Jim Doran

James Robert Doran (August 11, 1927 – June 29, 1994) was a National Football League (NFL) wide receiver for the Detroit Lions (1951–1959) and the Dallas Cowboys (1960–1961). He played college football at Iowa State University. He was a two-way player, playing both on offense and defense. He played 94 games as a defensive lineman, usually defensive end, and 115 games as a tight end.

Jim Doran
James R. Doran - 1953 Detroit Lions NFL World Champions Football Photo Album Year Book (cropped)
No. 20, 83
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:August 11, 1927
Beaver, Iowa
Died:June 30, 1994 (aged 66)
Lake City, Iowa
Career information
High school:Beaver (IA)
College:Iowa State
NFL Draft:1951 / Round: 5 / Pick: 55
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:115
Receptions:212
Receiving yards:3,667
Touchdowns:24
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Because of the small size of Beaver High School, it had no football program, so Doran practiced basketball and baseball. His first exposure to the sport was at Buena Vista College in the fall of 1947, on the "B" team, joining after a short stint in the navy during World War II. He played defensive tackle despite being a relative lightweight at 175 pounds.

Doran transferred to Iowa State University in 1948, joining the track team as a sprinter and throwing the shot put. In 1949, he helped the team post a 5–3–1 record, the school's first winning football season in a span of 14 years, and being named to the All-Big Seven team at offensive end, with 689 yards on 34 catches, breaking the single-season Big Seven receiving mark by over 200 yards.

He also set a national college record against the Oklahoma Sooners by catching eight passes for 203 yards, a mark that remains unbroken in the Iowa State University record book.

In 1950, his 652 yards on 42 receptions and six touchdowns as a senior, earned him first-team All-American and All-Big Seven honors. He was the Cyclone's only football All-American in two decades, and more recently he was voted to the modern All-time All-Big Eight team. Doran closed out his Cyclone career owning virtually every Iowa State and Big Seven receiving mark. He also played in the Hula Bowl and East–West Shrine Game in 1951.[1]

In 1997, he was inducted into the Iowa State University Athletics Hall of Fame. In 2005, he was inducted into the Iowa Sports Hall of Fame. In 1983, he was inducted into the Iowa High School Football Hall of Fame, despite never playing high school football. Doran was deemed an "outstanding example for the young men of the state of Iowa".

Professional career

Detroit Lions

Doran was selected by the Detroit Lions in the fifth round (55th overall) of the 1951 NFL Draft. He became a starter as a rookie at defensive end. He also was used on the offensive side, registering 10 receptions, 225 receiving yards, a 22.5-yard average (fourth in the league) and 2 touchdowns.

In 1952, he was voted the most valuable player on a Lions team that won the 1952 NFL Championship Game. His teammates nicknamed him the Graham Cracker, because of his ferocious rushing of Otto Graham as a defensive end, in all of the Detroit-Cleveland games he played in.

In 1953, he started playing both offense and defense because of injuries to teammates.[2] The biggest play of his pro career occurred in the 1953 NFL Championship Game, when he caught a 33-yard touchdown pass, that pulled out a 17–16 victory.[3] Doran remained playing the offensive end position and led the Lions in receiving in 1957.

After the 1959 season, because of his age, the Lions left him off their list of players who were exempt from the 1960 NFL Expansion Draft.

Dallas Cowboys

Doran was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960 NFL Expansion Draft. He was converted into a tight end at 33 years of age, becoming the first starter at that position in franchise history, while registering 31 catches (led the team) for 554 yards (led the team) and 3 touchdowns.

At the end of the season, he had the distinction of becoming the Cowboys’ first Pro Bowl player in franchise history, and also scoring the Cowboys' first touchdown in franchise history, a 75-yard pass from Eddie LeBaron against the Pittsburgh Steelers on September 24, 1960.

Doran started the franchise's legacy of Pro Bowl tight ends that includes: Dick Bielski, Lee Folkins, Mike Ditka, Billy Joe Dupree, Jackie Smith, Doug Cosbie, Jay Novacek and Jason Witten.

He was released after playing two seasons in Dallas and a total of 11 seasons in the NFL, compiling 212 receptions for 3,667 yards and 24 touchdowns.

Denver Broncos

On July 22, 1962, Doran signed as a free agent with the Denver Broncos of the American Football League, but his season ended after injuring his back during a victory against the Dallas Texans and being placed on the injured reserve list on August 27.

Personal life

Doran rejoined his old Detroit Lions head coach, Buddy Parker, as an assistant with the Pittsburgh Steelers for the 1964 and 1965 seasons.

He returned to Iowa to farm after football. He died on June 29, 1994, of a heart attack.

References

  1. ^ "Des Moines Sunday Register's Iowa Sports Hall of Fame". Retrieved February 3, 2018.
  2. ^ "Life in the fast Layne". NFL Top 40. NFL Publishing. Retrieved 2008-09-21. He was a defensive player. At least that's what we thought.-Otto Graham
  3. ^ "Browns On Edge For Payoff". Retrieved February 3, 2018.

External links

1949 All-Big Seven Conference football team

The 1949 All-Big Six Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Six Conference teams for the 1949 college football season. The selectors for the 1949 season included the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP). Players who were the consensus first-team selection of both the AP and UP are shown in bold.

1949 Iowa State Cyclones football team

The 1949 Iowa State Cyclones football team represented Iowa State College of Agricultural and Mechanic Arts (later renamed Iowa State University) in the Big Seven Conference during the 1949 college football season. In their third year under head coach Abe Stuber, the Cyclones compiled a 5–3–1 record (3–3 against conference opponents), tied for third place in the conference, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 169 to 134. They played their home games at Clyde Williams Field in Ames, Iowa.

The team's regular starting lineup consisted of left end Dean Laun, left tackle Lowell Titus, left guard Joe Brubaker, center Rod Rust, right guard Billy Myers, right tackle John Tillo, right end Jim Doran, quarterback Don Ferguson, left halfback Lawrence Paulson, right halfback Bob Angle, and fullback Bill Chauncey. Dean Laun was the team captain.The team's statistical leaders included Bill Chauncey with 544 rushing yards and 30 points scored (five touchdowns), Bill Weeks with 1,247 passing yards, Jim Doran with 688 receiving yards, and Bob Angle with 18 points (three touchdowns). Three Iowa State players were selected as first-team all-conference players: Doran, Weeks, and Lowell Titus.

1950 All-Big Seven Conference football team

The 1950 All-Big Seven Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Seven Conference teams for the 1950 college football season. The selectors for the 1950 season included the United Press (UP).

1950 Iowa State Cyclones football team

The 1950 Iowa State Cyclones football team represented Iowa State College of Agricultural and Mechanic Arts (later renamed Iowa State University) in the Big Seven Conference during the 1950 college football season. In their fourth year under head coach Abe Stuber, the Cyclones compiled a 3–6–1 record (2–3–1 against conference opponents), finished in fifth place in the conference, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 200 to 174. They played their home games at Clyde Williams Field in Ames, Iowa.

The team's regular starting lineup on offense consisted of left end Sy Wilhelmi, left tackle Lowell Titus, left guard Stan Campbell, center Rollie Arns, right guard Bob Matheson, right tackle John Tillo, right end Jim Doran, quarterback Bill Weeks, left halfback Melvin Meling, right halfback Mark Rothacker, and fullback Maury Schnell. Vince Beacom was the team captain.The team's statistical leaders included Maury Schnell with 490 rushing yards, Bill Weeks with 1,552 passing yards, Jim Doran with 651 receiving yards, and Doran and Weeks with 36 points (six touchdowns) each. Two Iowa State players were selected as first-team all-conference players: Doran and Weeks.

1952 Detroit Lions season

The 1952 Detroit Lions season resulted in the Lions winning their second National Football League (NFL) championship, having won their first championship 17 years earlier in 1935. The team's co-captains were halfback Bob Hoernschemeyer and defensive tackle John Prchlik, and defensive end Jim Doran was selected as the team's most valuable player. In their third year under head coach Buddy Parker, the 1952 Lions compiled a 9–3 record during the regular season, finished in a tie with the Los Angeles Rams for first place in the NFL's National Conference, defeated the Rams in a tiebreaker game, and defeated the Cleveland Browns, 17–7, in the 1952 NFL Championship Game at Municipal Stadium in Cleveland.

The 1952 Lions outscored opponents 354 to 192 in 12 regular season games and ranked first in the NFL with an average of 29.5 points scored per game. The offense was led by quarterback Bobby Layne who ranked second in the NFL with 2,410 yards of total offense – 1,999 passing and 411 rushing. End Cloyce Box led the NFL with 15 touchdowns, including nine touchdown catches in the final three games of the regular season. For the third consecutive year, Bob Hoernschemeyer was the team's leading rusher with 457 yards and an average of 4.3 yards per carry. Jack Christiansen led the NFL with an average of 21.5 yards per punt return, returned two punts for touchdowns, and ranked fourth in the NFL with 731 punt and kick return yards.

The Lions' defense ranked first in the NFL in points allowed, allowing 16 points per game during the regular season. Defensive back Bob Smith ranked among the NFL leaders with a 90-yard interception return (2nd), nine interceptions (3rd), and 184 interception return yards (3rd). Smith was also the team's punter and ranked second in the NFL with an average of 44.7 yards per punt. Six players from the 1952 Lions team, Layne, Christiansen, halfback Doak Walker, defensive back Yale Lary, and offensive linemen Lou Creekmur and Dick Stanfel, were later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

1953 NFL Championship Game

The 1953 National Football League championship game was the 21st annual championship game, held on December 27 at Briggs Stadium in Detroit.The defending NFL champion Detroit Lions (10–2) of the Western Conference were led by quarterback Bobby Layne and running back Doak Walker, and the Cleveland Browns (11–1) of the Eastern Conference were led by head coach Paul Brown and quarterback Otto Graham. The game was a rematch of the previous year, which was won by the Lions, 17–7.

This was the Browns' fourth consecutive NFL championship game appearance since joining the league in 1950, and they were favored by three points.The Lions were attempting to become the third team in the championship game era (since 1933) to win two titles in a row, following the Chicago Bears (1940, 1941) and Philadelphia Eagles (1948, 1949).The home underdog Lions rallied in the fourth quarter with a late touchdown and conversion to win by a single point, 17–16. The two teams met the following year for a third consecutive title match-up.

1957 Detroit Lions season

The 1957 Detroit Lions season resulted in the Lions winning their fourth and most recent NFL championship.In the penultimate regular season game with the Cleveland Browns on December 8, hall of fame quarterback Bobby Layne was lost for the season with a broken right ankle. With backup Tobin Rote in at quarterback in the second quarter, the Lions won that game and overcame a ten-point deficit at halftime the following week to defeat the Chicago Bears 21–13, whom they had lost to three weeks earlier at home. They ended the regular season with three consecutive wins and an 8–4 record. All four losses were within the Western Conference, splitting the two games with all but the Green Bay Packers, whom they swept.

Detroit tied with the San Francisco 49ers (8–4) for the conference title, which required a tiebreaker playoff game. Played at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco on December 22, the 49ers entered the game as three point favorites. Down by twenty points in the third quarter, Detroit rallied with a 24–0 run to win 31–27.The Lions were home underdogs for next week the NFL championship game on against Cleveland. Played on December 29 at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, the Lions led 17–0 after the first quarter and won in a rout, 59–14. Through the 2017 season, the Lions have yet to return to the NFL title game (including the Super Bowl), an absence of nearly sixty years. It is the 4th-longest drought in all 4 Sports. Also the 2nd-longest drought in the NFL (Arizona Cardinals 1947).

1957 NFL Championship Game

The 1957 National Football League championship game was the 25th annual championship game, held on December 29 at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, Michigan.The Detroit Lions (8–4), winners of the Western Conference, hosted the Cleveland Browns (9–2–1), champions of the Eastern Conference. Detroit had won the regular season game 20–7 three weeks earlier on December 8, also at Briggs Stadium, but lost quarterback Bobby Layne with a broken right ankle late in the first half. Reserve quarterback Tobin Rote, a starter the previous year with Green Bay, filled in for Layne and won that game with Cleveland, the next week at Chicago, and the tiebreaker playoff game at San Francisco.

It was the fourth pairing of the two teams in the championship game; they met previously in 1952, 1953, and 1954. The Browns were favored by three points, but the home underdog Lions scored two touchdowns in each quarter and won in a rout, 59–14.Until 2006, this was the last time that major professional teams from Michigan and Ohio met in a postseason series or game. As of 2018, this was the last playoff game played in the city of Detroit other than Super Bowl XL in 2006. The Lions other two home playoff games since 1957 (1991 and 1993) were played at the Pontiac Silverdome in nearby Pontiac, Michigan.

1960 NFL expansion draft

The 1960 NFL expansion draft was the first National Football League (NFL) draft in which a new expansion team, named the Dallas Rangers, selected its initial players. The NFL awarded Dallas, Texas a franchise to compete for revenue with Lamar Hunt's Dallas Texans of the upstart American Football League. The Dallas expansion franchise was approved too late for it to participate in the 1960 NFL draft which had been held on November 30, 1959. Dallas is the only NFL expansion team to not have had the benefit of a college draft in its first year.So that the Rangers (Cowboys) could become competitive with existing teams, the league gave them the opportunity to select current players from existing teams. That selection was provided by the expansion draft, held on March 13, 1960. In this draft, the Rangers chose 36 players from the existing 12 teams. The NFL also assigned the rights to 1960 NFL draft picks Don Meredith (who had been drafted by the Chicago Bears) and Don Perkins (drafted by the Baltimore Colts) to the Cowboys for a couple of future draft picks.22 players made the active roster that season. 11 players played only one year with Dallas. Eight players (including Jack Patera, who was injured early in the 1961 season) played in 1960 and 1961. The three remaining players from the draft started for several years, including: Bob Fry, Tackle, 1960–64; Jerry Tubbs, Linebacker, 1960–66; and Frank Clarke, Wide Receiver, 1960–67.On March 19, 1960, the Rangers renamed themselves the Cowboys.

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2015 West Lancashire Borough Council election

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Andrew Jeptha

Andrew Daries Jeptha (born 30 December 1879) was the first black boxer to win a British boxing title, winning the welterweight title in London on 25 March 1907. However, Jeptha is not often recognised as the first black British boxing champion.

Billy Joe DuPree

Billy Joe DuPree (born March 7, 1950) is a former professional American football tight end in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Michigan State University.

Buena Vista University

Buena Vista University is a private four-year college in Storm Lake, Iowa. Founded in 1891 as Buena Vista College, it is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church. The university's 60-acre (240,000 m2) campus is situated on the shores of Storm Lake, a 3,200-acre (13 km2) natural lake. BVU's academic programs feature a balance between traditional liberal arts courses and hands-on learning opportunities, such as travel and internships. The average student-to-professor ratio is 13:1.

At its inception, the college was housed in the Storm Lake Opera House, where it remained for only a year. Old Main, the college's first building, opened in 1892, and was occupied by faculty and students until it burned down in 1956. Major construction projects in the 1950s and 1960s extended the college, which soon included three dormitories, a library, and a number of classroom buildings.

The college gained accreditation in 1952, and began to grant degrees under the authority of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. The first graduate degrees were offered in 1995, at which time the college became Buena Vista University.

The main campus of Buena Vista University offers a 4-year residential collegiate experience and offers classes in 42 majors. Seventeen additional locations throughout Iowa and online serve working adult and graduate students as part of the Graduate & Professional Studies program. The university is ranked in the top 20 Midwestern Comprehensive Colleges, as reported by U.S.News and World Report's college rankings.

Dick Bielski

Richard Adam Bielski (born September 7, 1932) is a former American football player and coach. He played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the Philadelphia Eagles, Dallas Cowboys, and Baltimore Colts. Bielski played college football at the University of Maryland.

Erroll Garner

Erroll Louis Garner (June 15, 1923 – January 2, 1977; some sources say b. 1921) was an American jazz pianist and composer known for his swing playing and ballads. His best-known composition, the ballad "Misty", has become a jazz standard. Scott Yanow of Allmusic calls him "one of the most distinctive of all pianists" and a "brilliant virtuoso." He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6363 Hollywood Blvd.

Fred Dugan

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List of Iowa State Cyclones football All-Americans

The Iowa State Cyclones college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and represents the Iowa State University in the Big 12 Conference (Big 12). All-America selections are individual player recognitions made after each season when numerous publications release lists of their ideal team. The NCAA recognizes five All-America lists: the Associated Press (AP), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). In order for an honoree to earn a "consensus" selection, he must be selected as first team in three of the five lists recognized by the NCAA, and "unanimous" selections must be selected as first team in all five lists.Since the establishment of the team in 1892, Iowa State has had 16 players honored a total of 24 times as First Team All-America for their performance on the field of play. Included in these selections are 4 consensus selections, 2 of which were unanimous selections. The most recent All-American from Iowa State came after the 2011 season, when Kelechi Osemele was named First Team All-America by Sports Illustrated.

Robert Doran

Robert Doran may refer to:

Robert M. Doran (born 1939), Canadian theologian

Robert S. Doran (born 1937), American mathematician

Robert W. Doran, New Zealand computer scientist

Bob Doran, fictional character in the novel Ulysses

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