Fame inductees were involved in that 1974 season finale game. That 35–15 loss against Minnesota provided an anticlimactic conclusion to Hank Stram's illustrious coaching career in Kansas City. Three days later, Stram, the only head coach in franchise history was relieved of his duties on December 27 after compiling a 124–76–10 regular season record with the club.

Ed Budde

Edward Leon Budde (born November 2, 1940) is a former American football player. He played professionally as an offensive guard for the Kansas City Chiefs in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL).

List of Kansas City Chiefs players

This is a select list of players from the Kansas City Chiefs football team from the National Football League.

For more information, see Kansas City Chiefs.

Tyrer

Tyrer is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alan Tyrer (1942–2008), English professional footballer

Anderson Tyrer (1893–1962), English concert pianist and orchestra conductor

Arthur Tyrer (born 1931), English former footballer

Christian Tyrer (born 1973), English former rugby league and rugby union footballer

Edward Tyrer (1917-2004), a senior British colonial police officer and Commissioner of Police, Hong Kong

Hayyim Tyrer (died 1813), rabbi

Jim Tyrer (1939-1980), American football player

Steve Tyrer (born 1989), English rugby league player

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