Jim Swink

Jim Swink (March 14, 1936 – December 3, 2014) was an All-American halfback at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas.

Swink grew up in Rusk, Texas, which led to his nickname, "The Rusk Rambler". He is remembered as one of the all-time greatest running backs in Southwest Conference history, and led the Horned Frogs to consecutive conference championships in 1955 and 1956, which resulted in trips to the Cotton Bowl Classic.

While he was named an All-American as a junior and senior, his best season came as a junior in 1955. That year, he rushed for 1,283 yards, which was second-best in the nation, and led the country with 125 points scored. His best game came against rival Texas in Austin, when he rushed 15 times for 235 yards and scored 26 points in a 47-20 rout of the Longhorns. That year, he finished second to Howard Cassady of Ohio State in the voting for the Heisman Trophy.

After finishing his degree at TCU, he decided to forgo playing in the National Football League and instead went to medical school. In 1960, he joined the American Football League's Dallas Texans for their inaugural season.

According to the book June 17, 1967 Battle of Xom Bi by David Hearne (page 192....)

The presence of thirty-one-year-old Captain James E. Swink, our battalion surgeon, was an additional blessing for our wounded men as they were pulled out of the wood line. During battalion size operations, operations, Swink would often travel with us to the field. He had been assigned to the Black Lions after a five-month stint at the 12th Evacuation Hospital in Cu Chi, Vietnam. He was there in the aftermath of the battle helping the medics with the wounded. Jim Swink was from Rusk, Texas. He had been a famed player in his earlier years earning him the moniker "the Rusk Rambler" as he led TCU to consecutive conference championships and Cotton Bowl appearances. In fact, Captain Swink was a two time “All American” halfback who finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1955. After graduating from TCU, he rejected an NFL career even though drafted by the Chicago Bears. In numerous interviews, Swink stated he had been Inspired by a physician in Rusk, Texas to pursue a medical career.[ 11] It must have been a difficult decision because Swink had proven himself a formidable football player. He had led the nation in scoring and placed second in rushing in 1955. He got to play against Jim Brown and Swink’s team won. He is also remembered for being the object of the University of Texas expression, “Hook em Horns.”[ 12] Prior to the November 12, 1955, game Texas students had come up with the oft-heard phrase in the hopes of unsettling Swink and his team, the Horned Frogs, but it didn’t work. Even with thousands of Texas students screaming “Hook em horns,” Swink still played one of his best games, rushing for 235 yards on 15 carries for a 15.7-yard average and scored a school-record of 26 points. The Frogs trounced the Longhorns, 47-20 that afternoon. Captain Swink also fought hard for us, and though he had little in the field to work with, just his presence was comforting to us and especially to the medics. With James Swink around there was someone to go to when a wfor them. Ross Phillips said Swink was accessible and didn’t play the rank game. He said Swink was a fun guy who was always a dedicated doctor. During his tour he was wounded and received a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star metal for his outstanding contribution to the cause.ounded soldier was beyond what a medic felt capable of handling. Captain Swink did whatever he could with the little he had in the field. He said "We can give them some pain medication and start an IV on them or very rarely maybe a system with their airway and breathing.” His biggest goal as he stated, “You get them on a helicopter as fast as you can." In another photograph taken by AP photographer Henri Huet, it shows Captain Swink with his stethoscope dangling from his neck working hard on a wounded soldier. Opposite of him is a soldier with a cigarette hanging from his lips who appears to be assisting. In the background you can see other soldiers, one with his shirt off and two more, probably Jim Callahan and Mike Stout, working on another wounded soldier. The photograph appears to have been taken at a makeshift triage area. The medics liked Captain Swink and he had great respect for them. Ross Phillips said Swink was accessible and didn’t play the rank game. He said Swink was a fun guy who was always a dedicated doctor. During his tour he was wounded and received a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star metal for his outstanding contribution to the cause.

He later practiced medicine in Fort Worth as an orthopedic surgeon. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1980, and in 1982 was presented with a Silver Anniversary Award by the NCAA for career achievements outside of football. In 2005, he was awarded the Doak Walker Legends award.

Swink died December 3, 2014 at his home in Rusk, Texas due to complications of lymphoma.[1] According to his wife he continued his medical practice until he became ill.

Jim Swink
No. 23
Swink fleer 1960
Swink with the Dallas Texans on
a Fleer trading card, 1960
Born:March 14, 1936
Sacul, Texas
Died:December 3, 2014 (aged 78)
Rusk, Texas
Career information
Position(s)Halfback
CollegeTexas Christian
NFL draft1957 / Round: 2 / Pick: 25
(by the Chicago Bears)
Career history
As player
1960Dallas Texans

See also

References

  1. ^ "Jim Swink, star TCU running back of the '50s, dies".

External links

1955 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1955 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1955 college football season. The selectors for the 1955 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press (UP). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UP are designated in bold.

1955 College Football All-America Team

The 1955 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1955. The eight selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1955 season are (1) the All-America Board (AAB), (2) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (3) the Associated Press, (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (7) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

1956 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1956 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1956 college football season. The selectors for the 1956 season included the United Press (UP).

1956 College Football All-America Team

The 1956 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1956. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1956 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the International News Service (INS), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (6) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

1956 Cotton Bowl Classic

The 1956 Cotton Bowl Classic featured the TCU Horned Frogs and the Ole Miss Rebels. It was the 20th Cotton Bowl Classic held.

1957 Cotton Bowl Classic

The 1957 Cotton Bowl Classic featured the TCU Horned Frogs and the Syracuse Orangemen, played on New Year's Day.

Abe Martin

Othol Hershel "Abe" Martin (October 18, 1908 – January 11, 1979) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head coach at Texas Christian University (TCU) from 1953 to 1966, compiling a record of 74–64–7. Martin was also the athletic director at Texas Christian from 1963 to 1975.

Donold Lourie

Donold B. Lourie (August 22, 1899 – January 15, 1990) was an American businessman, government official, and college football player. He served for many years as the president of the Quaker Oats Company, and held various other executive positions there and for several other businesses. President Dwight D. Eisenhower appointed Lourie to a position in the State Department, and he served in that capacity for one year. Lourie attended Princeton University where he was a star quarterback, and he was named a consensus All-American as a junior. Lourie was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1974.

List of TCU Horned Frogs in the NFL Draft

This is a list of TCU Horned Frogs football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Texas Christian University alumni

TCU has roughly 75,000 living alumni. The following lists alphabetically the most prominent graduates of Texas Christian University.

National Football Foundation Distinguished American Award

The National Football Foundation Distinguished American Award is among the highest offered by the National Football Foundation (NFF). Every year, the NFF & College Football Hall of Fame pays tribute to a select few with awards of excellence for exhibiting superior qualities of scholarship, citizenship and leadership. Additionally, the Foundation also recognizes individuals who demonstrate outstanding support for the NFF and its mission of promoting the game of amateur football. The Distinguished American Award is presented on special occasions when a truly deserving individual emerges, the award honors someone who has applied the character building attributes learned from amateur sport in their business and personal life, exhibiting superior leadership qualities in education, amateur athletics, business and in the community.

The recipient is not limited to a former college player or coach, must be an outstanding person who has maintained a lifetime of interest in the game and who, over a long period of time, has exhibited enviable leadership qualities and made a significant contribution to the betterment of amateur football in the United States.

National Football Foundation Gold Medal winners

Each football season, the National Football Foundation and the College Football Hall of Fame pay tribute to a select few with awards of excellence for exhibiting superior qualities of scholarship, citizenship and leadership. The Foundation also recognizes individuals who demonstrate outstanding support for the NFF and its mission of promoting the game of amateur football. The NFF Gold Medal is the highest award offered by the NFF.

Red McCombs

Billy Joe "Red" McCombs (born October 19, 1927), is an American businessman. He is the founder of the Red McCombs Automotive Group in San Antonio, Texas, a co-founder of Clear Channel Communications, chairman of Constellis Group, a former owner of the San Antonio Spurs, San Antonio Force, Denver Nuggets, the Minnesota Vikings, and the namesake of the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin. He is on the Forbes 400 list of richest Americans. He is also known for his philanthropy.

In 2012, the San Antonio Express-News reported McCombs' net worth at $1.4 billion. He was ranked the 913th richest man in the world. Two other San Antonio men at the time, Charles Butt of the H-E-B supermarket chain and Rodney Lewis, a natural gas driller, finished above McCombs on the list. In 2017, Forbes placed the value of McCombs' fortune at $1.6 billion with a ranking of No. 1,290 on a list of the world's billionaires.

Roscoe Brown

Roscoe Conkling Brown Jr. (March 9, 1922 – July 2, 2016) was one of the Tuskegee Airmen and a squadron commander of the 100th Fighter Squadron of the 332nd Fighter Group He was appointed to this position in June 1945, which was after V-E Day (May 8, 1945). During combat, he served as a flight leader and operations officer only. He graduated from the Tuskegee Flight School on March 12, 1944 as member of class 44-C-SE and served in the U.S. Army Air Forces in Europe during World War II. During this period, Captain Brown shot down an advanced German Me 262 jet fighter and a FW-190 fighter. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Brown was born in Washington, D.C. in 1922. His father, Roscoe C. Brown Sr. (1884–1963), was a dentist and an official in the United States Public Health Service who was born as George Brown and had changed his name to honor Roscoe Conkling, a strong supporter of the rights of African Americans during Reconstruction. His mother was the former Vivian Berry, a teacher.Prior to his wartime service, he graduated from Springfield College, Springfield, Massachusetts, where he was valedictorian of the Class of 1943.After the war, Captain Brown resumed his education. His doctoral dissertation was on exercise physiology and he became a professor at New York University and directed their Institute of Afro-American Affairs. He was President of Bronx Community College from 1977 to 1993 and then director for the Center for Education Policy at the City University of New York. In 1992, Brown received an honorary doctor of humanics degree from his alma mater, Springfield College.

On March 29, 2007, Brown attended a ceremony in the U.S. Capitol rotunda, where he and the other Tuskegee Airmen collectively, not individually, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in recognition of their service.He was also a member and past president of the 100 Black Men of America New York Chapter. and professor of Urban Education at the CUNY Graduate Center. Brown died on July 2, 2016 at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, N.Y. at the age of 94. He had resided in Riverdale in his latter years.

Rusk, Texas

The population was 5,551 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Cherokee County.

TCU Horned Frogs football

The TCU Horned Frogs football team is the intercollegiate football team of Texas Christian University (TCU). The Horned Frogs compete in Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States.

Since 2012, the Horned Frogs have been a member of the Big 12 Conference, and were previously members of the Mountain West Conference (MWC), Western Athletic Conference (WAC), Conference USA (C-USA), Southwest Conference (SWC), and Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association (TIAA).

TCU began playing football in 1896 and claims national championships in 1935 and 1938. TCU has one Heisman Trophy winner, Davey O'Brien, and has had eight former players inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. The Horned Frogs play their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on the TCU campus in Fort Worth.

TCU ranks as the 28th best college football program of all time and the 4th best private college football school of all time, behind Notre Dame, USC, and Miami-FL. The Horned Frogs are also one of only four FBS teams to have played in all six College Football Playoff Bowls, winning all but the Fiesta and Orange.

In 2017, TCU and Coach Patterson reached their 10th 11 win season since Gary Patterson has been coaching for the program. That is the 4th most 11 win seasons since 2001 in all of college football.

TCU Horned Frogs football statistical leaders

The TCU Horned Frogs football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the TCU Horned Frogs football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Horned Frogs represent Texas Christian University in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although TCU began competing in intercollegiate football in 1896, the school's official record book does not generally include records from the 1930s and before, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent. These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1930s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Horned Frogs have played in 13 bowl games since then, allowing players in these seasons an additional game to accumulate statistics.

All of TCU's 10 highest seasons ranked by total offensive yards have come during the 21st century. The Horned Frogs obliterated its school record in 2014, accumulating 6,929 yards of total offense after switching to an air raid offense. The Horned Frogs broke this record in 2015 by putting up 7,317 yards.These lists are updated through the end of the 2017 season.

Texas Christian University

Texas Christian University (TCU) is a private Christian-based, coeducational university in Fort Worth, Texas, established in 1873 by brothers Addison and Randolph Clark as the Add-Ran Male & Female College.

The campus is located on 272 acres (1.10 km2) about three miles (5 km) from downtown Fort Worth. TCU is affiliated with, but not governed by, the Disciples of Christ. The university consists of eight constituent colleges and schools and has a classical liberal arts curriculum. It is ranked in the Top 100 National Universities by the US News and World Report and is categorized as a Doctoral University: Higher Research Activity (R2) in the Carnegie Classifications by the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research. Its mascot is the horned frog, the state reptile of Texas. TCU is the only college or university in the world that has the horned frog as its mascot. For most varsity sports TCU competes in the Big 12 conference of the NCAA's Division I. The university enrolls around 10,394 students, with 8,892 being undergraduates. As of February 2016, TCU's total endowment was $1.514 billion.

Walter J. Zable

Walter Joseph Zable (June 17, 1915 – June 23, 2012) was an American businessman, entrepreneur, semi-professional football player and standout college athlete. He was the founder, chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) of Cubic Corporation, a public corporation providing military defense equipment and automated fare collection equipment. At the time of Zable's death, he was the world's oldest public company CEO and Cubic was worth 1.28 billion dollars. Earlier in his life he had played semi-professional football for the Richmond Arrows in the Dixie League. Some sources also mention him as having played for the National Football League's New York Giants, although no official Giants records exist of his having played for the team.

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