Jim Bunning's perfect game

On June 21, 1964, Jim Bunning of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched the seventh perfect game in Major League Baseball history, defeating the New York Mets 6-0 in the first game of a doubleheader at Shea Stadium. A father of seven children at the time, Bunning pitched his perfect game on Father's Day. One of Bunning's daughters, Barbara, was in attendance, as was his wife, Mary.[1] Needing only 90 pitches to complete his masterpiece, Bunning struck out 10 batters, including six of the last nine he faced; the last two strikeouts were of the last two batters he faced: George Altman and John Stephenson.

The perfect game was the first regular season perfect game since Charlie Robertson's perfect game in 1922 (Don Larsen had pitched a perfect game in between, in the 1956 World Series), as well as the first in modern-day National League history (two perfect games had been pitched in 1880). It was also the first no-hitter by a Phillies pitcher since Johnny Lush no-hit the Brooklyn Superbas on May 1, 1906.

Bunning, who no-hit the Boston Red Sox while with the Detroit Tigers in 1958, joined Cy Young as the only pitchers to throw no-hitters in both the National and American Leagues; he has since been joined by Nolan Ryan, Hideo Nomo and Randy Johnson. The perfect game also made Bunning the third pitcher, after Young and Addie Joss, to throw a perfect game and an additional no-hitter; Sandy Koufax, Johnson, Mark Buehrle and Roy Halladay have since joined him (the latter of these pitchers pitched his additional no-hitter in the 2010 National League Division Series after pitching his perfect game earlier in the season).

As the perfect game developed, Bunning defied the baseball superstition that no one should talk about a no-hitter in progress, speaking to his teammates about the perfect game to keep himself relaxed and loosen up his teammates. Bunning had abided by the tradition during a near-no hitter a few weeks before, determining afterwards that keeping quiet didn’t help.[2]

Gus Triandos, Bunning's catcher, had also caught Hoyt Wilhelm's no-hitter on September 20, 1958 while with the Baltimore Orioles, becoming the first catcher to catch no-hitters in both leagues.

Jim Bunning's perfect game
Jim Bunning as ballplayer
Jim Bunning with the Detroit Tigers in 1955.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia Phillies 1 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 8 0
New York Mets 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DateJune 21, 1964
VenueShea Stadium
CityQueens, New York
Managers
Umpires

Boxscore

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia Phillies (37–23) 1 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 6 8 0
New York Mets (20–46) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
WP: Jim Bunning (7–2)   LP: Tracy Stallard (4–9)

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-08-18. Retrieved 2015-09-04.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Zolecki, Todd (June 12, 2014). "Bunning reflects on Fathers' Day perfect game". MLB.com.

External links

1964 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1964 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 82nd season for the franchise in Philadelphia. The Phillies finished in a second-place tie with the Cincinnati Reds. Both posted a record of 92–70, finishing one game behind the National League (NL) and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals, and just two games ahead of fourth-place San Francisco. Gene Mauch managed the Phillies, who played their home games at Connie Mack Stadium.

The team is notable for being in first place in the National League since the opening day, and then suffering a drastic collapse during the final two weeks of the season. The "Phold of '64", as it became known, is one of the most infamous collapses in baseball history.

2004 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 2004 throughout the world.

2015 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 2015 throughout the world.

Bobby Wine

Robert Paul Wine Sr. (born September 17, 1938) is a former shortstop, coach and manager in Major League Baseball. An excellent fielder who struggled as a batsman, Wine spent 12 seasons in the National League with the Philadelphia Phillies (1960; 1962–68) and the Montreal Expos (1969–72). He won the NL Gold Glove Award in 1963.

By Saam

Byrum Fred "By" Saam, Jr. (September 11, 1914 – January 16, 2000) was an American sportscaster. He was best known as the first full-time voice of baseball in Philadelphia.

Charlie Robertson

Charles Culbertson Robertson (January 31, 1896 – August 23, 1984) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher, and is best remembered for throwing a perfect game in 1922. He was the last surviving player who played at least one game for the 1919 Chicago White Sox, having died in 1984.

Robertson was born in Dexter, Texas, grew up in Nocona, Texas, and graduated from Nocona High School in 1915. Charles attended Austin College from 1917 until 1919. He began his career with the Chicago White Sox in 1919 at the age of 23. Robertson was an average player for most of his career, having a career record of 49–80 and never winning more than he lost during a single season. His main pitch throughout his career was a slow curveball which he often threw on the first pitch to a batter on any side of the plate, followed by a fastball up in the zone.

Ed Sudol

Edward Lawrence Sudol (September 13, 1920 – December 10, 2004) was a professional baseball umpire who worked in the National League from 1957 to 1977. Sudol umpired 3,247 major league games in his 21-year career, wearing uniform number 16 for most of his career. He umpired in three World Series (1965, 1971, and 1977), three League Championship Series (1969, 1973, and 1976) and three All-Star Games (1961, 1964 and 1974). Sudol was also the home plate umpire for Jim Bunning's perfect game in 1964, as well as Bill Singer's no-hitter in 1970. In 1974, he was the second base umpire when Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth's career home run record.Among the epic games he worked in his career, Sudol also had the distinction of being the home plate umpire for the three longest games in New York Mets history. On September 11, 1974, the St. Louis Cardinals won a marathon night game against the New York Mets, after 7 hours 4 minutes, and 25 innings, also tied for the longest game to a decision in major league history. The Mets went to the plate 103 times, a record in a major league game; the Cards were not far behind with 99 plate appearances. All told, a record 175 official at-bats were recorded, with a major-league record 45 runners stranded. Only a thousand fans were still at Shea Stadium when the game ended at 3:13 a.m. ET. This was the longest game played to a decision without a suspension.

On April 15, 1968, the Houston Astros defeated the Mets, 1-0, in a 24-inning game at the Houston Astrodome. The 6-hour, 6-min. contest, remains the longest shutout game in Major League history. It also had the most scoreless innings (23) in a major-league game. Sudol was the home plate umpire in game two of the longest doubleheader in Major League history came on May 31, 1964. The San Francisco Giants beat the New York Mets 5-3 in nine innings in the day's first game at Shea Stadium, and then won the nightcap 8-6 after 23 innings. The two games lasted a combined nine hours, 52 minutes.

Sudol played in the minor leagues from 1940 to 1953, mainly as a first baseman. As Sudol realized his playing career was drawing to a close, he enrolled in an umpiring school in Daytona Beach, and after umpiring in the minor leagues for multiple years, was called up to the National League in 1957.Sudol died on December 10, 2004, in Daytona Beach; he had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Jim Bunning

James Paul David Bunning (October 23, 1931 – May 26, 2017) was an American professional baseball pitcher and politician who represented Kentucky in both chambers of the United States Congress. He is the sole Major League Baseball athlete to have been elected to both the United States Senate and the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Bunning pitched from 1955 to 1971 for the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Los Angeles Dodgers. When Bunning retired, he had the second-highest total career strikeouts in Major League history; he currently ranks 18th. As a member of the Phillies, Bunning pitched the seventh perfect game in Major League Baseball history on June 21, 1964, the first game of a Father's Day doubleheader at Shea Stadium, against the New York Mets. The perfect game was the first since 1880 in the National League. Bunning was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1996 after election by the Hall's Veterans Committee.

After retiring from baseball, Bunning returned to his native northern Kentucky and was elected to the Fort Thomas city council, then the Kentucky Senate, in which he served as minority leader. In 1986, Bunning was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky's 4th congressional district, and served in the House from 1987 to 1999. He was elected to the United States Senate from Kentucky in 1998 and served two terms as the Republican junior U.S. Senator. In July 2009, he announced that he would not run for re-election in 2010. Bunning gave his farewell speech to the Senate on December 9, 2010, and was succeeded by Rand Paul on January 3, 2011.

John Stephenson (baseball)

John Herman Stephenson (born April 13, 1941) is a retired American professional baseball player who was a catcher in the Major Leagues from 1964 to 1973. He played for the San Francisco Giants, Chicago Cubs, New York Mets, and California Angels. On June 21, 1964, while with the Mets, he struck out for the final out of Jim Bunning's perfect game. John holds a degree from William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. He has gone on to coach extensively in the major and minor leagues as well as college.

Johnny Lush

John Charles Lush (October 8, 1885 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania – November 18, 1946 in Beverly Hills, California), was a professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1904 to 1910. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies.On May 1, 1906, while with the Phillies, the 20-year-old Lush no-hit the Brooklyn Superbas 6-0 at Brooklyn's Washington Park, besting Mal Eason—himself a no-hit pitcher on July 20 of that season. Not until Jim Bunning's perfect game in 1964 would there be another no-hitter by a Phillies pitcher.

List of Major League Baseball no-hitters

This is a list of no-hitters in Major League Baseball history. In addition, all no-hitters that were broken up in extra innings or were in shortened games are listed, although they are not currently considered official no-hitters. (Prior to 1991, a performance in which no hits were surrendered through nine innings or in a shortened game was considered an official no-hit game.) The names of those pitchers who threw a perfect game no-hitter are italicized. For combined no-hitters by two or more pitchers on the same team, each is listed with his number of innings pitched. Games which were part of a doubleheader are noted as either the first game or second game. The most recent no-hitter was pitched by Taylor Cole and Félix Peña of the Los Angeles Angels on July 12, 2019.

An official no-hit game occurs when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings thrown by the pitcher(s). In a no-hit game, a batter may still reach base via a walk, an error, a fielder's choice, an intentional walk, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference. Also, due to these methods of reaching base, it is possible for a team to score runs without getting any hits.

While the vast majority of no-hitters are shutouts, no-hit teams have managed to score runs in their respective games a number of times. Five times a team has been no-hit and still won the game: two notable victories occurred when the Cincinnati Reds defeated the Houston Colt .45s (now called the Houston Astros) 1–0 on April 23, 1964 even though they were no-hit by Houston starter Ken Johnson, and the Detroit Tigers defeated the Baltimore Orioles 2–1 on April 30, 1967 even though they were no-hit by Baltimore starter Steve Barber and reliever Stu Miller. In another four games, the home team won despite gaining no hits through eight innings, but these are near no-hitters under the 1991 rule that nine no-hit innings must be completed in order for a no-hitter to be credited.

The pitcher who holds the record for the shortest time between no-hitters is Johnny Vander Meer, the only pitcher in history to throw no-hitters in consecutive starts, while playing for the Cincinnati Reds in 1938. Besides Vander Meer, Allie Reynolds (in 1951), Virgil Trucks (in 1952), Nolan Ryan (in 1973), and Max Scherzer (in 2015) are the only other major leaguers to throw two no-hitters in the same regular season. Jim Maloney technically threw two no-hitters in the 1965 season, but his first one ended after he allowed a home run in the top of the 11th inning. According to the rules interpretation of the time, this was considered a no-hitter. Later that season, Maloney once again took a no-hitter into extra innings, but this time he managed to preserve the no-hitter after the Reds scored in the top half of the tenth, becoming the first pitcher to throw a complete game extra inning no-hitter since Fred Toney in 1917.Roy Halladay threw two no-hitters in 2010: a perfect game during the regular season and a no-hitter in the 2010 National League Division Series. He is the only major leaguer to have thrown no-hitters in regular season and postseason play.

The first black pitcher to toss a no-hitter was Sam Jones who did it for the Chicago Cubs in 1955. The first Latin pitcher to throw one was San Francisco Giant Juan Marichal in 1963. The first Asian pitcher to throw one was Los Angeles Dodger Hideo Nomo in 1996.

Through July 12, 2019, there have been 301 no-hitters officially recognized by Major League Baseball, 258 of them in the modern era (starting in 1901, with the formation of the American League). Joe Borden's no-hitter in 1875 is also noted, but is not recognized by Major League Baseball (see note in the chart).

List of Philadelphia Phillies no-hitters

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Philadelphia. They play in the National League East division. Also known in their early years as the "Philadelphia Quakers", pitchers for the Phillies have thrown thirteen separate no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings", though one or more batters "may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference". No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that one team in Major League Baseball has never had a pitcher accomplish the feat.Of the thirteen no-hitters pitched by Phillies players, three have been won by a score of 6–0, and three by a score of 1–0, more common than any other results. The largest margin of victory in a Phillies no-hitter was ten runs, in a 10–0 win by Chick Fraser. Charlie Ferguson's no-hitter, the first in franchise history, was a 1–0 victory, as were two of the more recent regular season no-hitters, thrown by Kevin Millwood in 2003 and Roy Halladay in 2010. Three pitchers to throw no-hitters for the Phillies have been left-handed: Johnny Lush (in 1906), Terry Mulholland (in 1990) and Cole Hamels (in 2015). The other eight pitchers were right-handed. Halladay is the only Phillies' pitcher to throw more than one no-hitter in a Phillies uniform, and others, including Hall of Famer Jim Bunning, have pitched more than one in their careers. The longest interval between Phillies no-hitters was between the games pitched by Lush and Bunning, encompassing 58 years, 1 month, and 20 days from May 1, 1906 to June 21, 1964. Conversely, the shortest interval between no-hitters was between Halladay's two 2010 no-hitters, with a total of merely four months and seven days from May 29 to October 6; the shortest gap between regular-season no-hitters was between Mulholland's and Tommy Greene's games (nine months and eight days from August 15, 1990 to May 23, 1991). Two opponents have been no-hit by the Phillies more than one time: the San Francisco Giants, who were defeated by Mulholland (in 1990) and Millwood (in 2003); and the Cincinnati Reds, who were no-hit by Rick Wise (in 1971) and Halladay (in 2010).

The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out… [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. A different umpire presided over each of the Phillies' thirteen no-hitters, including Wes Curry, who created Major League Baseball's catcher interference rule.Two perfect games, a special subcategory of no-hitter, have been pitched in Phillies history. This feat was achieved by Bunning in 1964, which was the first perfect game in the National League since 1880, and Halladay in 2010. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game."On July 25, 2015, Phillies left-hander Cole Hamels threw his first career no-hitter in a 5–0 win over the Chicago Cubs at the historic Wrigley Field. He narrowly missed completing a perfect game by walking two Cubs batters. Odubel Herrera, Phillies centerfielder, nearly dropped the game's final out at the warning track after he overran a long fly ball hit by Cubs rookie sensation Kris Bryant; Herrera, however, was able to snag the ball with an awkward sliding catch to close out the game and preserve Hamels's no-hitter. In addition to this being Cole Hamels's first no-hitter, this was the fourth no hitter caught by longtime Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz, who now has tied the MLB record for no-hitters caught.

Major League Baseball rivalries

Rivalries in the Major League Baseball have occurred between many teams and cities. Rivalries have arisen for many different reasons, the primary ones including geographic proximity, familiarity with opponents, various incidents, and cultural, linguistic, or national pride.

Mets–Phillies rivalry

The Mets–Phillies rivalry or Battle of the Broads is a Major League Baseball (MLB) rivalry between the New York Mets and Philadelphia Phillies. Both clubs are members of MLB's National League (NL) East division. The rivalry between the two clubs is said to be among the most fiercely contested in the NL. The two NL East divisional rivals have met each other recently in playoff, division, and Wild Card races. The Battle of the Broads name is a nod to both cities having the word Broad in their street names: Broadway in New York, and Broad Street in Philadelphia.

Aside from several brawls in the 1980s, the rivalry remained relatively low-key before the 2006 season, as the teams had seldom been equally good at the same time. A notable moment in their early meetings was Jim Bunning's perfect game on Father's Day of 1964, the first perfect game in Phillies history, which happened when the Mets were on a losing streak. The Phillies were near the bottom of the NL East when the Mets won the 1969 World Series and the National League pennant in 1973, while the Mets did not enjoy success in the late 1970s when the Phillies won three straight division championships. Although both teams each won a World Series in the 1980s, the Mets were not serious contenders in the Phillies' playoff years (1980, 1981, and 1983), nor did the Phillies seriously contend in the Mets' playoff years (1986 and 1988). The Mets were the Majors' worst team when the Phillies won the NL pennant in 1993, and the Phillies could not post a winning record in either of the Mets' wild-card-winning seasons of 1999 or 2000, when the Mets faced the New York Yankees in the 2000 World Series.

The rivalry intensified in the mid 2000s, as the teams battled more often for playoff position. The Mets won the division in 2006, while the Phillies won five consecutive division titles from 2007 to 2011. The Phillies' 2007 championship was won on the last day of the season as the Mets lost a seven-game lead with 17 games remaining. The Phillies broke the Curse of Billy Penn to win the 2008 World Series, while the Mets' last title came in the 1986 World Series.

In 2015, the Mets won the National League Championship Series for their fifth pennant while the Phillies entered a rebuild phase. The Mets beat the Phillies 14 times and lost 5 for a lopsided season series. The season still provided contentious moments such as, Mets pitcher Matt Harvey drilling Phillies 2nd baseman Chase Utley in retaliation for Mets players getting hit by Phillies pitchers, a benches clearing argument between Phillies coach Larry Bowa in regards to a quick pitch by Hansel Robles and a bat flip by Daniel Murphy. Phillies star Chase Utley while, traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers mid-season, injured Mets shortstop Rubén Tejada on a legal slide during Game 2 of the National League Division Series.

No-hitter

In baseball, a no-hitter (also known as a no-hit game and colloquially as a no-no) is a game in which a team was not able to record a single hit. Major League Baseball (MLB) officially defines a no-hitter as a completed game in which a team that batted in at least nine innings recorded no hits. A pitcher who prevents the opposing team from achieving a hit is said to have "thrown a no-hitter". This is a rare accomplishment for a pitcher or pitching staff: only 301 have been thrown in Major League Baseball history since 1876, an average of about two per year. In most cases in MLB, no-hitters are recorded by a single pitcher who throws a complete game; one thrown by two or more pitchers is a combined no-hitter. The most recent major league no-hitter by a single pitcher was thrown on May 7, 2019 by Mike Fiers of the Oakland Athletics against the Cincinnati Reds at the Oakland Coliseum; this was also the 300th no-hitter in MLB history. The most recent combined no-hitter was thrown on July 12, 2019 by Taylor Cole and Félix Peña of the Los Angeles Angels against the Seattle Mariners at Angel Stadium.

It is possible to reach base without a hit, most commonly by a walk, error, or being hit by a pitch. (Other possibilities include the batter reaching first after an uncaught third strike or catcher's interference.) A no-hitter in which no batters reach base at all is a perfect game, a much rarer feat. Because batters can reach base by means other than a hit, a pitcher can throw a no-hitter (though not a perfect game) and still give up runs, and even lose the game, although this is extremely uncommon and most no-hitters are also shutouts. One or more runs were given up in 25 recorded no-hitters in MLB history, most recently by Ervin Santana of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in a 3–1 win at the Cleveland Indians on July 27, 2011. On two occasions, a team has thrown a nine-inning no-hitter and still lost the game. On a further four occasions, a team has thrown a no-hitter for eight innings in a losing effort, but those four games are not officially recognized as no-hitters by Major League Baseball because the outing lasted fewer than nine innings. It is theoretically possible for opposing pitchers to throw no-hitters in the same game, although this has never happened in the majors. Two pitchers, Fred Toney and Hippo Vaughn, completed nine innings of a game on May 2, 1917 without either giving up a hit or a run; Vaughn gave up two hits and a run in the 10th inning, losing the game to Toney, who completed the extra-inning no-hitter.

Rick Wise

Richard Charles Wise (born September 13, 1945) is a former professional baseball pitcher. A right-hander, he played in Major League Baseball for 18 seasons (1964, 1966–82), primarily as a starting pitcher. He was the winning pitcher for the Boston Red Sox in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series, considered by some to be the greatest Series game ever played.

Roy Halladay's perfect game

On May 29, 2010, Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched the twentieth perfect game in Major League Baseball history, against the Florida Marlins in Sun Life Stadium. He retired all 27 batters, striking out 11. This was the first time in the modern era that two pitchers (Dallas Braden of the Oakland Athletics being the other) threw perfect games in the same month and that multiple perfect games had been achieved in the same season.

Tony Taylor (baseball)

Antonio Nemesio (Sanchez) Taylor (born December 19, 1935), is a Cuban former professional baseball second baseman, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago Cubs (1958–1960), Philadelphia Phillies (1960–1971, 1974–1976), and Detroit Tigers (1971–1973). He batted and threw right-handed. Taylor was inducted into the Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame in 2002.

Tracy Stallard

Evan Tracy Stallard (August 31, 1937 – December 6, 2017) was an American professional baseball player, a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1960 to 1966. He played with the Boston Red Sox, New York Mets and St. Louis Cardinals.Stallard is most remembered for having given up New York Yankees slugger Roger Maris' 61st home run in 1961.

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