Jim Shofner

James Bernard Shofner (born December 18, 1935) is a former American football player and coach at both the collegiate and professional levels. He was twice a head coach: first at Texas Christian University (TCU) from 1974 to 1976, then in an interim capacity with the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL) in 1990.

Jim Shofner
Biographical details
BornDecember 18, 1935 (age 83)
Grapevine, Texas
Alma materTexas Christian University
Playing career
1955–1957TCU
1958–1963Cleveland Browns
Position(s)Defensive back, halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1966TCU (assistant)
1967–1969San Francisco 49ers (DB)
1970–1973San Francisco 49ers (QB/WR)
1974–1976TCU
1977San Francisco 49ers (DB)
1978–1980Cleveland Browns (QB)
1981–1982Houston Oilers (OC)
1983–1985Dallas Cowboys (QB)
1986–1989St. Louis/Phoenix Cardinals (OC)
1990Cleveland Browns (OC)
1990Cleveland Browns (interim)
1992–1996Buffalo Bills (QB)
Head coaching record
Overall2–31 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-Southwest (1957)

Early life and playing career

Shofner was a four-sport star at North Side High School in Fort Worth, Texas, serving as captain of three squads. He played college football on both sides of the ball at Texas Christian, leading the Southwest Conference in rushing in 1957 with 682 yards, while scoring six touchdowns. He was a first round draft selection of the Cleveland Browns the following year, and after seeing little action as a rookie, became a starting cornerback in 1959.

During this period, the magic that Paul Brown had enjoyed during his first decade as head coach of the Browns had faded, with the team failing to reach the playoffs during Shofner's six years with the team. On March 17, 1964, Shofner announced his retirement, citing a business opportunity involving the insurance business in which he was involved. That opportunity apparently disappeared when Shofner signed as an assistant coach at Texas Christian, his alma mater, beginning a three-decade run in the coaching ranks.

Coaching career

Shofner served for one season in his role at TCU, before returning to the NFL as an assistant with the San Francisco 49ers on March 6, 1967. Despite a head coaching change after the first season, Shofner would stay with the team for another six years, starting on defense before shifting to the offensive side. In 1970, he helped quarterback John Brodie win Most Valuable Player honors with a career year.

On December 5, 1973, Shofner was named head coach at Texas Christian, but the team endured a 20-game losing streak and Shofner won just twice in three seasons before resigning. In 1977, Shofner resurfaced with the 49ers before serving as the architect of the Cleveland Browns' offense for three seasons. During his final year with the team, Shofner watched Browns' quarterback Brian Sipe throw for more than 4,000 yards and win the NFL Most Valuable Player award.

That success resulted in his hiring as offensive coordinator of the Houston Oilers on February 4, 1981, but the team had slipped from its recent success. After two seasons, Shofner again announced he was leaving to enter private business, but instead, was hired in the same role with the Dallas Cowboys, where he spent three years.

Following the conclusion of the 1985 NFL season, Shofner was demoted by the Cowboys and left to work for the St. Louis Cardinals. Midway through his four years with the team, the franchise was relocated to Arizona, but the switch proved to have no effect on the team's dismal fortunes.

Shofner returned to Cleveland for the 1990 NFL season, but the success he had enjoyed a decade earlier was non-existent as the Browns' collapsed, resulting in head coach Bud Carson's firing on November 5. Shofner was named interim head coach, but the team won only one of the remaining seven games.

After spending the 1991 NFL season in a scouting capacity with the Browns, Shofner returned to the field in 1992 when he was hired as quarterback coach with the Buffalo Bills. During his first two seasons, the Bills reached the Super Bowl, but after a disappointing 1996 season, Shofner was reassigned to the team's scouting staff.

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
TCU Horned Frogs (Southwest Conference) (1974–1976)
1974 TCU 1–10 0–7 8th
1975 TCU 1–10 1–6 7th
1976 TCU 0–11 0–8 9th
TCU: 2–31 1–21
Total: 2–31

NFL

Team Year Regular Season Postseason
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
CLE 1990 1 6 0 .143 4th in AFC Central
Total 1 6 0 .143
1957 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1957 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1957 college football season. The selectors for the 1957 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press (UP). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UP are designated in bold.

1957 Cotton Bowl Classic

The 1957 Cotton Bowl Classic featured the TCU Horned Frogs and the Syracuse Orangemen, played on New Year's Day.

1960 Cleveland Browns season

The 1960 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 11th season with the National Football League. The 1960 Browns compiled an 8–3–1 record, and finished second in the NFL's Eastern Conference, behind the NFL champion Philadelphia Eagles. As runner-up, the Browns qualified for the inaugural third place Playoff Bowl in Miami, but lost 17–16 to the Detroit Lions on January 7.

1963 Cleveland Browns season

The 1963 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 14th season with the National Football League.

Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown led the league in rushing for the 6th time in seven seasons. As a team, the 1963 Browns gained an NFL-record 5.74 yards per carry.

1974 TCU Horned Frogs football team

The 1974 TCU Horned Frogs football team represented Texas Christian University (TCU) in the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. The Horned Frogs finished the season 1–10 overall and 0–7 in the Southwest Conference. The team was coached by Jim Shofner, in his first year as head coach. The Frogs played their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on campus in Fort Worth, Texas.

1975 TCU Horned Frogs football team

The 1975 TCU Horned Frogs football team represented Texas Christian University (TCU) in the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. The Horned Frogs finished the season 1–10 overall and 1–6 in the Southwest Conference. The team was coached by Jim Shofner, in his second year as head coach. The Frogs played their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on campus in Fort Worth, Texas.

1976 TCU Horned Frogs football team

The 1976 TCU Horned Frogs football team represented Texas Christian University (TCU) in the 1976 NCAA Division I football season. The Horned Frogs finished the season 0–11 overall and 0–8 in the Southwest Conference. The team was coached by Jim Shofner, in his third and final year as head coach. The Frogs played their home games in Amon G. Carter Stadium, which is located on campus in Fort Worth, Texas.

1986 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1986 St. Louis Cardinals season was the sixty-seventh season for the franchise was in the league, and the 27th and penultimate season in St. Louis. The team failed to improve on their previous output of 5–11, winning only four games. This was the fourth straight season in which the team did not reach the playoffs.

1988 Phoenix Cardinals season

The 1988 Phoenix Cardinals season was the franchise's 69th season in the National Football League and the first season in Phoenix. The Cardinals would match their 7–8 record from 1987, but finished with one more loss, going 7–9, as 1987 was a one-game strike shortened season, and 1988 was a full 16 game season. The Cardinals move to Phoenix marked the first time an NFL team called a place in Arizona home.

1989 Phoenix Cardinals season

The 1989 Phoenix Cardinals season was the franchise’s 70th year with the National Football League (NFL) and the second season in Phoenix. With five games to go in the season, fourth-year coach Gene Stallings announced he would retire at the end of the season. Instead, general manager Larry Wilson ordered Stallings to leave immediately and named running backs coach Hank Kuhlmann as interim coach for the rest of the season. The Cardinals were 5–5 through ten games but would finish the season on a six-game losing streak, which would knock them out of the playoffs.

1990 Cleveland Browns season

The 1990 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 41st season with the National Football League.

The season was the second for head coach Bud Carson, but the Browns started the season 2–7. Carson was fired one day after a Week Nine shutout loss to the eventual AFC Champion Buffalo Bills. He was replaced by former Browns quarterback Jim Shofner, who finished the season with only one additional win. The move didn't help as the Browns finished 3-13.

The 1990 Browns surrendered 462 points, the most points of any NFL team in the 1990s. Their −234 point differential is the third-worst total of any team in the '90s, even worse than the 1999 Browns expansion team.

1991 NFL season

The 1991 NFL season was the 72nd regular season of the National Football League. It was the final season for legendary coach Chuck Noll. The season ended with Super Bowl XXVI when the Washington Redskins defeated the Buffalo Bills 37–24 at the Metrodome in Minnesota. This was the second of four consecutive Super Bowl losses for Buffalo.

Bud Carson

Leon H. "Bud" Carson (April 28, 1930 – December 7, 2005) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at the Georgia Institute of Technology from 1967 to 1971, compiling a record of 27–27. Carson then coached in the National Football League (NFL), mostly as a defensive coordinator. He was a member of two Super Bowl-winning teams with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1970s. Carson served as the head coach of the Cleveland Browns from 1989 until he was fired midway through the 1990 season.

Fred Cahoon

Frederick Miller Cahoon (November 26, 1876 – September 13, 1945) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as head coach in all three sports between 1913 and 1920 at Texas Christian University (TCU), where was also school's director of bands.

Freddie Kitchens

Freddie Kitchens (born November 29, 1974) is an American football coach and former player who is the head coach for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL). He has previously been a coach for the Arizona Cardinals, Dallas Cowboys, Mississippi State Bulldogs, North Texas Mean Green, and LSU Tigers. With the Cardinals, Kitchens has won one NFC Championship (in 2008) and was the NFC runner-up in 2015.

List of Cleveland Browns head coaches

The Cleveland Browns are a professional American football franchise based in Cleveland, Ohio. They are a member of the North Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The team began playing in 1946 as a charter member of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC), and joined the NFL as part of the AAFC–NFL merger in 1950. The team played their home games at Cleveland Stadium from 1946 to 1995 before moving to FirstEnergy Stadium, where they have played since 1999. The Browns did not play from 1996 to 1998 when the team's owner, Art Modell, moved the team to Baltimore, Maryland and formed the Baltimore Ravens. The team was re-activated under new ownership in Cleveland in 1999. The team is currently owned by Jimmy Haslam III, and Joe Banner is their Chief Executive Officer. Tom Heckert was their general manager until the end of the 2012 season, when he was fired along with the team's incumbent head coach Pat Shurmur.There have been 17 non-interim head coaches for the Browns franchise. Their first head coach was Paul Brown, who coached for 17 complete seasons. Brown is also the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular season games coached (214), the most regular season game wins (158), the most playoffs games coached (14), and the most playoff game wins (9). Brown is the only Browns head coach to win an AAFC championship with four, the NFL championship with three, the Sporting News NFL Coach of the Year three times, the United Press International (UPI) NFL Coach of the Year once, and to have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as a coach. Blanton Collier, Dick Modzelewski, Sam Rutigliano, Bud Carson, Jim Shofner, Chris Palmer, Butch Davis, and Rob Chudzinski have spent their entire NFL head coaching careers with the Browns. Eric Mangini had been the head coach of the Browns since the firing of Romeo Crennel, but was himself fired on January 3, 2011. Shurmur replaced Mangini as head coach, but was fired after posting a 9–23 record over two seasons in charge. On January 11, 2013, the Cleveland Browns officially named Rob Chudzinski as the replacement for Pat Shurmur. Chudzinski compiled a 4–12 record during the 2013 season, but he was fired on December 29. On January 23, 2014, the Browns hired Mike Pettine as their head coach. Pettine was fired on January 3, 2016, hours after the Browns lost their 2015 season finale. On January 13, 2016, Hue Jackson was named the Browns' new head coach. He was then fired on October 29, 2018 after only 3 wins in 40 games. He was replaced by defensive coordinator Gregg Williams on an interim basis. On January 9, 2019, Freddie Kitchens was promoted from interim offensive coordinator to head coach.

List of TCU Horned Frogs football seasons

The TCU Horned Frogs are an intercollegiate football team representing Texas Christian University (TCU) in the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since the 2005 college football season, the Horned Frogs have competed as a member of the Mountain West Conference. TCU began playing football in 1896 and has played their home games since 1930 at Amon G. Carter Stadium on the TCU campus. The Horned Frogs compete as members of the Big 12 Conference. Prior to the 2012 season, TCU was a member of the Southwest Conference (SWC) from 1923 to 1995, Western Athletic Conference (WAC) from 1996 to 2000, Conference USA (C-USA) from 2001 to 2004, and the Mountain West Conference (MWC) from 2005 to 2011.

This is a list of their annual results.

Shofner

Shofner is the surname of the following people:

Austin Shofner (1916–1999), United States Marine Corps officer

Del Shofner (born 1934), American football wide receiver

Jim Shofner (born 1935), American football player and coach

Strick Shofner (1919–1998), American major league baseball player

Willis T. Stewart

Willis T. "Slick" Stewart was a college football player and coach. He played for Dan McGugin's Vanderbilt Commodores football teams and coached the Transylvania Pioneers football team.Willis served as the head football coach at Texas Christian University for one season in 1912, achieving a record of 8–1.

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