Jim Ritcher

James Alexander Ritcher (born May 21, 1958) is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive lineman in the National Football League (NFL) for sixteen seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. Ritcher played college football for North Carolina State University, and received All-American honors. He was picked in the first round of the 1980 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Buffalo Bills and Atlanta Falcons of the NFL.

Jim Ritcher
No. 51
Position:Center / Guard
Personal information
Born:May 21, 1958 (age 60)
Berea, Ohio
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:273 lb (124 kg)
Career information
High school:Medina (OH) Highland
College:North Carolina State
NFL Draft:1980 / Round: 1 / Pick: 16
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:218
Games started:167
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Ritcher was born in Berea, Ohio. He attended Highland High School in Medina, Ohio, where he played high school football.

College career

He attended North Carolina State University, and played for the NC State Wolfpack football team from 1976 to 1979. As a senior in 1979, he was a consensus first-team was an All-American and won the Outland Trophy as the nation's best college interior lineman.

Professional career

In the National Football League, Ritcher was moved to guard from center by the Buffalo Bills, for whom he played fourteen seasons. He started in all four Super Bowl appearances of the Bills (Super Bowl XXV, Super Bowl XXVI, Super Bowl XXVII, and Super Bowl XXVIII) and was selected to two Pro Bowls. He finished his career with the Atlanta Falcons.

Life after football

In 1998, he was selected to the College Football Hall of Fame. He is currently working as a commercial pilot, flying for American Airlines.

1978 College Football All-America Team

The 1978 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1978. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1978 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

1979 College Football All-America Team

The 1979 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1979. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1979 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

1980 Buffalo Bills season

The 1980 Buffalo Bills season was the 21st season for the club, and 11th season in the National Football League. Their 11–5 record was tied for best in the AFC.

The Bills' defense allowed only 260 points in 1980, 3rd best in the league. Their 4,101 total yards surrendered were best in the NFL in 1980. Buffalo's defense was well represented on the UPI All-AFC team: nose tackle Fred Smerlas and linebacker Jim Haslett – two thirds of Buffalo's "Bermuda Triangle" with linebacker Shane Nelson – were named to the 1st team All-AFC. Defensive end Ben Williams was named to the second team.

Although Buffalo's offensive statistics were not as impressive as its defense, four offensive players were named All-AFC: left guard Reggie McKenzie, left tackle Ken Jones, wide receiver Jerry Butler and rookie running back Joe Cribbs.Cribbs rushed for 1,185 yards, and made his first Pro Bowl. Jerry Butler and Fred Smerlas also were selected to play in the annual all-star game.

1982 Buffalo Bills season

The 1982 Buffalo Bills season was the franchise's 13th season in the National Football League, and the 23rd overall. Due to the 1982 NFL strike, the season was shortened to only nine games; the Bills' 4–5 record left them in the 9th spot in the AFC, therefore eliminating the Bills from the playoffs in the 16-team tournament format.

The Bills led the league in rushing in 1982, with 1,371 yards (152.3 per game) on the ground.

1985 Buffalo Bills season

The 1985 Buffalo Bills season was the 26th season for the club and its sixteenth in the National Football League (NFL). It was Buffalo’s second-consecutive 2–14 season. Head coach Kay Stephenson was fired after an 0–4 start. Defensive coordinator Hank Bullough took over, going 2–10 for the remainder of the season.

1991 Buffalo Bills season

The 1991 Buffalo Bills season was the 32nd season, and 22nd in the National Football League. The Buffalo Bills finished the National Football League's 1991 season with a record of 13 wins and 3 losses, the same record as their previous season, and finished first in the AFC East division. The Bills qualified for their second Super Bowl appearance, but lost to the Washington Redskins, 24–37.

1992 Buffalo Bills season

The 1992 Buffalo Bills season was the 33rd season for the team in the National Football League. The Buffalo Bills finished the National Football League's 1992 season with a record of 11 wins and 5 losses, and finished second in the AFC East division. The Bills qualified for their third straight Super Bowl appearance, but lost to the Dallas Cowboys 17–52.

1994 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1994 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's 29th season in the National Football League (NFL).

Under head coach June Jones, the Falcons' Run and shoot offense was heavily imbalanced in 1994, in favor of the passing game. Atlanta's passing yardage–4,112 yards—was third in the NFC, and fifth in the league overall; but their rushing yards (1,249, 78.1 yards per game) were dead-last in the league. They had, by far, the fewest rushing attempts in the league in 1994, with only 330 all year.

1995 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1995 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise’s thirtieth season in the National Football League (NFL). The team finished with a 9–7 record, and qualified for the post-season as a wild card.

The Falcons’ pass defense gave up 4,541 yards through the air in 1995, which was a league record until 2011. The Falcons’ defense faced a total of 650 pass attempts, the most all time. The 405 passes completed against Atlanta in 1995 are fifth-most in NFL history. Still, Atlanta's points surrendered was 19th in the league, and its point-differential for the season was +13.

Carter–Finley Stadium

Wayne Day Family Field at Carter–Finley Stadium is home to the NC State Wolfpack football team. It was opened in 1966 and has grown to a seating capacity of 57,583 seats.

Darryl Talley

Darryl Victor Talley (born July 10, 1960) is a former American college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for fourteen seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. He played college football for West Virginia University, and was recognized as an All-American. Talley played professionally for the Buffalo Bills, Atlanta Falcons and Minnesota Vikings of the NFL, and played in four Super Bowls with the Bills.

Dave Rimington

David Brian Rimington (born May 22, 1960) is a former American college and professional football player who was a center in the National Football League (NFL) for seven seasons during the 1980s. Rimington played college football for the University of Nebraska, where he was two-time consensus All-American and received several awards recognizing him as the best college lineman in the country. He was selected in the first round of the 1983 NFL Draft and played professionally for the Cincinnati Bengals and Philadelphia Eagles of the NFL. Rimington is the namesake of the Rimington Trophy, which is awarded annually to the nation's top collegiate center. Rimington was announced as the interim athletic director of Nebraska on September 26, 2017.

Highland High School (Medina County, Ohio)

Highland High School is a public high school in Granger Township, Ohio, United States, near Medina. The school serves students from Hinckley, Granger, Sharon, Montville, Copley, Medina, and Brunswick townships. In May 2013, Highland High School was named one of “America's Best High Schools” by Newsweek in its 2013 rankings.

It is the only high school in the Highland Local School District. The school colors are kelly green and black, and athletic teams are known as the Hornets. The alma mater is to the tune of "Carmen Ohio" and the fight song is the "Notre Dame Victory March".

Highland High School is a comprehensive high school with approximately 1,130 students in grades 9–12 as of 2013.

Joe Thuney

Joseph Thuney ( TOO-nee; born November 16, 1992) is an American football guard for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at NC State.

Kent Hull

James Kent Hull (January 13, 1961 – October 18, 2011) was an American football offensive lineman in the National Football League and United States Football League, more precisely a center for the New Jersey Generals of the USFL and Buffalo Bills of the NFL.

List of Buffalo Bills first-round draft picks

The Buffalo Bills are an American football franchise based in Orchard Park, New York. They are members of the American Football Conference (AFC) East division in the National Football League (NFL).Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. The NFL Draft, as a whole, gives the advantage to the teams that did poorly the previous season. The 30 teams that did not make the Super Bowl are ranked in order so the team with the worst record picks first and the team with the best record pick last. The two exceptions to this inverse order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion selects 32nd overall, and the Super Bowl loser selects 31st overall. If the franchise so chooses, they may trade their draft picks for any combination of draft picks, players, and money.

List of members of the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame

Athletes, coaches, and journalists who have been inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame.

NC State Wolfpack football

The NC State Wolfpack football team represents North Carolina State University in the sport of American football. The Wolfpack competes in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). Prior to joining the ACC in 1953, the Wolfpack were a member of the Southern Conference. As a founding member of the ACC, the Wolfpack has won seven conference championships and participated in 31 bowl games, of which the team has won 17, including eight of their last eleven. NC State is currently coached by Dave Doeren.

Since 1966, the Wolfpack has played its home games at Carter–Finley Stadium. On September 16, 2010, NC State restored the tradition of having a live mascot on the field. A wolf-like Tamaskan Dog named

“Tuffy” was on the sidelines for the Cincinnati game that day in Raleigh and Tuffy has not missed a Wolfpack football game in Carter–Finley Stadium since That day.

Outland Trophy

The Outland Trophy is awarded to the best college football interior lineman in the United States as adjudged by the Football Writers Association of America. It is named after John H. Outland. One of only a few players ever to be named an All-American at two positions, Outland garnered consensus All-America honors in 1898 as a tackle and consensus honors as a halfback in 1899. Outland had always contended that football tackles and guards deserved greater recognition and conceived the Outland Trophy as a means of providing this recognition. In 1988, Jim Ridlon was commissioned to design and sculpt the Outland Trophy. A member of the National College Football Awards Association, the award has become one of college football's most prestigious.

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Conference championships (4)
League championships (2)
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Seasons (58)

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