Jim Otto

James Edwin Otto (born January 5, 1938) is a former professional American football center for the Oakland Raiders of the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL).

Jim Otto
refer to caption
Otto on the Oakland Raiders
No. 00, 50
Position:Center
Personal information
Born:January 5, 1938 (age 81)
Wausau, Wisconsin
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:255 lb (116 kg)
Career information
High school:Wausau East
(Wausau, Wisconsin)
College:Miami (FL)
AFL draft:1960 / Round: 2
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:210
Games started:207
Fumble recoveries:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Otto played high school football at Wisconsin's Wausau High School, under coach Win Brockmeyer. He then went on to play collegiate football at the University of Miami, where he joined the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. In addition to playing offensive center at UM, he also played linebacker on defense.

Professional career

No National Football League team showed interest in the undersized center. Otto was drafted by the proposed Minneapolis franchise of the new American Football League. When the Minneapolis contingent reneged to accept an NFL franchise, Otto's rights defaulted to the AFL's Oakland Raiders. He then signed with the Raiders and played for the entire ten years of the league's existence and five years beyond. He was issued jersey number 50 for the AFL's inaugural season, 1960, but switched to his familiar 00 the next season. Otto worked diligently to build his body up to his playing weight of 256 pounds.

For the next 15 years, Otto became a fixture at center for the Raiders, never missing a single game due to injury, and played in 210 consecutive games. He won one AFL/AFC championship in 1967 against the Houston Oilers with the Raiders, but lost five: in 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, and 1974 to the New York Jets, Kansas City Chiefs, Baltimore Colts, Miami Dolphins, and Pittsburgh Steelers, respectively, with all five teams winning the Super Bowl. He played alongside Gene Upshaw, another Hall of Famer, at left guard from 1967 to 1974.[1] In the 1967 regular season, Oakland scored 468 points (33.4 points/game), leading the AFL, but lost Super Bowl II to the Green Bay Packers. In the 1968 regular season, Oakland scored 453 points (32.4 points/game), again leading the AFL, and beat the Kansas City Chiefs in the divisional round before losing to the Jets. In the 1969 regular season, Oakland scored 377 points (26.9 points/game) to lead the AFL for the third consecutive year, and beat the Houston Oilers in the divisional round of the playoffs before losing to the Chiefs. In the 1970 regular season, the first year of the NFL-AFL merger, Oakland scored 300 points (21.4 points/game), ranking ninth in the 26 team NFL, and beat the Miami Dolphins in the 1970-71 NFL playoffs before losing to the Colts. The Raiders missed the playoffs for the first time in 5 years in 1971, despite scoring 344 points (24.6 points/game), second highest in the NFL.

The Raiders came back stronger in 1972, scoring 365 points (26.1 points/game), ranking third in the NFL, but lost 13-7 to the Pittsburgh Steelers in the divisional round of the 1972-73 NFL playoffs, the famous Immaculate Reception game, in which Otto also made the only pass reception of his professional career. In the 1973 regular season, Oakland scored 292 points (20.9 points/game), tenth in the NFL, and avenged their defeat to the Steelers during the 1972-73 NFL playoffs before losing to the Dolphins. In Otto's final year, 1974, Oakland scored 355 points (25.4 points/game), leading the NFL, and avenged their loss to the Dolphins during 1973-74 NFL playoffs before losing to the Steelers again. In 1975, he was replaced by Dave Dalby. He was the last member of the Oakland Raiders inaugural team from 1960 to retire.

Otto was one of only 20 players to play for the entire 10-year existence of the American Football League, and one of only three players to play in all of his team's AFL games. Otto was also selected as the Sporting News All-League center from 1960 through 1969. He was an All-Star in the first 13 of his 15 seasons – every year in the AFL from 1960 through 1969 and three of his five seasons in the NFL. He was also named the starting center on the AFL All-Time Team.

He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1980, the first year he was eligible. In 1999, he was ranked number 78 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.

Injuries and operations

Otto's body was punished greatly during his NFL career, resulting in nearly 74 operations, including 28 on his knee (nine of them during his playing career) and multiple joint replacements. His joints became riddled with arthritis, and he developed debilitating back and neck problems.[2] In his book, "The Pain of Glory" Otto described near death experiences from medical procedures, including fighting off three life-threatening infections due to complications from his artificial joints. During one six-month stretch, he was without a right knee joint because he had to wait for an infection to heal before another artificial knee could be implanted. Otto eventually had to have his right leg amputated on August 1, 2007.[3] Despite his maladies, Otto says he has no regrets and wouldn't change a thing even if given the opportunity to do it over again. He discussed his sports injuries as well as the concussions issue in a 2013 Frontline interview for "League of Denial: The NFL's Concussion Crisis".[4]

Personal life

Otto was also the subject of 'The Jim Otto Suite', a series of three multimedia works by American contemporary artist Matthew Barney which served as a precursor to The Cremaster Cycle.[5]

He was elected to the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame in 1998.

See also

References

  • Jim Otto: The Pain of Glory by Jim Otto
  • Jim Otto by Dave Newhouse
  1. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/U/UpshGe00.htm
  2. ^ "The Frontline Interview: Jim Otto \ League of Denial: The NFL's Concussion Crisis". PBS Frontline. 2013.
  3. ^ "Hall of Famer Jim Otto recovering after having right leg amputated". Yahoo! Sports. August 1, 2007.
  4. ^ The Frontline Interview: Jim Otto
  5. ^ "Art Now: Matthew Barney: OTTOshaft". Tate Britain.

External links

00

00, a double zero, may refer to:

'00, album by the alternative rock band Judybats, released in 2000

The year 2000

00 Agent, an agent with a license to kill in the James Bond media

00 gauge, a standard of model railways

Size 00, a women's clothing size in the US catalog sizes system

Symphony No. 00 (Bruckner), an alternate name for Anton Bruckner's Study Symphony in F minor

Mobile Suit Gundam 00, an anime series

00, an abbreviation used on signs to indicate a public toilet (particularly in Germany and Eastern Europe)

00, a common international call prefix

00, a wire diameter defined by the American wire gauge standard

00, a fine grade of steel wool

00, a field on the wheel of some roulette game tables

00, an Italian type number for Flour

00, a unique squad number, notably worn by:

Martin Biron, and John Davidson in the NHL

Jim Otto, and Ken Burrough in the AFL and NFL

Robert Parish, and Greg Ostertag in the NBA

David Reutimann (born 1970) in NASCAR

A shotgun ammunition size for buckshot, about equal to 8.452 mm (.33") in diameter

1958 Miami Hurricanes football team

The 1958 Miami Hurricanes football team represented the University of Miami during the 1958 NCAA University Division football season. The Hurricanes played their home games at the Burdine Stadium in Miami, Florida. The team was coached by Andy Gustafson, in his eleventh year as head coach for the Hurricanes.

1960 All-AFL Team

The 1960 American Football League All-League Team was selected after the 1960 American Football League (AFL) season by three separate entities: current AFL players, the Associated Press (AP), and United Press International (UPI), and was published by The Sporting News. Each selector chose a first-team, and the AFL players and UPI also selected second-teams at some positions.

1960 American Football League draft

The 1960 American Football League draft was held on November 22–23, 1959, in Minneapolis, shortly after the organization of the league, and lasted 33 rounds. An additional draft of 20 rounds was held by the AFL on December 2.

1960 NFL Draft

The 1960 National Football League Draft in which NFL teams take turns selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players, was held at the Warwick Hotel in Philadelphia on November 30, 1959. Many players, including half of those drafted in the first round, signed with teams in the newly created American Football League, including the first overall pick and Heisman Trophy winner Billy Cannon. At the time of the draft, the Cardinals were still the Chicago Cardinals; they moved to St. Louis in March 1960. The Dallas Cowboys were enfranchised in January 1960 after the draft.

1968 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1968 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

AFL and NFL era competitive college drafts

During the first seven years of existence (1960–1966) of the American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969), the AFL and the NFL held separate, competing drafts for college football talent.

These drafts were conducted differently in each league, with the AFL, as a new league, starting its existence with the 1960 AFL draft that was actually held in December, 1959 and had 33 rounds. Each AFL team had "territorial rights" to players from its general region for a "bonus" draft selection, so that teams could sign players who were known to their fans. These were not "picked" as such, but agreed on by consensus. The 1960 AFL draft proceeded with teams selecting by lot and player position, e.g., each team selected quarterbacks from the available list, then running backs, etc. These were not listed in order of selection, but alphabetically in two groups called "First Selections" and "Second Selections" by each team. Minneapolis-Saint Paul was originally included in the AFL draft on November 22, 1959. When the Minneapolis-Saint Paul owners reneged on their agreement to join the AFL and jumped to the NFL, some of the remaining AFL teams signed several players from the deserters' draft list. To compensate for this, after the Oakland Raiders' AFL franchise was granted, an allocation draft was held, to permit the Raiders to stock their team with players from the other seven AFL teams.

The established NFL held drafts more similar to the present day, in which the team with the worst record from the previous year selected first, and the reigning league champion selected last. Starting in 1961, the AFL also followed this procedure.

Because of the competition between the leagues, unlike today's drafts, they were held soon after the end of the football season in each league, often before the college bowls were over. Many players, such as LSU's Billy Cannon signed pro contracts "under the goalposts" at bowl games; and in the College East-West Game and other all-star college bowls, many players wore the helmets of the professional team that they had signed with.

The AFL was at a disadvantage in name-recognition with the established NFL, but contrary to common belief, during this period, its franchises signed a significant number of stars away from the older league. These included Cannon, as well as eventual Hall of Famers Lance Alworth, Buck Buchanan, Jim Otto, Billy Shaw, and Nick Buoniconti, and such standouts as Matt Snell, Tom Sestak, Charley Hennigan, Abner Haynes, Johnny Robinson and many others.

American Football League draft

The American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969) stocked its teams in two ways:

Signing free agents (players whose contracts in other professional football leagues had expired, or who had no professional experience).

Signing players from the previous year's college graduates.The latter option involved a "draft" in which each team selected players who then were not available for other teams to select. The draft for the 1960 season was actually conducted in late 1959, shortly after the formation of the league. Thereafter, American Football League drafts were conducted separately from the rival NFL through 1966. Starting in 1967, after the NFL agreed to merge with the AFL, the two leagues conducted a "common draft".

In 1961 and 1962, the American Football League drafts were "regional". Teams were assigned broad geographical regions around their home city, and had "rights" to the players within those regions. The AFL's owners reckoned that players would be more willing to play in their league if they had the opportunity to sign with their "home town" teams, and also hoped to attract fans with players with whom they had some familiarity. The AFL also tapped sources which the NFL had disdained: small colleges and all-black colleges.

During the years in which the American Football League was in direct competition with the NFL for players (and fans), numerous star players chose to play in the AFL. The first and one of the most prominent of these was LSU All-American Billy Cannon, who went on to become an AFL All-Star both as a running back with the Houston Oilers and as a tight end with the Oakland Raiders. Other greats signed by the AFL in the years before the common draft included Abner Haynes and Johnny Robinson (Dallas Texans); Jim Otto (Oakland Raiders); Lance Alworth, John Hadl, and Ron Mix (San Diego Chargers), Lionel Taylor (Denver Broncos); Billy Shaw (Buffalo Bills); Larry Grantham (New York Titans); Matt Snell and Joe Namath (New York Jets); Nick Buoniconti (Boston Patriots) and a host of others.

Bob Brown (offensive lineman)

Robert Stanford Brown (born December 8, 1941), nicknamed "The Boomer" is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League from 1964 through 1973. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles as the second overall pick in the 1964 NFL draft. He played for the Eagles from 1964 to 1968, the Los Angeles Rams from 1969 to 1970, and the Oakland Raiders from 1971 to 1973. He played college football at Nebraska. Brown was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2004.

California Sports Hall of Fame

The California Sports Hall of Fame recognizes athletes, coaches, and members of sports media who have made a "lasting impression to California sports". It was established in 2006 by Christian Okoye, former All-Pro running back for the Kansas City Chiefs. The California Sports Hall of Fame made its first Induction in January 2007. Okoye was inducted in 2016.

Dave Dalby

David Merle Dalby (October 19, 1950 – August 30, 2002) was an American football center.

Dalby was a star linemen at center and defensive end, who led his high school football team, the La Serna Lancers, of Whittier, California, to the California Scholastic Federation AAA Football Championship in 1967. An All Around athlete in high school, Dalby also played basketball and baseball at La Serna High School.

Don Mosebar

Donald Howard Mosebar (born September 11, 1961) is a former American college and professional football player who was a Center in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. He played college football for the University of Southern California, and earned All-American honors. Mosebar was selected in the first round of the 1983 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the NFL's Los Angeles Raiders.

Ken Burrough

Kenneth Othell Burrough (born July 14, 1948) is a former professional American football player who at 6'4", 210 lb (95 kg) primarily played wide receiver with the Houston Oilers in the National Football League (NFL). He was a track star and played quarterback at William M. Raines High School in Jacksonville, Florida, and played wide receiver at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas, being named an All-American in 1969.Burrough was selected by the New Orleans Saints in the first round (10th overall) of the 1970 NFL Draft. That first season, he missed much playing time due to minor injuries and only caught 13 passes for 196 yards and two touchdowns. In January 1971, a trade was announced in which Burrough and fellow Saint player Dave Rowe went to the Oilers in exchange for Hoyle Granger, Terry Stoepel, Charles Blossom, and a draft choice to be named later.Burrough played eleven seasons with the Oilers from 1971 through the 1981 season. In 1975, Burrough was selected to the Pro Bowl, leading all NFL wide receivers with 1,063 receiving yards and in fact was the only receiver to gain more than a thousand yards for the season. He scored eight touchdowns for the season and averaged 20.1 yards per reception. In his book More Distant Memories: Pro Football's Best Ever Players of the 50's, 60's, and 70's, Danny Jones wrote that Burrough was "one of the most dangerous game breakers in the NFL along with Cliff Branch [Raiders], Mel Gray [Cardinals], and O.J. Simpson [Bills]." Six of Burrough's eight touchdowns were of 50 or greater yards. In a week thirteen game against the playoff-bound Raiders, Burrough caught four passes for 112 yards and two touchdowns, including a screen pass from quarterback Dan Pastorini which he converted to a 68-yard touchdown by displaying his open field running skills.Burrough was also selected to the Pro Bowl in 1977. The Oilers won post-season games in 1978 and 1979 seasons, making it to the AFC Championship both years.

Burrough was the last NFL player to wear number 00 on his jersey; the league restricted all numbers to between 1 and 89 in 1973 (later expanded to 1 and 99 in 1987), but Burrough and Jim Otto, both of whom wore 00 at the time, were covered under a grandfather clause for the rest of their careers.Burrough ranks 85th on NFL All-Time Yards per Reception List with 16.9 yards per pass reception.

In 2016, Burrough was inducted into the Black College Football Hall of Fame.

List of Miami Hurricanes in the NFL

The University of Miami's football program has set multiple records in producing players who go on to play in the National Football League (NFL), leading some to deem the University "NFL U".

List of National Football League retired numbers

Teams in the National Football League (NFL) retire jersey numbers of players who either are considered by the team to have made significant contributions to that team's success, or who have experienced untimely deaths during their playing career. As with other leagues, once a team retires a player's jersey number, it never issues the number to any other player, unless the player or team explicitly allows it.

Since NFL teams began retiring numbers, 139 players have had their jersey number retired. The Chicago Bears have the most retired numbers of any team with 14. Only one player, Reggie White, has had their number retired by two teams. Three teams – the Oakland Raiders, the Atlanta Falcons, and the Dallas Cowboys – traditionally do not retire jersey numbers, and two others – the Washington Redskins and the Pittsburgh Steelers – only do so in extremely rare circumstances. Also without a retired jersey number are the Baltimore Ravens, the Houston Texans, and the Jacksonville Jaguars, although those teams are less than 25 years old (although some numbers have been placed out of circulation).Unlike Major League Baseball (which retired Jackie Robinson's number) and the National Hockey League (which did so for Wayne Gretzky), the NFL has never retired a jersey number league-wide in honor of anyone. Numbers 0 and 00 are no longer allowed, but were not retired in honor of any particular player, since the NFL's positional numbering system, imposed in 1973, does not allocate a position for players wearing those numbers (the NFL allowed those numbers in the past; Johnny Olszewski, Obert Logan, Jim Otto and Ken Burrough all wore 0 or 00). The numbers can be, and rarely are, used in the preseason when no other numbers for a player's position are available.

List of most consecutive starts and games played by National Football League players

This is a list of the most consecutive starts and games played by a player by position in the NFL.Brett Favre's starts streak of 297 games is the longest all-time. Among defensive players, Jim Marshall's starts streak of 270 is the longest all-time. Of special note is punter Jeff Feagles, who played in 352 consecutive games which is the longest of all-time for a special teams player. Special teams players are not credited with starts in the NFL. In 2018, Ryan Kerrigan became the most recent player to surpass someone at his position for consecutive starts, having broken the previous mark for left outside linebackers previously held by Jason Gildon.Updated through 2018 season

Bold denotes an active streak

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