Jim Lonborg

James Reynold Lonborg (born April 16, 1942) is an American former professional baseball right-handed starting pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Boston Red Sox (19651971), Milwaukee Brewers (1972), and Philadelphia Phillies (19731979). Though nicknamed "Gentleman Jim", he was known for fearlessly pitching on the inside of the plate, throughout his fifteen-year career.

Born in Santa Maria, California, Lonborg graduated from Stanford University. On August 14, 1963, he was signed as an amateur free agent by the Red Sox.

Lonborg enjoyed his best year in the 1967 Carl Yastrzemski-led Red Sox's "Impossible Dream" season, when he led American League (AL) pitchers in wins (22), games started (39), and strikeouts (246). That year, the Red Sox were involved in a four-way race for the AL pennant with the Detroit Tigers, Minnesota Twins, and Chicago White Sox; the race was reduced to three teams after the White Sox lost a doubleheader to the Kansas City Athletics, on September 27. The Red Sox and Twins faced each other in the season's final series and entered the final day (October 1) tied for first place; the Tigers were half a game out of first and needed to sweep a doubleheader from the California Angels to force a playoff between the winner of the Red Sox–Twins game. Lonborg outdueled Twins ace Dean Chance in that finale, while the Tigers defeated the Angels in the first game but lost the second, putting the Red Sox in the World Series for the first time since 1946. In that World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Lonborg pitched game two, tossing what was only the fourth one-hitter in Series history and followed that up with another victory in game five by limiting the Cards to three hits. Called upon to pitch the seventh and deciding game with only 2 days' rest, he lasted 6 innings, but allowed 6 earned runs in a 7–2 loss. In addition, Lonborg received the 1967 Cy Young Award (becoming the first Red Sox pitcher so honored), played in the All-Star Game, and finished prominently in voting for the MLB Most Valuable Player (MVP) award (placing 6th in the voting, with teammate Yastrzemski winning the award).

Jim Lonborg 1971
Lonborg in 1971

In December 1967, Lonborg tore the ligaments in his left knee while skiing[1] and his pitching career thereafter was marked by many injuries.[2] He won only 27 games from 1968 through 1971 and was traded to the Milwaukee Brewers after the 1971 season. While Lonborg performed well for Milwaukee in 1972, the team traded him in October to the Phillies.[3] He spent the next six and a half seasons with Philadelphia before his release, midway through the 1979 season.

Lonborg‘s MLB career statistical totals include: a 157–137 record, with 1,475 strikeouts, a 3.86 earned run average (ERA), 90 complete games, 15 shutouts, and 2,464.1 innings, in 425 games.

After retiring, Lonborg attended the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, and graduated in 1983. He worked as a general dentist in Hanover, Massachusetts until he retired in 2017. He is active in many nonprofit organizations, including Catholic Charities, Little League Baseball, and The Jimmy Fund. Lonborg currently lives in Scituate, Massachusetts.

Lonborg was selected to the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, in 2002.

On the Boston-based sitcom Cheers, the photo of Sam Malone pitching is actually that of Lonborg. At times, Sam also wore Lonborg's number 16 BoSox jersey.

Jim Lonborg
Jim Lonborg 1969
Lonborg in 1969
Pitcher
Born: April 16, 1942 (age 77)
Santa Maria, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 23, 1965, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
June 10, 1979, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record157–137
Earned run average3.86
Strikeouts1,475
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Jim Lonborg hurt skiing
  2. ^ Hurford, Daphne (31 May 1976). "A Gentler Style for a Gentleman". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 16 July 2011.
  3. ^ Phils trade Money, others

External links

1967 Boston Red Sox season

The 1967 Boston Red Sox season was the 67th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses. The season had one of the most memorable finishes in baseball history, as the AL pennant race went to the very last game, with the Red Sox beating out the Detroit Tigers and Minnesota Twins by one game. Often referred to as The Impossible Dream, this was the team's first winning season since 1958, as the Red Sox shocked all of New England and the rest of the baseball world by reaching the World Series for the first time since 1946. The Red Sox faced the National League champion St. Louis Cardinals in the 1967 World Series, which they lost to the Cardinals in seven games.

1967 Major League Baseball season

The 1967 Major League Baseball season was contested from April 10 to October 12, 1967. The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Boston Red Sox four games to three in the World Series, which was the first World Series appearance for the Red Sox in 21 years. Following the season, the Kansas City Athletics relocated to Oakland.

1967 World Series

The 1967 World Series matched the St. Louis Cardinals against the Boston Red Sox in a rematch of the 1946 World Series, with the Cardinals winning in seven games for their second championship in four years and their eighth overall. The Series was played from October 4 to 12 in Fenway Park and Busch Memorial Stadium.

1967 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1967 throughout the world.

1972 Boston Red Sox season

The 1972 Boston Red Sox season was the 72nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 85 wins and 70 losses, ½ game behind the Detroit Tigers. Due to the cancellation of games missed during the 1972 Major League Baseball strike, Detroit played (and won) one more game than Boston, allowing them to finish with a record of 86–70, winning the division by ½ game.

1972 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1972 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing sixth in the American League East with a record of 65 wins and 91 losses. Because of the move of the Washington Senators to Texas, the Brewers shifted from the AL West to the AL East.

1973 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1973 Milwaukee Brewers season involved the Brewers' finishing fifth in the American League East with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses.

1973 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1973 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 91st season in the history of the franchise. The team, managed by Danny Ozark, played their third season at Veterans Stadium and finished last in the National League East, 11​1⁄2 games behind the Mets.

1974 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1974 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 92nd season in franchise history. The Phillies finished in third place in the National League East with a record of 80 wins and 82 losses. They would not finish below .500 again until going 75–87 in 1985.

1975 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1975 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 93rd in the history of the franchise. The Phillies finished in second place in the National League East with a record of 86–76, 6​1⁄2 games behind the NL East champion Pittsburgh Pirates. As a result, the Phillies had their first winning season in eight years.

1976 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1976 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds entered the season as the reigning world champs. The Reds dominated the league all season, and won their second consecutive National League West title with a record of 102–60, best record in MLB and finished 10 games ahead of the runner-up Los Angeles Dodgers. They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees. They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants. The Reds drew 2,629,708 fans to their home games at Riverfront Stadium, an all-time franchise attendance record. As mentioned above, the Reds swept through the entire postseason with their sweeps of the Phillies and Yankees, achieving a record of 7-0. As of 2018, the Reds are the only team in baseball history to sweep through an entire postseason since the addition of divisions.

1976 National League Championship Series

The 1976 National League Championship Series faced off the Cincinnati Reds (known for their nickname at the time, The Big Red Machine) and the Philadelphia Phillies. The Reds swept the best-of-five series in three games, winning easily in the first two games, and in their last at bat in Game 3.

Stars of the series for the Reds included batters Johnny Bench (4 for 12, HR), Dave Concepción (4 runs scored), George Foster (2 H, both home runs), Ken Griffey (5 for 13, triple), Pete Rose (6 for 14, 2 RBIs, 3 runs scored), and pitchers Don Gullett (win, 8 IP, 2 hits), Pedro Borbón (​4 1⁄3 IP, 0.00 ERA), and Pat Zachry (win, 5 IP, 3 SO).

1976 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1976 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 94th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their first National League East title, as they compiled a record of 101–61, nine games ahead of the second-place Pittsburgh Pirates, and won 100 games or more for the first time in franchise history.

The Phillies lost the NLCS, 3–0 to the Cincinnati Reds. Danny Ozark managed the Phillies, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium, where the All-Star Game was played that season.

1977 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1977 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 95th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their second consecutive National League East division title with a record of 101–61, five games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Phillies lost the NLCS to the Los Angeles Dodgers, three games to one. The Phillies were managed by Danny Ozark, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

1978 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1978 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 96th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their third straight National League East title with a record of 90-72, a game and a half over the Pittsburgh Pirates, as the Phillies defeated the Pirates in Pittsburgh on the next to last day of the season. For the third consecutive season the Phillies came up short in the NLCS, as the Los Angeles Dodgers defeated them three games to one, as they had the previous season. The Phillies were managed by Danny Ozark and played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

1985 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1985 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected two, Lou Brock and Hoyt Wilhelm.

The BBWAA petitioned the Hall of Fame Board of Directors to reconsider the eligibility of Ken Boyer, Curt Flood and Ron Santo with the intention of restoring their names to the 1985 ballot. Each had failed to achieve 5% in their first years on the ballot (Boyer, 1975–79, Flood, 1977–79 and Santo, 1980). The Board approved and Boyer, Flood and Santo returned to the ballot.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It also selected two players, Enos Slaughter and Arky Vaughan.

Bill Champion (baseball)

Buford Billy Champion (September 18, 1947 – January 7, 2017), was an American professional baseball right-handed pitcher, coach, and scout, who played in 202 games in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Brewers, from 1969–1976.

Before his big league debut, in 1969, Champion was already a two-time Minor League Baseball (MiLB) earned run average (ERA) league leader: Huron Phillies, Northern League (1965); and Tidewater Tides, Carolina League (1968). He was part of the trade that brought Don Money to Milwaukee, as the Phillies traded Champion, Money, and John Vukovich to Milwaukee, for pitchers Jim Lonborg, Ken Sanders, Ken Brett, and Earl Stephenson, on October 31, 1972. Champion went on to become a scout for the Chicago Cubs and pitching coach for the Greenville Braves.Champion died on January 7, 2017, in Shelby, North Carolina, at the age of 69.

Billy Conigliaro

William Michael Conigliaro (born August 15, 1947 in Revere, Massachusetts) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who played in the American League for the Boston Red Sox (1969–1971), Milwaukee Brewers (1972) and Oakland Athletics (1973). He is the younger brother of Tony Conigliaro; Billy and Tony were Red Sox teammates in 1969 and 1970.

Conigliaro showed great promise as a hitter in his years in Boston, with 16 doubles and 18 home runs in 1970, and 26 doubles and 11 home runs in 1971. He finished 8th in the American League in doubles in 1971, his most productive year in the majors. In 1970, he was 10th in American League in being hit by pitches with 7. His most memorable game may have been on July 4, 1970, when both Billy and Tony homered against the Cleveland Indians.

After the 1971 season, Billy was traded from the Red Sox to the Brewers in a blockbuster deal that also included Ken Brett, Jim Lonborg, George Scott, Tommy Harper and Marty Pattin. Billy, who idolized his older brother Tony, had been highly critical of the Red Sox for trading his brother to the Angels, especially after Tony's remarkable 36 home runs during the 1970 season after his famous "beaning" incident in 1967. Unhappy in Milwaukee, he announced his retirement from baseball in the middle of the 1972 season. He came back to baseball in 1973 as a part-time player with the eventual World Champion Athletics, making brief appearances in the American League Championship Series and the World Series. Once again Billy became disgruntled with ownership — this time in Oakland — and retired at the conclusion of that season. He attempted a comeback with the A's several years later, but ultimately retired for good after being assigned to their Triple A affiliate on what was to be a "temporary" basis.

He was an early pupil of Shotokan karate grandmaster, Kazumi Tabata, who acknowledges him in his book.

Danny Doyle (baseball)

Howard James "Danny" Doyle (January 24, 1917 – December 14, 2004) was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played briefly for the Boston Red Sox during the 1943 season. Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 195 lb. Doyle was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was born in McLoud, Oklahoma.Doyle attended Oklahoma State University, where he earned seven letters – four in basketball and three in baseball. He entered the majors in August 1943 with the Red Sox, appearing in 13 games while hitting a .209 batting average (9-for-43) with six RBI, two runs, and one double without home runs.

After that, Doyle enrolled the USAF during World War II and never appeared in a major league game again. He served from 1944 to 1946 and received a service related disability that would keep him from playing again. Then, he returned to Oklahoma State and worked as an assistant coach before become the basketball and baseball coach at Auburn University from 1947-49.

Doyle became a successful scout for the Boston Red Sox almost continuously since 1949 (he spent one season, 1965, as a scout for the New York Yankees). Some of his signings included Jim Lonborg, Roger Clemens and Ellis Burks. In 1988, he was named MLB's National Scout of the Year. He also was a member of the Oklahoma State University Baseball Hall of Fame. In March 2009 Doyle was named the "Best Athlete to wear #24 in Oklahoma State history" by GoPokes magazine.

Doyle died in Stillwater, Oklahoma, at the age of 87.

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