Jim Fassel

James Edward Fassel (born August 31, 1949) is a former American football coach. He was the head coach of the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL) from 1997 to 2003. He has served as offensive coordinator of other NFL teams, and as head coach, general manager, and president of the Las Vegas Locomotives of the United Football League.

Jim Fassel
refer to caption
Fassel at Nellis Air Force Base in 2011
Personal information
Born:August 31, 1949 (age 69)
Anaheim, California
Career information
High school:Anaheim (CA)
College:Fullerton College
USC
Long Beach State
NFL Draft:1972 / Round: 7 / Pick: 167
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Win–Loss Record:58–53–1
Postseason Record:2–3
Overall:60–56–1

Biography

Fassel graduated from Anaheim High School and played quarterback at Fullerton College, USC, and Long Beach State.[1] He was drafted in the 7th round by the Chicago Bears in the 1972 NFL Draft.

Fassel played briefly with The Hawaiians of the WFL in 1974, and became an assistant coach during the 1974 WFL season. He left the WFL after the '74 season, but briefly returned when the Hawaiians needed a quarterback late in the 1975 season. He played in the final game of the WFL for the Hawaiians, throwing the last pass in the league's history as the WFL folded three days later on October 22, 1975.

Coaching career

Fassel's first professional coaching job was with The Hawaiians of the World Football League in 1974, where he played quarterback before moving to the sidelines as an offensive assistant coach.[2][3] He then began his college coaching career with stints at the University of Utah, Weber State and Stanford University, where he worked with John Elway. After five months as the offensive coordinator and quarterback coach for the New Orleans Breakers of the USFL,[4][5] he was named head coach at Utah on November 30, 1984.[6]

Before becoming New York Giants head coach, Fassel served as an assistant coach with the Arizona Cardinals, Denver Broncos, New York Giants, and Oakland Raiders.

New York Giants

Fassel originally coached with Giants as an assistant in 1991 and 1992. Three weeks after the Giants won Super Bowl XXV, he was hired by Bill Parcells as their quarterback coach.[7] In 1992, he was promoted to offensive coordinator.[8]

During Fassel's tenure as head coach of the Giants, his teams were known for numerous post-season runs in December and for winning big games, such as a victory against the previously undefeated Denver Broncos in 1998. In 1997, he was named NFL coach of the year. He resurrected the career of quarterback Kerry Collins and received acclaim for his "playoff guarantee" in the 2000 season, during which he led the Giants to an improbable Super Bowl appearance.

His legacy as head coach for the Giants is mixed. Fassel's Giants were known for their disappointments against inferior teams in the regular season, as well as in the playoffs. The most notable loss was a 39–38 loss to the San Francisco 49ers in the 2002 postseason, in which they lost a 38–14 third quarter lead. During the 2003 season, injuries decimated the Giants and he was fired amidst some controversy.

While coaching for the Giants, Fassel lived in Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey.[9]

Baltimore Ravens

Fassel joined the Ravens as an Offensive Consultant in 2004 to help with development of Kyle Boller. He became the Ravens offensive coordinator in 2005. Critics of Fassel have pointed to his lack of success as offensive coordinator after two seasons with the Ravens, in 2005 and part of 2006. During that time, the Ravens ranked near the bottom of the league in offense.

On October 17, 2006, Fassel was fired as offensive coordinator for the Ravens.[10]

Las Vegas Locomotives

In January 2009, Fassel was named coach of the Las Vegas entrant into the United Football League. The Locos finished the regular season 4–2 and defeated the 6–0 Florida Tuskers in the first UFL Championship Game.[11]

Fassel returned to the Locos in 2010 and helped lead the team to repeat as champions, again defeating the Tuskers in the 2010 UFL Championship Game. The Locos tried to three-peat in 2011, but this time fell to the Tuskers (who had since been relocated and renamed the Virginia Destroyers) in the 2011 UFL Championship Game.[12] Fassel was the only current UFL head coach who was active in the league since its inauguration and was the Locos' head coach when the league suspended play in 2012.

Broadcasting career

Fassel entered broadcasting following his firing as offensive coordinator for the Ravens, joining Westwood One radio as a color commentator for its Sunday NFL action. He stayed with the network for two seasons, calling Sunday afternoon games with Harry Kalas in 2007 and Sunday Night Football with Dave Sims. Fassel was also part of Westwood One's playoff coverage those two years, calling various games, and worked the 2007 and 2008 NFC Championship Games with Bill Rosinski (2007) and Marv Albert (2008).

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Utah Utes (Western Athletic Conference) (1985–1989)
1985 Utah 8–4 5–3 3rd
1986 Utah 2–9 1–7 9th
1987 Utah 5–7 2–6 7th
1988 Utah 6–5 4–4 5th
1989 Utah 4–8 2–6 7th
Utah: 25–33 14–26
Total: 25–33

Professional

Team Year Regular Season Post Season
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
NYG 1997 10 5 1 .656 1st in NFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to Minnesota Vikings in Wild Card Round.
NYG 1998 8 8 0 .500 3rd in NFC East
NYG 1999 7 9 0 .438 3rd in NFC East
NYG 2000 12 4 0 .750 1st in NFC East 2 1 .667 Lost to Baltimore Ravens in Super Bowl XXXV.
NYG 2001 7 9 0 .438 3rd in NFC East
NYG 2002 10 6 0 .625 2nd in NFC East 0 1 .000 Lost to San Francisco 49ers in Wild Card Round.
NYG 2003 4 12 0 .250 4th in NFC East
NYG Total 58 53 1 .522 2 3 .400
LVL 2009 4 2 0 .667 2nd in UFL 1 0 1.000 2009 UFL Champions
LVL 2010 5 3 0 .625 1st in UFL 1 0 1.000 2010 UFL Champions
LVL 2011 3 1 0 .750 2nd in UFL 0 1 .000 Lost to Virginia Destroyers in Championship Game
LVL 2012 4 0 0 1.000 1st in UFL 0 0 -- None, cessation of league play
LVL Total 16 6 0 .727 2 1 .667 2 William Hambrecht Championships
Total 73 59 1 .552 4 4 .500 -

Coaching tree

Assistants under Jim Fassel who became NCAA or NFL head coaches:

Personal life

Fassel and his wife Kitty divorced in 2006 after years of counseling,[13] but later reconciled and have remarried.[14] They are the parents of John Fassel, currently the special teams coordinator for the Los Angeles Rams. They had four other children. One was placed for adoption before they were married; they were reunited with him in 2003.[15]

Fassel is good friends with fellow coach Mike Holmgren, dating to their days as USC quarterbacks.[16]

See also

References

  1. ^ Simers, T.J. (October 25, 2010). "Odds are Jim Fassel is never coaching in the NFL again". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  2. ^ "1974 WFL Team Pages: The Hawaiians". CharlotteHornetsWFL.com. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  3. ^ "WFL Players: Jim Fassel". NASLJerseys.com. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  4. ^ "Jim Fassel named offensive coordinator for New Orleans Breakers". upi.com. UPI. July 10, 1984. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  5. ^ Garber, Greg (March 5, 2003). "The cradle of NFL coaching?". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  6. ^ Harvey, Tom (November 30, 1984). "Jim Fassel named University of Utah's head football coach". upi.com. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  7. ^ Litsky, Frank (February 21, 1991). "Parcells Promotes 3 Aides and Hires 2 Others". The New York Times. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  8. ^ "Giants Promote Jim Fassel to Offensive Coordinator". Deseret News. January 16, 1992. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  9. ^ Anderson, Dave (March 2, 2001). "Sports of The Times: Fassel's Finished Basement". The New York Times. Retrieved November 2, 2007. Maybe that explains how the Fassels celebrated when he returned to their Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J., home on Tuesday with a four-year, $10.75 million contract — a guarantee that they will be living at the same address for at least eight years, their longest consecutive residence.
  10. ^ "Ravens fire offensive coordinator Jim Fassel". USA Today. Associated Press. October 17, 2006. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  11. ^ https://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=aYkJkibYDEfY&refer=us
  12. ^ White, Paul (October 22, 2011). "Destroyers capture UFL title as hometown star Rouse shines after cousin's slaying". Daily Press. Newport News, Virginia. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  13. ^ Borden, Sam (December 15, 2011). "Years Later, Still Waiting for a Second Chance". The New York Times. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  14. ^ http://www.giants.com/news-and-blogs/article-1/Exploring-the-legacy-of-former-coach-Jim-Fassel/a71346ea-7986-4688-b569-542a24f7d565
  15. ^ Pennington, Bill (May 16, 2003). "PRO FOOTBALL: 34 Years Later, One Coach's Sweetest Victory". The New York Times. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
  16. ^ Pennington, Bill (December 22, 2001). "PRO FOOTBALL – GIANTS NOTEBOOK: Fassel and Holmgren Remember the Good Ol' Days". The New York Times. Retrieved January 20, 2019.
1985 Utah Utes football team

The 1985 Utah Utes football team represented the University of Utah in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their first season under head coach Jim Fassel, the Utes compiled an 8–4 record (5–3 against WAC opponents), finished in third place in the WAC, and outscored their opponents, 405 to 343. The team played its home games in Rice Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The team's statistical leaders included Larry Egger with 2,988 passing yards, Eddie Johnson with 1,018 rushing yards, and Loren Richey with 971 receiving yards.

1986 Utah Utes football team

The 1986 Utah Utes football team represented the University of Utah in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their second season under head coach Jim Fassel, the Utes compiled a 2–9 record (1–7 against WAC opponents), finished in last place in the WAC, and were outscored by their opponents, 444 to 278. The team played its home games in Rice Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The team's statistical leaders included Larry Egger with 2,761 passing yards, Eddie Johnson with 1,046 rushing yards, and Loren Richey with 775 receiving yards.

1987 Utah Utes football team

The 1987 Utah Utes football team represented the University of Utah in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their third season under head coach Jim Fassel, the Utes compiled a 6–5 record (4–5 against WAC opponents), finished in seventh place in the WAC, and were outscored by their opponents, 362 to 321. The team played its home games in Rice Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The team's statistical leaders included Chris Mendonca with 2,389 passing yards, Martel Black with 520 rushing yards, and Carl Harry with 826 receiving yards.

1988 Utah Utes football team

The 1988 Utah Utes football team represented the University of Utah in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth season under head coach Jim Fassel, the Utes compiled a 6–5 record (4–5 against WAC opponents), finished in fifth place in the WAC, and were outscored by their opponents, 399 to 357. The team played its home games in Rice Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The team's statistical leaders included Scott Mitchell with 4,322 passing yards, Eddie Johnson with 748 rushing yards, and Carl Harry with 1,145 receiving yards.

1989 Utah Utes football team

The 1989 Utah Utes football team represented the University of Utah in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fifth and final season under head coach Jim Fassel, the Utes compiled a 4–8 record (2–6 against WAC opponents), finished in seventh place in the WAC, and were outscored by their opponents, 524 to 365. The team played its home games in Rice Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The team's statistical leaders included Scott Mitchell with 3,211 passing yards, Clifton Smith with 681 rushing yards, and Dennis Smith with 1,091 receiving yards.

1996 New York Giants season

The 1996 New York Giants season was the franchise's 72nd season in the National Football League (NFL). With a 6–10 record, the Giants finished in last place in the National Football Conference East Division.In the 1996 NFL Draft, the Giants selected defensive end Cedric Jones with the fifth overall pick. The Giants' first game of the season was at home against the Buffalo Bills, and resulted in a 23–20 loss in overtime. After being shut out by the Dallas Cowboys, New York fell to 0–3 with a 31–10 defeat to the Washington Redskins. Against the New York Jets, the Giants earned their first victory of the season; a 15–10 win over the Minnesota Vikings left them with a 2–3 record heading into their bye week. The team then lost four of its next six games. After defeating the Cowboys, the Giants' record entering December stood at 5–7. They ended the season by losing three of their last four games. The Giants fired head coach Dan Reeves after the season, and hired Jim Fassel as his replacement.Quarterback Dave Brown started all 16 games for the Giants in 1996, throwing for 12 touchdowns and 20 interceptions. New York's leading running back was Rodney Hampton, who had 254 carries for 827 yards. Wide receivers Chris Calloway and Thomas Lewis led the Giants with four touchdowns and 53 receptions each; Calloway had a team-high 739 receiving yards. Defensively, Chad Bratzke and Michael Strahan had the most sacks among Giants players with five apiece, while Jason Sehorn had five interceptions to lead the team.

1997 NFL season

The 1997 NFL season was the 78th regular season of the National Football League. The Oilers relocated from Houston, Texas to Nashville, Tennessee. The newly renamed Tennessee Oilers played their home games during this season at the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis, Tennessee while construction of a new stadium in Nashville started. Houston would rejoin the NFL with the expansion Texans in 2002.

This was the last season to date that TNT broadcast NFL games, as well as the last for NBC until 2006. When the TV contracts were renewed near the end of the season, Fox retained the National Football Conference package, CBS took over the American Football Conference package and ESPN won the right to televise all of the Sunday night games.

Due to Game 7 of the 1997 World Series, the Chicago Bears–Miami Dolphins game at Pro Player Stadium was delayed one day to Monday, October 27.

The Denver Broncos and Tampa Bay Buccaneers both changed their uniforms, and the new uniforms for both teams were introduced during this season.

The season ended with Super Bowl XXXII when the Denver Broncos defeated the Green Bay Packers 31–24 at Qualcomm Stadium. This broke the National Football Conference's streak of thirteen consecutive Super Bowl victories, the last American Football Conference win having been the Los Angeles Raiders defeating the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XVIII.

1997 New York Giants season

The 1997 New York Giants season was the franchise's 73rd season in the National Football League and the first under head coach Jim Fassel. The team improved upon their previous season's output of 6–10, winning ten games including a tie against the Washington Redskins, it was the first tie for the Giants since 1983. and qualifying for the playoffs for the first time in four seasons. In the playoffs, the Giants lost to the Minnesota Vikings in the Wild Card Game 23-22.

1999 New York Giants season

The 1999 New York Giants season was the franchise's 75th season in the National Football League and the third under head coach Jim Fassel. The team failed to improve upon their previous season's output of 8–8, winning only seven games and missing the playoffs for the second straight season.

2002 New York Giants season

The 2002 New York Giants season was the franchise's 78th season in the National Football League and the sixth under head coach Jim Fassel. The team improved upon their previous season's 7–9 disappointment, winning ten games and returning to the playoffs for the second time in three years, ending the season on a four-game winning streak. After a midseason slump, head coach Jim Fassel stripped offensive coordinator Sean Payton of playcalling duties, and the Giants went on to a winning streak that would carry them to the playoffs. Leading 35–14 in the third quarter of the NFC wild-card came at San Francisco, Jeremy Shockey dropped a touchdown pass forcing a field goal to make the score 38–14. Fassel decided to rest starting running back Tiki Barber to save him for the next round, but the 49ers gained momentum, and the Giants did not score again, losing the game 39–38. Following the season, Payton was not retained; he won the Super Bowl seven years later as the head coach of the New Orleans Saints.

2003 New York Giants season

The 2003 New York Giants season was the franchise's 79th season in the National Football League and the seventh and final under head coach Jim Fassel. The team failed to duplicate their 2002 season's playoff appearance, instead only winning four games and finishing the season on an eight-game losing streak. Jim Fassel was fired after the 2003 season and was replaced by Tom Coughlin in 2004.

Dave Brazil (American football)

Dave Brazil (25 March 1936 – 10 March 2017) was an American football coach who last served with the New York Giants under head coach Jim Fassel. He was the last defensive coordinator for Chuck Noll with the Pittsburgh Steelers from 1990-91.

1968 University of Holy Cross (DC&OC)

1969-1970 (University of Tulsa) (DB)(LB)

1972-1974 (Eastern Michigan University (DC&OC)

1975 (Detroit Wheels - WFL (DC)

1976 (Chicago Wind - WFL (LB&DL)

1980 (Boston College) (DC)

1981-1982 (Kent State University) DC

1984-1985 Kansas City Chiefs (DB)

1986-1988 Kansas City Chiefs (LB)

1989 Pittsburgh Steelers (LB)

1990-1991 Pittsburgh Steelers (DC)

1992-2003 New York Giants (LB)DQC)

History of the New York Giants (1994–present)

The New York Giants, an American football team which currently plays in the NFL's National Football Conference, have qualified for the postseason seven times since 1994. With the retirement of Phil Simms and Lawrence Taylor — two of the most important figures in franchise history – after the 1993 season, the Giants entered a new era.

After a successful 1993 season, the Giants struggled under head coach Dan Reeves, and failed to reach the playoffs for three consecutive seasons. With the hiring of Jim Fassel as the team's new head coach in 1997, the Giants fortunes improved and they made the playoffs several times. Led by free agent acquisition quarterback Kerry Collins, the Fassel era included an appearance in Super Bowl XXXV, where they lost to the Baltimore Ravens. Although there was success, the Fassel era was also marked by inconsistency, and he was fired after the 2003 season.

Fassel was replaced by Tom Coughlin who served as head coach from 2004 to 2015. The Giants acquired their current starting quarterback Eli Manning via a draft day trade from the San Diego Chargers. Manning had been the quarterback at University of Mississippi, and was the first pick in the 2004 NFL Draft. During this period standout Giants players include defensive end Michael Strahan, who set the NFL single season record in sacks in 2001, and running back Tiki Barber, who set a team record in rushing yards in 2005. The Giants made the playoffs four consecutive seasons, from 2005–2008 (including a Super Bowl victory during the 2007 season), but missed the playoffs in 2009 and 2010.

Las Vegas Locomotives

The Las Vegas Locomotives (called the Locos for short) were a professional American football team based in Las Vegas, Nevada that played in the United Football League. The team played their home games at Sam Boyd Stadium, home field for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Jim Fassel was the franchise's head coach, president, and general manager. The Locomotives appeared in all three UFL Championship Games, winning both the 2009 and 2010 iterations; the Locos were also the last of the four charter UFL franchises to remain in their original home city, to retain their original head coach, and to have played all of their home games at the same venue.

List of New York Giants head coaches

The New York Giants are a professional American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. They are members of the East Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The franchise was founded in 1925 and have played for 19 NFL championships. They have won seven World Championship Games (Super Bowl and NFL Championship games) and one NFL Championship by virtue of having the league's best record at the end of the season in 1927.There have been 17 head coaches for the Giants franchise. Five different coaches have won NFL Championships with the team: Earl Potteiger in 1927, Steve Owen in 1934 and 1938, Jim Lee Howell in 1956, Bill Parcells in 1986 and 1990, and Tom Coughlin in 2007 and 2011. Steve Owen leads all-time in games coached and wins, and LeRoy Andrews leads all coaches in winning percentage with .828 (with at least one full season coached). Bill Arnsparger is statistically the worst coach the Giants have had in terms of winning percentage, with .200.Of the 17 Giants coaches, three have been elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Benny Friedman, Steve Owen and Bill Parcells. Several former players have been head coach for the Giants, including Doc Alexander, Earl Potteiger, Benny Friedman, Steve Owen, Jim Lee Howell, and Alex Webster.

List of New York Giants seasons

The New York Giants are an American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. They are a member of the National Football League (NFL) and play in the NFL's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. In 94 completed seasons, the franchise has won eight NFL championships, including four Super Bowl victories. The Giants have won more than 600 games and appeared in the NFL playoffs 32 times. Though the Giants play home games in East Rutherford, they draw fans from throughout the New York metropolitan area. In 2010, the team began playing in MetLife Stadium, formerly New Meadowlands Stadium.After Tim Mara paid $500 for the franchise, the Giants joined the NFL in the 1925 season and won their first championship two years later. In 1934, the team won its second title, defeating the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game. The Giants won another championship four years later, and made four appearances in the NFL Championship Game from 1939 to 1946, losing each time. New York won its fourth NFL title in 1956, with a 47–7 win over the Bears in the championship game. From 1958 to 1963, the Giants reached the NFL Championship Game five times, but were defeated on each occasion. Following the 1963 season, the franchise did not return to the playoffs until 1981, only finishing .500 or better five times during the postseason drought.

Thirty years after the team's previous NFL title, the Giants were victorious in Super Bowl XXI, winning against the Denver Broncos 39–20 to end the 1986 season. The Giants won their second Super Bowl four years later, defeating the Buffalo Bills 20–19 in Super Bowl XXV. In the 2000 season, New York returned to the Super Bowl, but lost to the Baltimore Ravens 34–7. The 2007 season saw the Giants win their seventh NFL championship at Super Bowl XLII, where they defeated the previously unbeaten New England Patriots 17–14 in a game that is widely considered to be one of the biggest upsets in Super Bowl history. The Giants made four consecutive appearances in the playoffs from 2005 to 2008, before an 8–8 record in 2009 caused them to miss the postseason. After missing the playoffs in 2010, they defeated the Atlanta Falcons, Green Bay Packers, and San Francisco 49ers in the 2011 playoffs to reach Super Bowl XLVI, where they defeated the Patriots 21–17. In the most recent season, 2018, the Giants went 5–11 and did not qualify for the postseason.

List of Utah Utes football seasons

The Utah Utes football program is a college football team that represents the University of Utah. The Utes have completed 124 seasons and played in 21 certified bowl games. In 1910, Utah joined the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference (RMAC), the program's first conference affiliation. The Utes won eight conference championships, including six consecutive titles from 1928 to 1933. In 1938 the Utah, along with six other RMAC schools left the conference to form the Mountain States Conference, more commonly known as the Big Seven. After the Colorado Buffaloes withdrew from the Big Seven, the conference was known as the Skyline Conference. The Utes won ten conference championships while in the conference. In 1962, Utah became a charter member of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC). When the charter members of the WAC left at the end of the 1998 season, Utah became a charter member of the Mountain West Conference (MWC) winning four conference titles. In 2010, the Utes withdrew from the MWC and along with former conference rival Colorado, became the 11th and 12th members of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12) in the newly formed South Division.

The Hawaiians (WFL)

The Hawaiians were a professional American football team based in Honolulu that played in the World Football League. They played two seasons, 1974 and 1975. Their records were 9-11 in 1974 and 4-7-1 in 1975. Their home stadium was Honolulu Stadium in 1974 and Aloha Stadium in 1975. The best known player to play for the Hawaiians was former Dallas Cowboys running back Calvin Hill, though quarterback Jim Fassel became better known as a head coach decades later. The Hawaiians head coach was Michael Giddings who guided the Hawaiians through both the 1974 and 1975 World Football League seasons.

The franchise was originally going to be called the Honolulu Warriors, but a local team had trademarked that name. As a result, the team was known simply as "The Hawaiians", although the press frequently mistakenly called them the "Honolulu Hawaiians" or the "Hawaii Hawaiians." They were owned by real estate developer Christopher Hemmeter for the first season. He was named league president in 1975, and sold the Hawaiians to jewel merchant Edward Sultan, Jr.

To keep the NFL out of Hawaii, the WFL had the Hawaiians play their games on Sundays, while the rest of the league played (mostly) on Wednesday nights. This resulted in confusion, since one team played a different schedule from the rest of the league, and teams had to fly back to the mainland Sunday night to play again on Wednesday night. The franchise also made the mistake of allowing a same-day tape delay of their home games, meaning many Hawaiians' fans would watch the game on TV later on that day. (As a result, the Hawaiians drew just 13,031 fans per game, ahead of only New York and Detroit, neither of which finished the season.) Eventually, the Hawaiians switched to playing on Wednesday nights.

Even with these missteps, the Hawaiians represented a serious attempt to form a viable professional football organization, one that at least had the potential for success had the WFL been better run. They were one of only three teams that did not miss a payroll during the league's first season. (False accounts had said some players released from the team could not afford to get to the mainland.) Hemmeter and his original partner, Sam Battisone (who also owned the NBA's New Orleans Jazz) were among the few owners thought to be capable of fielding a team in 1975.It was the first and, to date, only major professional American football team to establish its home base outside the contiguous 48 states. (This excludes the Pro Bowl teams, which have called Hawaii home from 1980 to 2009 and again in 2011, 2012 and 2016.)

Utah Utes football

The Utah Utes football program is a college football team that competes in the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12) of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of NCAA Division I and represents the University of Utah. The Utah college football program began in 1892 and has played home games at the current site of Rice-Eccles Stadium since 1927. They have won twenty-four conference championships in five conferences during their history, and, as of the end of the 2017 season, they have a cumulative record of 668 wins, 459 losses, and 31 ties.The Utes have a record of 17–5 (.770) in bowl games. Among Utah's bowl appearances are two games from the Bowl Championship Series (BCS): the Fiesta Bowl and the Sugar Bowl. In the 2005 Fiesta Bowl, Utah defeated the Pittsburgh Panthers 35–7, and in the 2009 Sugar Bowl, they defeated the Alabama Crimson Tide 31–17. During those seasons, Utah was a member of the Mountain West Conference, whose champion does not receive an automatic invitation to a BCS bowl. The Utes were the first team from a conference without an automatic bid to play in a BCS bowl game—colloquially known as being a BCS Buster—and the first BCS Buster to play in a second BCS Bowl.

The Franchise
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Key Personnel
UFL Championships (2)
UFL Championship
Appearances (3)
Seasons (4)
League Affiliation
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