Jim Bakken

James LeRoy Bakken (born November 2, 1940) is a former American football punter and placekicker for the St. Louis Cardinals. He was a four-time Pro Bowl selection, and was named by the voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame to the Professional Football 1960s All Decade Team, which included both NFL and American Football League players. The voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame also selected Bakken to the NFL 1970s All-Decade Team

In 1967, Bakken set the record for most field goals in a game with 7 (out of 9 attempts, also a record). The single-game record for field goals was later tied by Rich Karlis in 1989, Chris Boniol in 1996, and Billy Cundiff in 2003 before Rob Bironas broke it with 8 in a game in 2007.

Before his NFL career, Bakken played football at Madison West High School in Madison, Wisconsin. He went on to play three seasons at the University of Wisconsin, where he played on the 1960 Rose Bowl team as a sophomore and led the Big Ten in punting average in 1960 and 1961. He was named to the Madison (Wisconsin) Sports Hall of Fame in 1984, and was later inducted into the UW Athletic Department-National W Club Hall of Fame.[1] In December 2010, the annual trophy for the Big Ten's best kicker, the "Bakken-Andersen Kicker of the Year" award, was co-named in his honor.[2]

Jim Bakken
Backken2015
No. 25
Position:Kicker
Personal information
Born:November 2, 1940 (age 78)
Madison, Wisconsin
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:200 lb (91 kg)
Career information
High school:Madison (WI) West
College:Wisconsin
NFL Draft:1962 / Round: 7 / Pick: 88
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Field goals:282/447 (.631)
Extra points:534/553 (.966)
Points scored:1380
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

See also

External links

References

  1. ^ UWBadgers.com, "Athletics Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Friday", "Archived copy". Archived from the original on June 22, 2011. Retrieved August 29, 2012.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) . Retrieved November 21, 2010.
  2. ^ BigTen.org, "Football Trophy Names", http://www.bigten.org/sports/m-footbl/spec-rel/121310aaa.html. Retrieved December 14, 2010.
1961 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1961 Wisconsin Badgers football team represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1961 Big Ten Conference football season.

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1967 New Orleans Saints season

The 1967 New Orleans Saints season was the inaugural season for the franchise. The team went 3–11, finishing in last place in the four-team NFL Eastern Conference Capitol Division.

1968 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1968 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League (NFL). They failed to improve on their previous output of 6–7–1, winning only two games. Eagles fans expected to get O.J. Simpson if they went winless. They finished 2–12, but the Buffalo Bills went 1–12–1 and got Simpson with the first pick. Before they won their twelfth game, the Eagles were on target for a winless season at 0–11. They were the first team in the NFL proper to lose eleven consecutive games in one season since their own 1936 season, though in the AFL the 1962 Oakland Raiders lost their first thirteen games.

One of the most infamous incidents in Philadelphia sports history came at halftime of the final game of the dismal 1968 season, when the Eagles were on their way to losing to the Minnesota Vikings. The Eagles had planned a Christmas pageant for halftime of the December 15 game, but the condition of the field was too poor. Instead, the team asked a fan dressed as Santa Claus to run onto the field to celebrate with a group of cheerleaders. The fans, in no mood to celebrate, loudly booed and threw snowballs at “Santa Claus.”

1968 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1968 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 49th season the team was in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved on their previous output of 6–7–1, winning nine games. Despite the improvement, they failed to qualify for the playoffs for the 20th consecutive season.

1973 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1973 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's eighth year in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved on their previous season’s output of 7–7 and achieved their best record until 1980, but failed to reach a maiden playoff berth due to an unexpected home loss to a Cardinals team that had won only one of its last ten and was playing an unknown quarterback, Gary Keithley. Keithley completed only ten of thirty-two passes, but the Cardinals’ rushing game was completely unexpected and along with six field goals from Jim Bakken destroyed the Falcons after they had led 10-0.A highlight for the 1973 Falcons was defeating the Vikings when that team was 9–0 and looking at emulating the previous season‘s Dolphins’ perfect season. Despite the Falcons’ success between 2008 and 2012, this was the last time the Falcons defeated the last unbeaten NFL team until they defeated the 14-0 Carolina Panthers in week 16 of the 2015 season.

1973 Green Bay Packers season

The 1973 Green Bay Packers season was their 55th season overall and their 53rd season in the National Football League. The defending division champions posted a 5–7–2 record under third-year head coach Dan Devine, earning them a third-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1973 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1973 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise’s 41st in the National Football League. Although they improved upon their 2–11–1 record of the previous season, they failed to complete a winning record for the seventh consecutive season and failed to reach the playoffs for the thirteenth straight year.

1974 New York Giants season

The 1974 New York Giants season was the franchise's 50th season in the National Football League. The Giants finished in last place in the National Football Conference East Division with a 2–12 record, the team's worst since 1966.The Giants’ home venue in 1974 was the Yale Bowl in New Haven, Connecticut, and they were winless at home in seven games. They won only one of twelve games at the Yale Bowl in 1973 and 1974. The Giants played at Shea Stadium in Queens in 1975 and opened Giants Stadium in New Jersey in October 1976.

1974 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1974 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 55th year with the National Football League and the 15th season in St. Louis. The Cardinals scored 285 points while the defense gave up 218 points, en route to the NFC East Championship.The 10–4 Cardinals qualified for the postseason for the first time since 1948 when the franchise was based in Chicago. It was the Cardinals first winning season since 1970 when the Cardinals went 8–5–1. Although the Cardinals and the Washington Redskins finished with identical 10–4 records, the Cardinals won the NFC East title, because of their two victories over Washington that season.

The Cardinals won their first seven games, and were at least tied for first place from Week One to the end of the regular season.

1975 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1975 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise’s 43rd in the National Football League. 1975 was the third season under head coach Mike McCormack, but became the Eagles’ ninth consecutive season without a winning record. The Eagles also missed the playoffs for a fifteenth consecutive season, a franchise record. Following the season, McCormack was fired and replaced for 1976 by Dick Vermeil.

1975 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1975 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 56th year with the National Football League and the 16th season in St. Louis. The club scored 356 points while the defense gave up 276 points. The club appeared in the playoffs for the second consecutive year, by winning the NFC East with a record of eleven wins and three losses. They were not again to appear in the playoffs during a full NFL season until 1998, by which time they had left St. Louis.

The team was nicknamed the “Cardiac Cards”, because eight of their games were decided in the final minute of play; the Cardinals went 7–1 in these games.

1976 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1976. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1976.

1976 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1976 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 57th season the franchise was in the league. The team failed to improve on their previous output of 11–3, instead regressing by one win. This was the first time in three seasons the team did not qualify for the playoffs.

1977 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1977 Dallas Cowboys season was their 18th in the NFL. The club appeared twice on Monday Night Football. Tony Dorsett rushed for 1,007 yards and became the second member of the Cowboys (first since 1973) to have a 1,000-yard rushing season. During the season, the club scored 345 points, which ranked first in the NFC, while the defense only gave up 212 points. The Cowboys made it to their fourth Super Bowl and beat the Denver Broncos to capture their second Super Bowl Championship. They were the first team from the NFC East Division to win two Super Bowls. Their 15-2 record (.882, including the postseason) remains the highest single season winning percentage in team history.

1977 Miami Dolphins season

The 1977 Miami Dolphins season was the team's 12th as a member of the National Football League (NFL). The Dolphins improved upon their previous season's output of 6–8, winning ten games. After suffering their first losing season under Coach Don Shula, the Dolphins bounced back to finish 10-4. Bob Griese had a stellar year, despite being forced to wear thick eyeglasses due to a problem with his contacts. Griese, whose season was highlighted by a six touchdown game in St. Louis against the Cardinals, was named Player of the year by the Maxwell Club of Philadelphia. Despite the improvement, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the third straight season.

1977 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1977 St. Louis Cardinals season was the franchise’s 56th year with the National Football League and the 17th season in St. Louis. This was the final season in St Louis for head coach Don Coryell who began coaching the San Diego Chargers the following year.

1978 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1978 Dallas Cowboys season was their 19th in the NFL. For the third consecutive season, the Cowboys finished in first place in the NFC East. The Cowboys scored 384 points, which ranked first in the NFC, while the defense only gave up 208 points. Twice, the Cowboys appeared on Monday Night Football.

The Cowboys became the first franchise to appear in five Super Bowls. With their loss to Pittsburgh in Super Bowl XIII, they also became the first team to lose a Super Bowl after having won it the previous year.

National Football League 1970s All-Decade Team

This is a list of all National Football League (NFL) players who had outstanding performances throughout the 1970s and have been compiled onto this fantasy group. The team was selected by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The squad consists of first- and second-team offensive, defensive and special teams units, as well as a first- and second-team head coaches.

Punter Ray Guy was the leading vote-getter for the 1970s All-Decade Team, receiving 24 of a possible 25 votes. O.J. Simpson and Lynn Swann were next with 22 and 21 votes, respectively. Linebacker Jack Ham and Tight end Dave Casper each received 20 votes. Next were Defensive end Jack Youngblood and Joe Greene who each had 18 votes.

Holdovers from the National Football League 1960s All-Decade Team were Bob Lilly, Dick Butkus, Merlin Olsen, Larry Wilson, Jim Bakken, and Willie Brown.

Regular season statistics
Season Team (record) G FGM FGA % <20 20-29 30-39 40-49 50+ LNG BLK XPM XPA % PTS
1962 St. Louis Cardinals (4–9–1) 8 0 1 0.0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 0 0 0 0 0.0 0
1963 St. Louis Cardinals (9–5) 14 11 21 52.4 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 45 0 44 44 100.0 77
1964 St. Louis Cardinals (9–3–2) 14 25 38 65.8 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 51 0 40 40 100.0 115
1965 St. Louis Cardinals (5–9) 14 21 31 67.7 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 45 0 33 33 100.0 96
1966 St. Louis Cardinals (8–5–1) 14 23 40 57.5 8–8 7–8 4–8 4–12 0–4 47 0 27 28 96.4 96
1967 St. Louis Cardinals (6–7–1) 14 27 39 69.2 8–8 8–9 8–11 3–10 0–1 47 0 36 36 100.0 117
1968 St. Louis Cardinals (9–4–1) 14 15 24 62.5 2–2 7–7 3–6 3–8 0–1 47 0 40 40 100.0 85
1969 St. Louis Cardinals (4–9–1) 14 12 24 50.0 2–2 4–8 3–4 3–7 0–3 46 0 38 40 95.0 74
1970 St. Louis Cardinals (8–5–1) 14 20 32 62.5 4–4 3–6 7–7 6–11 0–4 49 0 37 38 97.4 97
1971 St. Louis Cardinals (4–9–1) 14 21 32 65.6 5–5 8–13 5–6 3–8 0–0 45 0 24 24 100.0 87
1972 St. Louis Cardinals (4–9–1) 14 14 22 63.6 4–5 2–5 2–3 6–9 0–0 49 0 19 21 90.5 61
1973 St. Louis Cardinals (4–9–1) 14 23 32 71.9 4–4 6–7 10–12 3–8 0–1 46 0 31 31 100.0 100
1974 St. Louis Cardinals (10–4) 14 13 22 59.1 0–0 2–3 5–9 6–10 0–0 47 0 30 36 83.3 69
1975 St. Louis Cardinals (11–3) 14 19 24 79.2 0–0 10–11 5–7 4–6 0–0 48 0 40 41 97.6 97
1976 St. Louis Cardinals (10–4) 14 20 27 74.1 0–0 10–11 6–8 4–8 0–0 43 0 33 35 94.3 93
1977 St. Louis Cardinals (7–7) 14 7 16 43.8 0–0 2–2 3–5 2–8 0–1 49 0 35 36 97.2 56
1978 St. Louis Cardinals (6–10) 16 11 22 50.0 0–0 4–5 4–7 3–10 0–0 45 0 27 30 90.0 60
Career (17 seasons) 234 282 447 63.1 37–38 73–95 65–93 50–115 0–15 51 0 534 553 96.6 1380

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