Jim Rivera

Manuel Joseph "Jim" Rivera (July 22, 1921 – November 13, 2017) was an American professional baseball outfielder. He played for three Major League Baseball (MLB) teams over ten seasons: St. Louis Browns (1952), Chicago White Sox (1952–1961), and Kansas City Athletics (1961).

Jim Rivera
Jim Rivera 1959
Outfielder
Born: July 22, 1921
New York City, New York
Died: November 13, 2017 (aged 96)
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 15, 1952, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1961, for the Kansas City Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.256
Home runs83
Runs batted in422
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Rivera was born to Puerto Rican migrants in New York City. He was first called "Jim" when he was 17, "Big Jim" when he started playing for the Chicago White Sox during the 1952 season, and then "Jungle Jim" in 1953 which was initiated by Chicago Sun-Times sports writer Edgar Munzel.[1] This was due largely to his unorthodox playing style, and for his highly extroverted personality. Rivera threw and batted left-handed; he stood 6 feet tall and weighed 196 pounds during his playing days.

In 1953, he led the American League in triples (16) and in 1955 in stolen bases with 25. He was a sparkplug for the 1950s Go-Go White Sox team which eventually won the American League pennant in 1959.

A smart and fast runner, Rivera ran the bases with abandon, sliding into bases on his belly before it was fashionable, and made many a game-saving catch playing right field. A ground ball hitter, he used his speed to full advantage and was a much tougher in clutch situations. However, in that year's World Series, which the White Sox lost in six games to the Los Angeles Dodgers, Rivera went hitless in 11 at-bats.

Rivera had a .256 lifetime batting average with 83 home runs, 422 RBIs, 503 runs, 155 doubles, and 56 triples in 1,171 games played. He also had a career total of 160 stolen bases and a lifetime .978 fielding average.

At age 40, Rivera appeared in 64 games for the Kansas City A's during the 1961 season, hitting .241 to cap his career. Rivera said Whitey Ford was the "toughest" pitcher he ever faced and he liked it when he was called "Big Jim."

Rivera died on November 13, 2017 at the age of 96.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "'Jungle Jim' Rivera, member of 1959 'Go-Go White Sox,' dies at 96," Chicago Sun-Times, Tuesday, November 14, 2017.
  2. ^ http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/whitesox/ct-spt-white-sox-jim-rivera-obit-20171114-story.html

External links

1952 Chicago White Sox season

The 1952 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 52nd season in the major leagues, and its 53rd season overall. They finished with a record 81–73, good enough for third place in the American League, 14 games behind the 1st place New York Yankees.

1952 St. Louis Browns season

The 1952 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 64 wins and 90 losses. This was the franchise's penultimate season in St. Louis.

1953 Chicago White Sox season

The 1953 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 53rd season in the major leagues, and its 54th season overall. They finished with a record 89–65, good enough for third place in the American League, 11.5 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1954 Caribbean Series

The sixth edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 1954. It was held from February 18 through February 23, featuring the champion baseball teams from Cuba, Alacranes del Almendares; Panama, (Carta Vieja Yankees; Puerto Rico, Criollos de Caguas, and Venezuela, Lácteos de Pastora. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice. The games were played at Sixto Escobar Stadium in San Juan, P.R..

1954 Chicago White Sox season

The 1954 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 54th season in the major leagues, and its 55th season overall. They finished with a record 94–60, good enough for third place in the American League, 17 games behind the first place Cleveland Indians.

1955 Chicago White Sox season

The 1955 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 55th season in the major leagues, and its 56th season overall. They finished with a record 91–63, good enough for third place in the American League, 5 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1955 Major League Baseball season

The 1955 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 11 to October 4, 1955. It featured 16 teams, eight in the National League and eight in the American League, with each team playing a 154-game schedule. In the World Series the Brooklyn Dodgers defeated the New York Yankees 4 games to 3.

For the third consecutive season, a franchise changed homes as the Philadelphia Athletics moved to Kansas City and played their home games at Municipal Stadium.

1956 Chicago White Sox season

The 1956 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 56th season in the major leagues, and its 57th season overall. They finished with a record 85–69, good enough for third place in the American League, 12 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1957 Chicago White Sox season

The 1957 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 57th season in the major leagues, and its 58th season overall. They finished with a record 90–64, good enough for second place in the American League, 8 games behind the first-place New York Yankees.

1958 Chicago White Sox season

The 1958 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 58th season in the major leagues, and its 59th season overall. They finished with a record 82–72, good enough for second place in the American League, 10 games behind the first-place New York Yankees.

1959 Chicago White Sox season

The 1959 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 59th season in the major leagues, and its 60th season overall. They finished with a record 94–60, good enough to win the American League (AL) championship, five games ahead of the second place Cleveland Indians. It was the team's first pennant since 1919 and would be its last until their championship season of 2005.

1960 Chicago White Sox season

The 1960 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 60th season in the major leagues, and its 61st season overall. They finished with a record 87–67, good enough for third place in the American League, 10 games behind the first-place New York Yankees.

1961 Chicago White Sox season

The 1961 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 61st season in the major leagues, and its 62nd season overall. They finished with a record 86–76, good enough for fourth place in the American League, 23 games behind the first-place New York Yankees. Their pitching staff surrendered 13 of Roger Maris's 61 home runs that year, the most of any team.

2003 New Progressive Party of Puerto Rico primaries

The 2003 New Progressive Party primaries were the primary elections by which voters of the New Progressive Party (PNP) chose its nominees for various political offices of Puerto Rico, namely the position of Governor, for the 2004 general elections. Former Governor Pedro Rosselló was selected as the nominee at the primary elections held on November 9, 2003. He would go on to narrowly lose the 2004 general election against Aníbal Acevedo Vilá, from the Popular Democratic Party (PPD).

Al Widmar

Albert Joseph Widmar (March 20, 1925 – October 15, 2005) was an American starting pitcher and a pitching coach in Major League Baseball.

Between 1945 and 1952, Widmar played for the Boston Red Sox (1947), St. Louis Browns (1948, 1950–51) and Chicago White Sox (1952). He batted and threw right-handed. As a coach, Widmar worked with the Philadelphia Phillies, Milwaukee Brewers and Toronto Blue Jays. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio.

In a five-season career, Widmar posted a 13–30 record with 143 strikeouts and a 5.21 ERA in 388.1 innings pitched.

Widmar played part of two Major League seasons as a reliever with the Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Browns. He debuted with the Red Sox in 1947, and was sent to St. Louis before the 1948 season in the same trade that brought Vern Stephens to Boston. After an unspectacular year with the Browns, he was demoted to Baltimore, St. Louis' Triple-A affiliate team.

In 1949, Widmar won 22 games in the International League. A year later, he returned to the Browns as a starter. After going 11–24 in two seasons, he was sent along with Sherm Lollar to the Chicago White Sox for Dick Littlefield, Joe DeMaestri, Gus Niarhos and Jim Rivera. He finished the 1952 season with the Seattle Rainiers in the Pacific Coast League, and remained with the team through half of the 1955 season. At that point, Widmar donned a Tulsa Oilers uniform, and remained with the team as player/manager through 1958.Following his playing career, Widmar became a successful minor league manager for more than a decade. He also was the pitching coach for the Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Brewers, and later became a front office official for Milwaukee.

In 1979, Widmar became the pitching coach of the Toronto Blue Jays; he kept the job for the next ten seasons. In 1985, he guided a rotation that featured Dave Stieb, Doyle Alexander, Jim Clancy and Jimmy Key as the Blue Jays won their first AL East Division title. He was promoted to special assistant to the vice president and general manager in 1991.

Widmar died of colon cancer in Tulsa, Oklahoma, at age 80.

Angel Scull

Angel Scull Saez (October 2, 1928 – February 14, 2005) was a Cuban professional baseball outfielder. Listed at 5' 8", 165 lb., he batted and threw right handed.Born in Matanzas, Scull was known as a line-drive hitter and speedy base runner. In addition, he was a fine defensive player at all three outfield positions, playing mainly as a center fielder for the Alacranes de Almendares during his ten seasons in the Cuban League from 1951–1952 through 1960–1961.Scull was also a member of the Cuban baseball team which won the Gold Medal in the 1951 Pan American Games held in Buenos Aires, Argentina. During the tournament, he led all players in runs batted in (14) and stolen bases (4) while tying for the most home runs (3).Scull won the Cuban League batting crown with a .370 average during the 1954–1955 season. Besides, he captured five stolen base titles from 1953–1954 through 1955–1956 and 1958–1959 to 1959–1960. In a 10-season career, he posted an average of .277 (593-for-2149) with 15 home runs and 207 runs batted in, scoring 299 runs and stealing 87 bases, while collecting 74 doubles and 31 triples.In 1951, Scull trained with the Washington Senators team of the American League then was assigned to Class D Wellsville Rockets, where he hit for a .329 average in 124 games and led the Pony League in stolen bases.

He stayed in the minor leagues through 1969, which included 14 Triple A seasons with the Charleston Senators, Havana Sugar Kings, Toronto Maple Leafs, Montreal Royals, Syracuse Chiefs, Atlanta Crackers, Vancouver Mounties, and Petroleros de Poza Rica.Scull enjoyed a career highlight while playing with Almendares in the 1954 Caribbean Series, when he batted .391 and amassed a .522 slugging average, leading the Series with five runs scored. He also tied with teammate Sam Chapman and Joe Tuminelli of the Panamanian team for the second-best average behind Puerto Rico's outfielder Jim Rivera (.450).In 1997 Scull was enshrined into the Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame based in Miami, Florida.He died in 2005 at the age of 77.

Caribbean Series Most Valuable Player

The Caribbean Series Most Valuable Player is an annual award, given to one outstanding player in the Caribbean Series. Since 1949, it has been awarded by journalists of the countries participating in the tournament.

List of Major League Baseball annual stolen base leaders

Major League Baseball recognizes stolen base leaders in the American League and National League each season.

Tom Wright (baseball)

Thomas Everette Wright (September 22, 1923 – September 5, 2017) was an American professional baseball player. The outfielder, born in Rutherfordton, North Carolina, played all or part of nine seasons in Major League Baseball (1948–56) for four American League teams. He threw right-handed, batted left-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 180 pounds (82 kg) as an active player.

Wright was signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1942. After his first professional season, he entered the United States Army Air Forces, where he served in the Pacific Theater of Operations during World War II and missed the 1943–45 seasons. He returned to baseball in 1946, and led the Class C Carolina League in batting average (.380) and hits (an even 200), while making the CL All-Star team. His performance earned him a three-level promotion to the Double-A Southern Association for 1947, where he batted .325 and was also named an All-Star. Then, in 1948, he hit over .300 (at .307) for a third straight season, this time in the Triple-A American Association. On September 15, 1948, he made his Major League debut with the Red Sox—tripling as a pinch hitter in his first big-league at bat. Wright then returned to Triple-A for the entire 1949 campaign. He won the American Association batting championship (hitting .368) and collected 200 hits, second in the league. During the September 1949 pennant race, he made five pinch-hitting appearances for the Red Sox.

Wright spent all of 1950 on Boston's roster, hitting .318 in part-time and pinch-hitting duty, with 54 games played and 115 plate appearances. Of his 34 hits, only seven went for extra bases, all doubles. He then returned to Triple-A for much of 1951, getting into only 28 games with Boston, 13 as a starting outfielder, and batting only .222. After the season, he was traded to the St. Louis Browns on November 28, 1951. In 1952, Wright would set personal bests in games played (89) and hits (50), but he batted only .253 with two home runs and the Browns traded him after 29 games in St. Louis to the Chicago White Sox on June 15. He was a reserve outfielder for the ChiSox for the next year and a half, playing behind Minnie Miñoso, Sam Mele and Jim Rivera. During spring training on March 27, 1954, he was traded for the third and last time, to the Washington Senators. But Wright was still unable to break into the everyday lineup, appearing in 76 games, half of them as a starting outfielder.

He spent most of 1955 and 1956 in minor league baseball, except for eight appearances as a pinch hitter and one game for Washington as a pinch runner at the tail end of 1955 and the beginning of 1956. On April 18, 1956 he played his final game after nine seasons in the big leagues. Wright retired after the 1957 minor league season.

In 341 MLB games played, Wright registered 175 hits, including 28 doubles and 11 triples, as well as six home runs. He batted .255 lifetime.

Wright died September 5, 2017, aged 93.

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