Jim Grabowski

James Steven “Wolf” Grabowski (born September 9, 1944) is a former American football player and broadcaster. He played college football at the University of Illinois and professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Bears. He was an analyst on Illinois football radio broadcasts for nearly 30 years, retiring after the 2006 season.

Jim Grabowski
No. 33
Born:September 9, 1944 (age 74)
Chicago, Illinois
Career information
Position(s)Running back
Height6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight220 lb (100 kg)
CollegeIllinois
High schoolChicago Taft (IL)
NFL draft1966 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9
Career history
As player
(19661970)Green Bay Packers
(1971)Chicago Bears
Career stats
Rushing yards1,731
Rush attempts475
Rushing TDs8
Receiving yards675
Receptions82

Collegiate playing career

Grabowski entered the University of Illinois in 1962, out of Taft High School in Chicago. At Illinois, Grabowski was a star running back, and was named Associated Press All-American in both 1964 and 1965. As a sophomore in 1963, Grabowski was named Most Valuable Player of the Rose Bowl, after leading the Fighting Illini to a 17–7 comeback victory over the Washington Huskies.[1] Grabowski received many awards and recognitions after his senior season in 1965, including finishing third in the Heisman Trophy voting, being named The Sporting News co-player of the year and Back of the Year by the Washington Touchdown Club, and receiving the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten Conference Most Valuable Player. He finished as the all-time leader in rushing yards in Big Ten history. Grabowski was also an outstanding student at the University of Illinois, having been named GTE Academic All-American in 1964 and 1965, and graduated with a degree in finance in 1966.

Grabowski is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame, inducted in 1995. He was also inducted into the GTE Academic All-American Hall of Fame and the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame. Additionally, Grabowski was named to the University of Illinois "All-Century" team, and is a member of the National Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame.

  • 1963: 141 carries for 616 yards and 7 TD. 3 catches for 21 yards.[2]
  • 1964: 186 carries for 1004 yards and 10 TD. 9 catches for 101 yards.
  • 1965: 252 carries for 1258 yards and 7 TD. 3 catches for 22 yards.

Professional playing career

After graduation, Grabowski was selected in the first round of the 1966 NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers, with the ninth overall selection. (Grabowski was also taken as the first overall pick in the AFL draft, by the expansion Miami Dolphins.)[3] Grabowski played five seasons for the Packers, and was known as one of Green Bay's "Gold Dust Twins" (along with fellow rookie running back Donny Anderson) in the late Sixties.[4][5]

After gaining the starting position in 1967, a series of injuries hampered his career. With a new head coach in 1971, Grabowski was waived by Green Bay in August,[6][7] picked up by the Chicago Bears for the season, and retired in training camp in September 1972.[8] Over his six seasons in the NFL, Grabowski rushed for 1,731 yards and scored 11 touchdowns, 8 rushing and 3 receiving.

References

  1. ^ Myers, Bob (January 2, 1964). "Illinois' Jim Grabowski, smart defense defeat crippled, gallant Washington 17-7". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. Associated Press. p. 16.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-06-03. Retrieved 2015-05-16.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Miami grabs Jim Grabowski". Palm Beach Post. Florida. Associated Press. November 28, 1965. p. D1.
  4. ^ Lea, Bud (October 20, 1966). "Donny, Jim may see more play". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 2.
  5. ^ Gross, Milton (October 23, 1967). "Jim Grabowski makes amends with Packers". Pittsburgh Press. North American Alliance. p. 47.
  6. ^ Lea, Bud (August 19, 1971). "Grabowski, Clancy cut by Packers". Milwaukee Sentinel. p. 1, part 2.
  7. ^ "Pack asks waivers on Jim Grabowski". Schenectady Gazette. New York. Associated Press. August 19, 1971. p. 41.
  8. ^ "Jim Grabowski quits pro ball". Bryan Times. Ohio. UPI. September 2, 1971. p. 7.

External links

1963 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1963 Big Ten Conference football season was the 68th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1963 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Pete Elliott, won the Big Ten football championship with a record of 8–1–1, defeated Washington in the 1964 Rose Bowl, and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. Illinois center Dick Butkus received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football award as the most valuable player in the conference and was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1963 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 6–2–1 record, finished in second place in the conference, led the conference in scoring defense (7.0 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll. Halfback Sherman Lewis was a consensus first-team All-American and finished third in the voting of the 1963 Heisman Trophy.

The Big Ten's statistical leaders included Tom Myers of Northwestern with 1,398 passing yards, Tom Nowatzke of Indiana with 756 rushing yards, and Paul Krause of Iowa with 442 receiving yards. Carl Eller of Minnesota was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1964 NFL Draft with the sixth overall pick.

1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1963 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1963 Big Ten Conference football season. In their fourth year under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled an 8–1–1 record, finished in first place in the Big Ten Conference, were ranked #3 in the final AP Poll, and defeated Washington in the 1964 Rose Bowl. The sole loss was a 14-8 defeat against Michigan.Illinois center/linebacker Dick Butkus was selected as the team's most valuable player, won the 1963 Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player, and was honored as a unanimous first-team player on the 1963 College Football All-America Team. Tackle Archie Sutton was selected by the Newspaper Enterprise Association as a second-team All-American.Quarterback Mike Taliaferro led the team with 450 passing yards while Jim Grabowski led the team with 616 rushing yards. Gregg Schumacher led the team with 133 receiving yards.

1964 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1964 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1964 Big Ten Conference football season. The selectors for the 1964 season were the Associated Press (AP), based on a vote by media members, and the United Press International (UPI), based on a vote of the conference coaches. Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

Michigan won the Big Ten Conference championship for the first time since 1950, defeated Oregon State in the 1965 Rose Bowl, and had five players who were selected as first-team honorees by either the AP or UPI. Two Michigan players were consensus first-team picks by the AP and UPI: quarterback Bob Timberlake and defensive tackle Bill Yearby. Timberlake also received both the Chic Harley Award as the college football player of the year and the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference.

Ohio State finished in second place in the conference and had six players who were selected as first-team players by either the AP or UPI teams. Three of the Ohio State honorees were consensus picks by the AP and UPI: offensive guard Dan Poretta, linebacker Dwight "Ike" Kelly, and defensive back Arnie Chonko.

Nine players from teams other than Michigan and Ohio State received consensus All-Big Ten honors in 1964. They are: (1) Illinois linebacker, Dick Butkus, who was a consensus All-American and was named Sporting News College Football Player of the Year; (2) Illinois fullback and College Football Hall of Fame inductee Jim Grabowski; (3) Michigan State halfback Dick Gordon; (4) Iowa end Karl Noonan; (5) Indiana end Bill Malinchak; (6) Illinois' offensive tackle Archie Sutton; (7) Indiana guard Don Croftcheck; (8) Northwestern center Joe Cerne; (9) Purdue defensive tackle Jim Garcia; and (10) Illinois defensive back George Donnelly.

1964 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1964 Big Ten Conference football season was the 69th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1964 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1964 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bump Elliott, won the Big Ten football championship, compiled a 9–1 record, led the conference in both scoring offense (23.5 points per game) and scoring defense (8.3 points allowed per game), was ranked No. 4 in the final AP and UPI polls, and defeated Oregon State, 34–7, in the 1965 Rose Bowl. Quarterback Bob Timberlake received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player.The 1964 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, finished in second place with a 7–2 record and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP and UPI polls. Four Ohio State defensive players (Jim Davidson, Ed Orazen, Ike Kelley and Arnie Chonko) received first-team All-American honors.

The Big Ten's individual statistical leaders included Iowa's Gary Snook with 2,062 passing yards, Illinois' Jim Grabowski with 1,004 rushing yards, and Iowa's Karl Noonan with 933 receiving yards. Illinois' center/linebacker Dick Butkus was the Big Ten's only consensus first-team All-American, finished third in voting for the 1964 Heisman Trophy, and was the first Big Ten player selected in the 1965 NFL Draft with the third overall pick.

1964 Rose Bowl

The 1964 Rose Bowl was the 50th Rose Bowl Game, played on January 1, 1964. It featured the Illinois Fighting Illini and the Washington Huskies.Illinois was led by Dick Butkus, Jim Grabowski, Lynn Stewart, and Archie Sutton on their way to a 17–7 victory over the Huskies, led by Junior Coffey.The game was scoreless until the second quarter; Washington scored first, following an Illinois fumble at its own 27-yard line. Backup quarterback, Bill Siler, kept it for three yards, then passed it to Joe Mancuso for 18 yards to the Illini 6. Siler then faked a pass and pitched to halfback Dave Kopay, who scored behind the block of halfback Ron Medved, with 8:26 left in the first half. The Illini got on the scoreboard with Jim Plankenhorn's field goal in the waning seconds of the second quarter and Washington led 7–3 at halftime.

In the third quarter, Illinois took control as Jim Warren scored the "go-ahead" touchdown on a two-yard run. Sophomore Grabowski rushed for 125 yards, scored a touchdown in the fourth quarter, and was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Butkus played both ways in this contest, both at center and linebacker. He recovered a fumble, and had an interception (in addition to leading a defense that held Washington to only 59 yards rushing and 71 yards passing for the game).

1965 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1965 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1965 Big Ten Conference football season. Players receiving All-Big Ten honors in 1965 included six players who were also recognized as consensus All-Americans: Aaron Brown, Jim Grabowski, Bob Griese, Bubba Smith, George Webster, and Bill Yearby. Eleven players from the 1965 Michigan State Spartans football team received first- or second-team All-Big Ten honors.

1965 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1965 Big Ten Conference football season was the 70th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1965 NCAA University Division football season.

1965 College Football All-America Team

The 1965 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1965.

The NCAA recognizes six selectors as "official" for the 1965 season. They are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Central Press Association (CP), (4) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and (6) the United Press International (UPI). Four of the six teams (AP, UPI, NEA, and FWAA) were selected by polling of sports writers and/or broadcasters. The CP team was selected with input from the captains of the major college teams. The AFCA team was based on a poll of more than 500 coaches. Other notable selectors, though not recognized by the NCAA as official, included The Football News (FN), a weekly national football newspaper, Time magazine, The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).Three players were unanimously selected as first-team players by all six official selectors as well as the four unofficial selectors. They are: (1) USC running back Mike Garrett who led the NCAA with 1,440 rushing yards and won the 1965 Heisman Trophy; (2) Tulsa end Howard Twilley who in 1965 set an NCAA record with 1,779 receiving yards, a single-season record that stood for 30 years; and (3) Illinois fullback Jim Grabowski who was second in the NCAA with 1,258 rushing yards and won the 1965 Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy after breaking the Big Ten Conference career rushing record. Garrett, Twilley, and Grabowski also finished first, second, and third in the 1965 Heisman Trophy voting with 926, 528, and 481 points, respectively. All three were later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

The 1965 Michigan State Spartans football team were ranked #1 in the final UPI Coaches Poll and led the country with eight players receiving at least one first-team All-American designation. The Spartans' first-team honorees were: defensive back George Webster (AFCA, AP, NEA, UPI, FN, WC); defensive end Bubba Smith (AFCA, UPI, WC); end Gene Washington (CP, FN); quarterback Steve Juday (AP); running backs Clinton Jones (FWAA) and Bob Apisa (FN); middle guard Harold Lucas (NEA); and linebacker Ron Goovert (FWAA).

Purdue, ranked No. 13 in the final UPI Coaches' Poll, finished second with four first-team honorees: quarterback Bob Griese (AFCA, CP, NEA, UPI, FN, WC); defensive tackle Jerry Shay (AFCA, FN); offensive tackle Karl Singer (AP); and offensive end Bob Hadrick (FN). Notre Dame, Arkansas, and Nebraska tied for third place, each with three first-team selections.

1965 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1965 Illinois Fighting Illini football team represented the University of Illinois in the 1965 Big Ten Conference football season. In their sixth season under head coach Pete Elliott, the Illini compiled a 6–4 (4–3 against Big Ten Conference opponents), outscored opponents 235 to 118, and finished fifth in the Big Ten. Fullback Jim Grabowski was selected as the team's most valuable player, received the team's most valuable player award, and was a consensus pick for the 1965 College Football All-America Team.

1966 Green Bay Packers season

The 1966 Green Bay Packers season was their 48th season overall and their 46th in the National Football League. The defending NFL champions had a league-best regular season record of 12–2, led by eighth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and quarterback Bart Starr, in his eleventh NFL season.

The Packers beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL championship game, the Packers' second consecutive NFL title, fourth under Lombardi, and tenth for the franchise. Two weeks later, the Packers recorded a 35–10 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in the inaugural AFL-NFL Championship Game, retroactively known as Super Bowl I.

Quarterback Starr was named the league's most valuable player (MVP) in 1966. Said Cold Hard Football Facts about Starr's 1966 season, "Starr, always underappreciated, was at his classic assassin-like best in 1966, his lone MVP season. He led the league in completion percentage, yards per attempt and passer rating, while his 4.7-to-1 [touchdown-to-interception] ratio remains one of the very best in history. Starr, as always, cranked out great performances when he absolutely had to: the 1966 Packers, for example, were the worst rushing team in football, with a meager average of 3.5 [yards-per-attempt] on the ground, despite the reputation Lombardi's Packers still carry with them today as a dominant running team." Cold Hard Football Facts also notes that 1966 Packers had the best passer rating differential (offensive passer rating minus opponents passer rating), +56.0, in the Super Bowl Era.

In 2007, the 1966 Packers were ranked as the 6th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions.

1967 Green Bay Packers season

The 1967 Green Bay Packers season was their 49th season overall and their 47th season in the National Football League and resulted in a 9–4–1 record and a victory in Super Bowl II. The team beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Championship Game, a game commonly known as the "Ice Bowl," which marked the second time the Packers had won an NFL-record third consecutive NFL championship, having also done so in 1931 under team founder Curly Lambeau. In the playoff era (since 1933), it remains the only time a team has won three consecutive NFL titles.

The Packers were led by ninth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and veteran quarterback Bart Starr, in his twelfth season. Green Bay's victory in Super Bowl II over the Oakland Raiders was the fifth world championship for the Packers under Lombardi and the last game he coached for the Packers.

Archie Sutton

Archie Michael Sutton (November 2, 1941 – August 29, 2015) was a professional American football player who played offensive tackle for three seasons for the Minnesota Vikings.Sutton found early fame as a tackle playing for the Illini alongside center, Dick Butkus; offensive guard, L.D. Stewart; and running back, Jim Grabowski. This powerhouse team defeated UCLA, Michigan, and (No. 4) Michigan State during the regular season. The Fighting Illini squad then topped Washington 17–7 in the 1964 Rose Bowl. He died in 2015.

ArenaBowl IV

Arena Bowl '90 (or Arena Bowl IV) was the Arena Football League's fourth Arena Bowl. The game featured the #2 Dallas Texans against the #1 Detroit Drive. Both teams finished their seasons at 6-2, yet the Drive led in points for (326-299) and points against (215-308).

Illinois Fighting Illini football statistical leaders

The Illinois Fighting Illini football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Illinois Fighting Illini football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Fighting Illini represent the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign in the NCAA's Big Ten Conference.

Although Illinois began competing in intercollegiate football in 1890, the school's official record book generally does not include statistics from before the 1950s, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent. An exception to this is Red Grange, who appears several times on these lists despite playing in the 1920s.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1950s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Fighting Illini have played in 4 bowl games since then, all since 2008, giving recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Illinois Fighting Illini in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Illinois Fighting Illini football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Miami Dolphins first-round draft picks

The Miami Dolphins, a professional American football team based in Miami, Florida, are part of the Eastern Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The Dolphins were founded by Joseph Robbie and Danny Thomas in 1965. They began playing in the American Football League (AFL) as an expansion team in 1966 and joined the NFL as part of the AFL–NFL merger in 1967.They first participated in the 1966 AFL Annual Player Selection Meeting, more commonly known as the NFL Draft. In the annual NFL Draft, each franchise seeks to add new players to its roster. Teams are ranked in reverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.As an expansion team in the AFL, the Dolphins were granted the first two picks in the 1966 American Football League Draft. They selected Jim Grabowski and Rick Norton with the first and second picks, respectively. The Dolphins' first selection as an NFL team was Bob Griese, a quarterback from Purdue. The team's most recent first-round selection was Minkah Fitzpatrick, a safety from Alabama in 2018.

Nad Navillus

Nad Navillus is the work of Chicago artist Dan Sullivan.

Collaborators have included Rob Sullivan (bass), Andy Sullivan (vocals), Suzanne Roberts (violin, viola), Rob Bochnik (guitar), Dylan Posa (guitar), Dudley Colley (guitar), Joss Moorkens (drums, accordion, musical saw), Bill Murphy (drums), Jim Grabowski (keyboards), Dan Sylvester (drums, percussion), Justus Roe (programmed drums), and Keith Hanlon (drums).

The first release, Nad Navillus is a self-titled instrumental CD released on the ProShop label in 1999. Recorded by Joe Kaplan.

Show Your Face is the second full-length CD from Nad Navillus, released on Jagjaguwar, November 2001. Recorded by Joe Kaplan at FullPull Studio, Chicago.

Iron Night is the third full-length, again released on Jagjaguwar, November 2002. Recorded by Rob Bochnik and Greg Norman at Electrical Audio Recording, Chicago.

As Nad Navillus, Sullivan has done solo tours in Ireland, recorded for Holland’s national radio, VPRO, and done extensive touring in the U.S. and Canada. Sullivan’s other projects have included arranging Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring for two guitars, bass and drums (as a member of The Butchershop Quartet) as well as his involvement with the band Songs: Ohia.

William Howard Taft High School (Chicago)

Taft High School is a public 4–year high school located in the Norwood Park neighborhood on the northwest side of Chicago, Illinois, United States. Taft serves communities on the far northwest side, specifically Norwood Park, Edison Park, Jefferson Park, Forest Glen and O'Hare. Taft is operated by the Chicago Public Schools district. The school is perhaps most famous as the high school attended by Jim Jacobs, the writer of Grease. Jacobs used Taft as an inspiration in writing the musical. Taft's NJROTC unit has won a Distinguished Unit award every year since 2001. Since 2014, Taft High School has been considered a "wall-to-wall" IB school as part of the International Baccalaureate foundation. Taft high school has offered the International Baccalaureate program since 2001.

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