Jim Edmonds

James Patrick Edmonds (born June 27, 1970) is an American former center fielder in Major League Baseball and a broadcaster for Fox Sports Midwest. He played for the California/Anaheim Angels, St. Louis Cardinals, San Diego Padres, Chicago Cubs, Milwaukee Brewers, and Cincinnati Reds from 1993 to 2010.

Known for his defensive abilities – particularly his catches – Edmonds also was a prolific hitter, batting .284 with 393 home runs and an on-base plus slugging percentage (OPS) of .903. He is affectionately known by Cardinal fans as "Jimmy Baseball"[1] and "Jimmy Ballgame".[2]

Jim Edmonds
DSC01285 Jim Edmonds
Edmonds batting for the Cardinals in 2007
Center fielder
Born: June 27, 1970 (age 49)
Fullerton, California
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 9, 1993, for the California Angels
Last MLB appearance
September 21, 2010, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.284
Home runs393
Runs batted in1,199
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Edmonds was born on June 27, 1970 in Fullerton, California. His parents divorced when he was a child and had joint custody. His father's home was within a few hundred feet of Anaheim Stadium.[3] He attended Diamond Bar High School in Diamond Bar, in eastern Los Angeles County.

Professional career

Edmonds was selected in the seventh round of the 1988 draft by the California Angels. He had injured his shoulder in his senior year of high school, causing him to fall in the draft.[4]

Following the draft, he was assigned to the Bend Bucks (in Bend, Oregon), the Angels' A-Short Season affiliate in the Northwest League. In 1988, he played in 35 games for the Bucks and hit .221. The following year, he was promoted to the Quad Cities Angels, the team's Class-A affiliate in the Midwest League. He played in 31 games and hit .261.

In 1990, Edmonds advanced to the Palm Springs Angels, a "High-A" team in the California League. He played 91 games and hit .293. He remained with Palm Springs for the 1991 season as well. In 1992, he was promoted to Double-A with the Midland Angels in the Texas League. He hit .313 in 70 games for Midland. He was promoted again in 1992, moving up to Triple-A Edmonton Trappers for 50 games. The Angels changed Triple-A teams in 1993, so Edmonds played for Vancouver Canadians.

Edmonds was traded from Anaheim to St. Louis for second baseman Adam Kennedy and pitcher Kent Bottenfield shortly before the beginning of the 2000 season.

Throughout his career, Edmonds predominantly played center field. However, he played first base in stretches, usually as a result of injury to a starting first baseman, but sometimes simply to provide rest to regular position players, or to give another outfielder playing time. For instance, Edmonds made six starts at first when Albert Pujols suffered an oblique injury in June 2006. Additionally, he pitched two innings while in High-A ball in 1991.

Edmonds hit 30 or more home runs in five seasons, while maintaining a .285 career batting average, and knocked in 1,199 runs in his career. He also received eight Gold Glove Awards in his career at center field, most of them coming as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals.

Three of Edmonds's most spectacular defensive plays came while on the Cardinals and the Angels. On June 10, 1997, while playing center field for the Anaheim Angels, Edmonds ran straight back towards the center field wall of Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, and dove outstretched for a fly ball over his head, making the catch on the warning track. His other memorable catch came when on the St. Louis Cardinals on July 16, 2004, while covering center field against Reds batter Jason LaRue. LaRue hit a deep shot to center field that surely would have been enough to be a home run. On a dead run, Edmonds scaled the wall, reached his entire right arm over the fence, and caught the ball. During the 2004 NLCS against the Houston Astros, Edmonds made a diving, game-saving catch.

2004 season

The 2004 season was Edmonds' best season. He hit .301, had a .643 slugging percentage, 42 HRs, and 111 RBI; all but batting average were career highs. As a result, he earned a Silver Slugger Award, a Gold Glove Award, and was fifth in the voting for the Most Valuable Player Award.

A defining moment of Edmonds' career came in the 2004 National League Championship Series, in which Edmonds hit an extra-inning home run to win Game 6. In Game 7, Edmonds made a spectacular defensive play in center, helping the Cardinals win the pennant.

During a Chicago Cubs-Cardinals game at Wrigley Field on July 19, 2004, pitcher Carlos Zambrano was ejected from the game for throwing at Edmonds. Zambrano screamed at Edmonds as he rounded the bases on a home run, earning Zambrano a five-game suspension.[5]

Edmonds, along with Albert Pujols and Scott Rolen, earned the nickname "MV3" for their phenomenal 2004 seasons. Edmonds was on the cover of video game MLB Slugfest 2004.

After 2005

Jim Edmonds - 2008 - cropped
Edmonds batting for the Chicago Cubs in 2008.

On Mother's Day, May 14, 2006, Edmonds was one of more than 50 hitters who brandished a pink bat to benefit the Breast Cancer Foundation. In 2006, Edmonds helped the St. Louis Cardinals win their first World Series title since 1982 while contributing 4 RBI.

In his last two seasons in St. Louis (2006 and 2007), Edmonds struggled with post-concussion syndrome, which caused dizziness and blurred vision.[6][7]

On December 14, 2007, Edmonds was traded to the San Diego Padres in exchange for prospect David Freese. As part of the deal, the Cardinals also agreed to pay part of Edmonds' 2008 salary.[8] Edmonds' 241 home runs with the Cardinals are the fourth-most in franchise history.[9]

On May 9, 2008, the Padres released him after hitting only .178 with one home run in 90 at bats. On May 14, 2008, the Chicago Cubs, in need of a left-handed bat, signed Edmonds to a one-year contract of which the Cubs were only responsible for the league minimum. He started the next day against his former team, the Padres, and went 1 for 4. Edmonds was not well received initially by the fans in Chicago, but after joining the Cubs, he hit over .300 with 8 home runs in his first six weeks. On June 21, 2008, Edmonds hit two home runs in the fourth inning against the Chicago White Sox. He also had two other multi-homer games as a Cub: one on July 31, 2008 against the Milwaukee Brewers and one on August 8, 2008 against his former team, the St. Louis Cardinals.

Jim Edmonds on August 2, 2010
In 2010, Edmonds returned to the majors with the Milwaukee Brewers.

Edmonds did not play in 2009, sitting out because he did not receive what he or his agent considered a good offer.[6] In January 2010, he announced his intention to return to the majors.[10] On January 28, Edmonds signed a minor league deal with the Milwaukee Brewers. The Brewers added him to the major league roster on March 25.[11] At that time, he said, "last year was a mistake, I should have played somewhere."[6]

On August 9, 2010, Edmonds was traded to the Cincinnati Reds in exchange for Chris Dickerson. Both Edmonds and Dickerson had to clear waivers because the non-waiver trade deadline had already passed.[12]

On February 4, 2011, Edmonds signed a minor league contract with the St. Louis Cardinals;[13] however, after continuing symptoms from a strained Achilles tendon suffered during the 2010 season, Edmonds officially announced his retirement from baseball on February 18, 2011.[14]

Broadcasting career

On March 14, 2013, Fox Sports Midwest announced the hiring of Jim Edmonds as a member of their St. Louis Cardinals broadcasting crew.[15] Edmonds would serve as an analyst during Cardinals Live pre-game and post-game broadcasts. He replaced former Cardinal pitcher Cal Eldred, who had served in the same role for FSM since 2009 and moved on to become a special assistant in the Cardinals organization.[15] Edmonds has expressed a desire to one day be a part of the Cardinals ownership group.[16]

Personal life

Edmonds has two daughters with his first wife, Lee Ann Horton. She died in 2015.[17] Edmonds and second wife Allison Jayne Raski were married from 2008 to 2014; together, they share two children.

Edmonds married Meghan O'Toole King on October 24, 2014. Meghan's sister is professional soccer player Julie King. Meghan joined the cast of The Real Housewives of Orange County in 2015. Edmonds himself also appears on the show. On Thanksgiving Day 2016, they had a daughter.[18] On November 27, 2017, it was announced that the couple were expecting twins boys together due June 2018.[19] The twin boys were born on June 5, 2018.

Business ventures

After retiring from baseball, Edmonds remained in the St. Louis area for several years, where he was involved in the restaurant business.

In September 2013, Jim Edmonds 15 Steakhouse closed in St. Louis, of which he was a 50 percent owner and it was named for his jersey number.[20]

In December 2013, Edmonds and his business partner Mark Winfield reopened the Jim Edmonds 15 Steakhouse space as a restaurant called The Precinct.[21] The restaurant was dubbed "the safest bar in town" and also the "home of the hottest wings". The former claim, like the name of the restaurant itself, was a bid to become the hangout of choice of city police officers once they moved into their new headquarters just around the corner. Police-themed memorabilia shared space on the walls with framed Cardinals jerseys and flat-screen TVs.

Edmonds and Winfield continued to partner in the restaurant business with the opening of Winfield's Gathering Place in Kirkwood, Missouri as a BBQ-style restaurant. It does not promote Edmonds' celebrity brand. In fact, there are no Edmonds, Cardinals or other sports memorabilia although there are televisions in both the dining room and the bar area for watching games.[22]

In May 2015, The Precinct closed.[23] On July 2, 2016, Winfield's Gathering Place closed.[24]

Awards

EdmondsHOF
Edmonds' Cardinals Hall of Fame speech

Edmonds' fielding ability has earned him recognition from Major League coaches and managers, who voted him a Rawlings Gold Glove winner eight times in nine seasons from 1997 to 2005.

ESPN's Rob Neyer lists Edmonds as #12 of the top 100 players of the first decade of the 21st century due to his productivity at the plate and gold-glove skills in center field.[25]

On August 8, 2014, Edmonds was inducted into the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame. He was announced as a candidate for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum on November 9, 2015, but was removed from the ballot on January 6, 2016 after only receiving 2.5% of the vote in his first year of eligibility.[26]

References

  1. ^ Miklasz, Bernie. – 'Jimmy Baseball' delivers in clutch Archived August 13, 2006, at the Wayback Machine. – Saint Louis Post-Dispatch. – August 11, 2006. – Retrieved: November 12, 2006
  2. ^ Hummel, Rick. "Jimmy Ballgame arrives".
  3. ^ Friend, Tom (July 27, 1995). "A Real Angel in the Outfield; Hard-Hitting Edmonds Helps His Boyhood Favorites Contend in West". The New York Times. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  4. ^ Strauss, Joe (August 18, 2014). "Strauss: Edmonds welcomed into Hall of Fame as hometown hero". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  5. ^ Sullivan, Paul Carlos Zambrano's greatest fits Chicago Tribune, March 27, 2010 (accessed August 9, 2010)
  6. ^ a b c Rains, Rob Edmonds waits on Cardinals, will consider other team's offers Archived May 27, 2010, at the Wayback Machine St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 22, 2010 (accessed August 9, 2010)
  7. ^ Edmonds diagnosed with post-concussion syndrome ESPN.com, August 17, 2006 (accessed August 9, 2010)
  8. ^ "Padres acquiring Jim Edmonds in trade with Cardinals". SignOnSanDiego.com. December 14, 2007. Retrieved May 14, 2010.
  9. ^ Leach, Matthew (December 15, 2007). "Cards deal icon Edmonds to Padres". MLB.com. Retrieved May 14, 2010.
  10. ^ Morosi, Jon Paul (January 19, 2010). "Edmonds open to several options". FOX Sports. Retrieved January 20, 2010.
  11. ^ "Brewers add Edmonds to roster". USA Today. March 25, 2010. Retrieved May 14, 2010.
  12. ^ Sheldon, Mark Reds pick up Edmonds for playoff push mlb.com, August 9, 2010 (accessed August 9, 2010)
  13. ^ St. Louis Post Dispatch Cardinals sign Edmonds to minor-league deal Derrick Goold, February 4, 2011 (accessed February 4, 2011)
  14. ^ Hummel, Rick. Edmonds retires; foot injury doesn't respond St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Published February 18, 2011.
  15. ^ a b "Edmonds joins Fox Sports Midwest". Fox Sports Midwest.com. March 14, 2013. Retrieved March 14, 2013.
  16. ^ "Jim Edmonds, future Cardinals owner". St. Louis Post-Dispatch via website. February 17, 2013. Retrieved March 14, 2013.
  17. ^ "Real Housewives Of Orange County's LeAnn Edmonds Horton dies of cancer at 45, prompting heart-breaking reactions from daughter Hayley and from Meghan King Edmonds". Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  18. ^ "Meghan King Edmonds". Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  19. ^ Quinn, Dave (November 27, 2017). "Baby Boy on the Way for Meghan King Edmonds". People. United States: Time Inc. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  20. ^ Halverson, Matthew 15 Things Your Should Know About Jim Edmonds' New Restaurant stlmag.com, October 2007 (accessed August 9, 2010)
  21. ^ Froeb, Ian (December 12, 2013). "Jim Edmonds takes another swing at the restaurant biz at the Precinct". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved December 16, 2016.
  22. ^ Froeb, Ian (April 17, 2015). "Jim Edmonds' new restaurant, Winfield's Gathering Place, is a barbecue joint in disguise". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved December 16, 2016.
  23. ^ Fenske, Sarah (June 2, 2015). "St. Louis Restaurant Openings and Closings: May 2015". The Riverfront Times. Retrieved December 16, 2016.
  24. ^ Mahe, George (June 23, 2016). "Winfield's Gathering Place Closing July 2". St. Louis Magazine. Retrieved December 16, 2016.
  25. ^ Neyer, Rob (December 14, 2009). "Top 100 players of the decade". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 14, 2010.
  26. ^ Bloom, Barry M. (November 9, 2015). "Junior, Hoffman highlight HOF ballot newcomers". MLB.com. Retrieved November 10, 2015.

External links

Preceded by
Jim Thome
National League Player of the Month
July 2004
Succeeded by
Barry Bonds
1995 California Angels season

The California Angels' 1995 season featured the Angels finishing in second place in the American League West with a record of 78 wins and 67 losses.

The 1995 Angels went through statistically the worst late-season collapse in Major League Baseball history. On August 16, they held a 10½-game lead over the Texas Rangers and an 11½-game lead over the Seattle Mariners, but suffered through a late season slump, including a nine-game losing streak from August 25 to September 3. They were still atop the division, leading Seattle by six games and Texas by 7½, when a second nine-game losing streak from September 13 to 23 dropped them out of first place. The Angels rebounded to win the last five scheduled games to tie Seattle for the division lead, forcing a one-game playoff to determine the division champion. Mariners ace Randy Johnson led his team to a 9–1 triumph over Angel hurler Mark Langston in the tiebreaker game, ending the Angels' season. It was the closest the Angels would come to reaching the postseason between 1986 and 2002.

2000 National League Championship Series

The 2000 National League Championship Series (NLCS), to determine the champion of Major League Baseball's National League, was played between the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals and the wild card New York Mets. The Mets and Cards used as a rally cry the 2000 hit song "Who Let the Dogs Out?" by the Baha Men.

This series pitted a pair of teams that were former division rivals. In the mid-1980s, the Mets and Cardinals fought it out for supremacy in the National League East over four seasons, with each team alternating division championships between 1985 and 1988 (the Cardinals in their pennant seasons of 1985 and 1987, the Mets in their championship season of 1986 and 1988; however, the Cardinals weren't serious contenders in both of those years).The Cardinals, led by manager Tony La Russa, had played through the 2000 season in relatively businesslike fashion. They had won the National League Central division, and swept the Mets' fiercest rival, Atlanta Braves, in three games in the NL Division Series, making the Mets' run to the World Series much easier. However, they were struck with several injuries to key players as the playoffs began, including slugger Mark McGwire, catcher Mike Matheny, and the sudden, unexplained wildness of rookie pitcher Rick Ankiel.

The Mets, on the other hand, engaged in battle with the Braves for much of the season, eventually falling one game short of a division title. They matched up with the San Francisco Giants in the Division Series. After dropping the first game, they would rebound to win the following three games in heart-stopping fashion, including a thirteenth inning walk off home run from Benny Agbayani to win Game 3 and an improbable one-hit shutout by Bobby Jones to win the clinching Game 4. As noted above, the Mets thanked the Cardinals for making their run to the World Series much easier.It was the first NLCS since 1990 not to feature the Braves.

The Mets would go on to lose to the New York Yankees in the World Series in five games.

2000 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2000 season was the team's 119th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 109th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 95-67 during the season, their best finish since 1987, and won the National League Central division by ten games over the Cincinnati Reds. In the playoffs the Cardinals defeated the Atlanta Braves 3 games to 0 in the NLDS but lost to the New York Mets 4 games to 1 in the NLCS.

The Cardinals sweep of the Braves in the NLDS was notable because it made the Mets run to their first World Series appearance since their championship season of 1986 much easier. The Braves had eliminated the Mets from the playoffs on the final day of the 1998 season and in the 1999 NLCS.Catcher Mike Matheny and outfielder Jim Edmonds won Gold Gloves this year. Matheny was acquired from the Toronto Blue Jays during the off-season, while Edmonds was acquired from the Anaheim Angels less than a week before the start of the season.

2001 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2001 season was the team's 120th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 110th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 93-69 during the season and finished tied for first in the National League Central division with the Houston Astros. Both the Cardinals and Astros finished five games ahead of the third-place Chicago Cubs. Because the best two teams in the National League were both from the Central Division, the Astros were awarded the NL Central champion seed in the playoffs due to a better head-to-head record, and the Cardinals were seeded as the wild-card.The Cardinals were granted the right to claim the National League Central Division Co-Championship, which they still honor today. In the playoffs the Cardinals lost to the eventual World Champion Arizona Diamondbacks 3 games to 2 in the NLDS.

Third baseman/Outfielder Albert Pujols won the Rookie of the Year Award this year, batting .329, with 37 home runs and 130 RBIs. Second baseman Fernando Viña and outfielder Jim Edmonds won Gold Gloves in 2001.

This was also Jack Buck's final season as the team's broadcaster.

2002 National League Championship Series

The 2002 National League Championship Series (NLCS) was a Major League Baseball playoff series played from October 9 to 14 to determine the champion of the National League, between the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals and the wild-card qualifying San Francisco Giants. It was a rematch of the 1987 NLCS, in which the Cardinals defeated the Giants in seven games. The Cardinals, by virtue of being a division winner, had the home field advantage.

The two teams were victorious in the NL Division Series (NLDS), with the Cardinals defeating the West Division champion Arizona Diamondbacks three games to none, and the Giants defeating the East Division champion and heavily favored Atlanta Braves three games to two.

The Giants won the series in five games but were defeated by the Anaheim Angels in seven games in the World Series.

2002 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2002 season was the team's 121st season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 111th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 97-65 during the season and won the National League Central division by 13 games over the Houston Astros. In the playoffs, the Cardinals defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks 3 games to 0 in the NLDS but lost to the San Francisco Giants 4 games to 1 in the NLCS.

Second baseman Fernando Viña, shortstop Édgar Rentería, third baseman Scott Rolen, and outfielder Jim Edmonds each won Gold Gloves this year.

On June 18, long-time broadcaster Jack Buck died at the age of 77, while four days later, pitcher Darryl Kile was found dead in a Chicago hotel room, at age 33.

2003 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2003 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 74th midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues constituting Major League Baseball, and celebrated the 70th anniversary of the inaugural All-Star Game played in Chicago, Illinois in 1933.

The game was held on July 15, 2003 at U.S. Cellular Field, the home of the Chicago White Sox of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 7–6, thus awarding an AL team (which was eventually the New York Yankees) home-field advantage in the 2003 World Series. This game was the first All-Star Game to award home-field advantage in the World Series to the winning league, a rule that stemmed from a controversial 7–7 tie in the previous year's edition. In the days leading up to the game, Fox advertised it with the tagline: "This time it counts." Subsequent editions altered the slogan to "This one counts" to reflect the new method of determining the World Series' home-field advantage; that arrangement ended with the 2016 edition, where the AL team (which became the Cleveland Indians) also won home-field advantage; the AL would win the next six years, as well as the last four. The winning league had a 9-5 record in the corresponding year's World Series, with the AL going 6-5 in the 11 years it won the All Star Game and the NL going 3-0 in the three years it won the All Star Game.

This All-Star Game marked the seventh All-Star appearance for the Naval Station Great Lakes color guard from Waukegan, Illinois, who this year was joined by police officers from the Kane County Sheriff's Department who presented the Canadian and American flags in the outfield. Both the five-man color guard and the sheriff's department officers accompanied Michael Bublé, who sang O Canada, and Vanessa Carlton, who sang The Star-Spangled Banner. Bublé's performance of "O Canada" was not televised until after the game in the Chicago area, while Carlton's performance was followed by fireworks that shot off the U.S. Cellular Field scoreboard.

2003 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2003 season was the team's 122nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 112th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 85-77 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League Central division, three games behind the Chicago Cubs, who won the NL Central at 88-74, and two behind the NL Central runners-up, the Houston Astros (87-75).

Catcher Mike Matheny, shortstop Édgar Rentería, third baseman Scott Rolen, and outfielder Jim Edmonds won Gold Gloves this year.

2004 Major League Baseball season

The 2004 Major League Baseball season ended when the Boston Red Sox defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in a four-game World Series sweep. This season was particularly notable since the Red Sox championship broke the 86-year-long popular myth known as the Curse of the Bambino. The Red Sox were also the first team in MLB history and the third team from a major North American professional sports league to ever come back from a 3–0 postseason series deficit, in the ALCS against the New York Yankees.

The Montreal Expos would play their last season in Montreal, before re-locating to Washington DC, becoming the Washington Nationals in 2005.

2004 National League Championship Series

The 2004 National League Championship Series (NLCS) was a Major League Baseball playoff series played from October 13 to 21 to determine the champion of the National League, between the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals and the wild-card qualifying Houston Astros. This marked the first time in either Major League that two teams from the Central Division met in a Championship Series.

In a series in which all seven games were won by the home team, the Cardinals won 4–3 to advance to the World Series against the American League champion Boston Red Sox. The Red Sox reached their first World Series since 1986, with the Cardinals playing in their first since 1987. While the NLCS was an exciting back-and-forth series, it was overshadowed in media attention by Boston's comeback in the ALCS.

The Cardinals would go on to lose in a sweep to the Boston Red Sox in the World Series in four games.

2004 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2004 season was the team's 123rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 113th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 105-57 during the season, the most wins of any Cardinals team since 1944, and the first Cardinal team to win 100 or more games since 1985, and won the National League Central division by 13 games over the NL Wild-Card Champion Houston Astros. In the playoffs the Cardinals defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers 3 games to 1 in the NLDS and the Astros 4 games to 3 in the NLCS to reach their first World Series since 1987. In the World Series the Cardinals faced the Boston Red Sox and were swept 4 games to 0. It was the final World Series played at Busch Memorial Stadium. Because the American League had home-field advantage as a result of winning the All-Star Game, Busch Memorial Stadium was where the Curse of the Bambino died.Catcher Mike Matheny, third baseman Scott Rolen, and outfielder Jim Edmonds won Gold Gloves this year.

2005 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2005 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 76th playing of the midseason exhibition baseball game between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 12, 2005 at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan, the home of the Detroit Tigers of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 7–5, thus awarding an AL team (which eventually came to be the Chicago White Sox) home-field advantage in the 2005 World Series. The game was when Rawlings first previewed the Coolflo batting helmets.

2005 National League Championship Series

The 2005 National League Championship Series (NLCS), the second round of the 2005 National League playoffs, matched the Central Division champion and defending league champion St. Louis Cardinals against the wild card qualifier Houston Astros, a rematch of the 2004 NLCS. The Cardinals, by virtue of having the best record in the NL during the 2005 season, had the home-field advantage. The Astros won the series four games to two, and became the National League champions; they faced the American League champion Chicago White Sox in the 2005 World Series, where the Astros lost to the White Sox in a sweep in four games.

The Cardinals and Astros were victorious in the NL Division Series (NLDS), with the Cardinals defeating the West Division champion San Diego Padres three games to none, and the Astros defeating the East Division champion Atlanta Braves three games to one. St. Louis manager Tony La Russa, who won AL pennants with the Oakland Athletics in 1988–89–90 and the NL flag in 2004, fell short in his bid to become the first manager in history to win multiple pennants in both major leagues, although he did so in 2006 and again in 2011. The NLCS also closed with the last game ever played at St. Louis' Busch Stadium (II), which the Cardinals departed after 40 seasons.

2005 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2005 season was the team's 124th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 114th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 100-62 during the season and won the National League Central division by 11 games over the NL Wild-Card Champion and eventual NL Champion Houston Astros. In the playoffs the Cardinals swept the San Diego Padres 3 games to 0 in the NLDS. However, the Cardinals lost to the Astros 4 games to 2 in the NLCS.

The season was the last one played in Busch Memorial Stadium by the Cardinals and they moved to the new Busch Stadium the next year. The Cardinals also moved their radio broadcasts from KMOX after a 55-year affiliation to KTRS after the season. After the 2010 season, the Cardinals would move their radio broadcasts from KTRS back to KMOX, starting in 2011.

First baseman Albert Pujols won the MVP Award this year, batting .330, with 41 home runs and 117 RBIs. Chris Carpenter won the Cy Young Award this year, with a 2.83 ERA, 21 wins, and 213 strikeouts. Outfielder Jim Edmonds won a Gold Glove this year. The Cardinals pitching staff led Major League Baseball by having the lowest (ERA) (3.49), conceding the fewest earned runs (560) and pitching the most complete games (15).

2006 National League Championship Series

The 2006 National League Championship Series (NLCS), the second round of the 2006 National League playoffs, began on October 12 and ended on October 19; it was scheduled to begin on October 11, but was postponed a day because of inclement weather. The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the heavily favored New York Mets in seven games to advance to the 2006 World Series against the Detroit Tigers.

The Cardinals and the Mets took the series to the limit, reaching the 9th inning of Game 7 tied at 1–1. The Cardinals took the lead with Yadier Molina's two-run home run off Mets reliever Aaron Heilman in the 9th to put his team ahead, 3–1. Adam Wainwright would then hold the Mets scoreless in the bottom of the 9th to give St. Louis their second pennant in three years and 17th in club history, placing them one behind the New York/San Francisco Giants and the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers for most in NL modern history (since 1903). The Cardinals were making their third consecutive appearance in the NLCS; manager Tony La Russa, who led St. Louis to the 2004 pennant and previously won AL titles with the Oakland Athletics from 1988–90, became the first manager in history to win multiple pennants in both leagues.

The Mets, handicapped after season-ending injuries to Pedro Martínez and Orlando Hernández, qualified for postseason play for the first time since 2000. They defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers three games to none in the NL Division Series, while the Cardinals defeated the San Diego Padres three games to one. The Mets had home-field advantage due to their better record in the regular season (the Mets were 97–65, the Cardinals 83–78). The Mets and Cardinals previously met in the 2000 NLCS, which the Mets won in five games.

The Cardinals would go on to defeat the Detroit Tigers in the World Series in five games.

2006 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2006 season was the team's 125th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 115th season in the National League. The season started out with a bang, as the team raced out to a 31-16 record by late May. Momentum would be slowed by injuries, as starting pitcher Mark Mulder was lost for the year, while center fielder Jim Edmonds and shortstop David Eckstein missed large amounts of playing time in the second half. Poor performance from several key players also hampered the team: starting pitcher Jason Marquis compiled a 6.02 ERA, starting pitcher Sidney Ponson was cut due to ineffectiveness, closer Jason Isringhausen blew ten saves before undergoing season-ending hip surgery in September, and catcher Yadier Molina had a poor offensive year, batting .216.

All this led to a difficult season, despite that quick start, one that included two eight-game losing streaks (the longest such streaks for the franchise since 1988) and a seven-game losing streak, losing months in June, August and September, and an 83-78 record, the worst for the Cardinals since the 1999 team finished 75-86. However, that record was still good enough to finish first in a weak National League Central. On the season's final day, the Cardinals made the playoffs for the sixth time in the last seven seasons, edging the second-place Houston Astros by a game and a half. Once the playoffs began, the lightly regarded Cardinals surprised baseball fans everywhere by beating the San Diego Padres in the four-game Division Series, beating the New York Mets in the seven-game NLCS, and beating the Detroit Tigers in the 2006 World Series four games to one, winning the tenth, and probably most unlikely, World Series championship in franchise history. Their .516 winning percentage is the lowest ever for a World Series champion. This season ironically contrasted with 2004 in that that team were considered overwhelming favorites but were swept in the World Series, resulting in a bittersweet three-year period for the Cardinals.Following the season, the Cardinals ended a 19-year association with KPLR and returned to KSDK for the first time since 1987.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at outfield

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985 and 2007), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire major league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.The phrase "at each position" was not strictly accurate until 2011, when the awards were changed to specify individual awards for left fielder, center fielder, and right fielder. Previously, the prize was presented to three outfielders irrespective of their specific position. Any combination of outfielders, often three center fielders, could win the award in the same year. Critics called for awarding a single Gold Glove for each individual outfield position, arguing that the three outfield positions are not equivalent defensively. In the 1985 American League voting, a tie for third-place resulted in the presentation of Gold Glove Awards to four outfielders (Dwayne Murphy, Gary Pettis, Dwight Evans and Dave Winfield); this scenario was repeated in the National League in 2007 (Andruw Jones, Carlos Beltrán, Aaron Rowand, and Jeff Francoeur). Father and son Bobby and Barry Bonds are the only family pair who have won Gold Glove Awards as outfielders.Roberto Clemente and Willie Mays are tied for the most Gold Gloves won among outfielders; Clemente won 12 consecutive National League awards with the Pittsburgh Pirates, as did Mays with the New York and San Francisco Giants. Four outfielders are tied for the second-highest total with 10 wins: Andruw Jones, Ken Griffey, Jr., Al Kaline, and Ichiro Suzuki. There is one 9-time winner, Torii Hunter, who won his awards consecutively. There have been six 8-time winners (Barry Bonds, Evans, Paul Blair, Andre Dawson, Jim Edmonds, and Garry Maddox), and four 7-time awardees (Winfield, Curt Flood, Larry Walker, Devon White. Yastremski, Murphy and Kirby Puckett each won six American League awards; there have been seven 5-time winners and six 4-time winners as well. Darin Erstad won a Gold Glove as a first baseman in 2004 after winning two awards in the outfield (2000, 2002), making him the only player to win the award as an infielder and an outfielder.Nine outfielders have posted errorless Gold Glove-winning seasons: seven in the American League and two in the National League. The only player to accomplish the feat twice was Mickey Stanley, who posted a 1.000 fielding percentage in 1968 and 1970. Other outfielders who have played complete seasons without an error include Flood (1966), Clemente (1972), Yastrzemski (1977), Hunter (2008), Ken Berry (1972), Bernie Williams (2000), Vernon Wells (2005), and Joe Rudi, who played only 44 games in the outfield in 1975 while appearing in 91 games at first base. Murphy leads all outfield winners with 507 putouts in 1980, and Jones leads National Leaguers with 493 (1999). Clemente leads all winners in assists; he had 27 in 1961, and American League leader Kaline had 23 in 1958. Jesse Barfield doubled off eight runners in consecutive seasons (1986 and 1987) for the Toronto Blue Jays, while Dave Parker leads all winners with nine double plays in 1977 for the Pirates.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

St. Louis Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals are an American professional baseball team based in St. Louis, Missouri. The Cardinals compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. Busch Stadium has been their home ballpark since 2006. One of the most successful franchises in baseball history, the Cardinals have won 11 World Series championships, the second-most in Major League Baseball (behind the New York Yankees) and the most in the National League. Their 19 National League pennants rank third in NL history. In addition, St. Louis has won 14 division titles in the East and Central divisions.

While still in the old American Association (AA), named then as the St. Louis Browns, the team won four AA league championships, qualifying them to play in the professional baseball championship tournament (a forerunner of the modern World Series, established 1903) of that era. They tied in 1885 and won outright in 1886 and lost in 1888 for the early trophy Hall Cup versus the New York Giants. The others both times against the Chicago Cubs (originally the Chicago White Stockings then), in the first meetings of the Cardinals–Cubs rivalry between nearby cities of St. Louis and Chicago that continues to this day.

With origins as one of the early professional baseball clubs in St. Louis and the nation, entrepreneur Chris von der Ahe purchased a barnstorming club in 1881, then known as the Brown Stockings, and established them as charter members of the old American Association (AA) base ball league which played 1882 to 1891, the following season. Upon the discontinuation of the AA, St. Louis joined the continuing National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, later known simply as the National League, (organized in 1876), in 1892; at that time, they were called the Browns (not to be confused with a later team also known as the St. Louis Browns in the American League, 1902-1953) and also as the Perfectos before they were officially renamed eight years later as the Cardinals in 1900.

Cardinals achievements that have impacted MLB and sports events in general include manager/owner Branch Rickey's pioneering of the farm system, Rogers Hornsby's two batting Triple Crowns, Dizzy Dean's 30-win season in 1934, Stan Musial's 17 MLB and 29 NL records, Bob Gibson's 1.12 earned run average (ERA) in 1968, Whitey Herzog's Whiteyball, Mark McGwire breaking the single-season home run record in 1998, and the 2011 championship team's unprecedented comebacks. The Cardinals have won 105 or more games in four different seasons and won 100 or more a total of nine times. Cardinals players have won 20 league MVPs, four batting Triple Crowns, and three Cy Young Awards. Baseball Hall of Fame inductees include Lou Brock, Dizzy Dean, Bob Gibson, Whitey Herzog, Rogers Hornsby, Joe Medwick, Stan Musial, Branch Rickey, Red Schoendienst, Ozzie Smith, and Bruce Sutter.

In 2018, Forbes valued the Cardinals at $1.9 billion, making them the 7th-most valuable franchise in MLB; their revenue the previous year was $319 million, and their operating income was $40.0 million. Since their purchase in 1995, owner William DeWitt, Jr.'s investment group has seen enormous growth from the $147 million purchase price. John Mozeliak is the President of Baseball Operations, Mike Girsch is the general manager and Mike Shildt is the manager. The Cardinals are renowned for their strong fan support: despite being in one of the sport's mid-level markets, they routinely see attendances among the league's highest, and are consistently among the Top 3 in MLB in local television ratings.

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