Jigger Statz

Arnold John "Jigger" Statz (October 20, 1897 – March 16, 1988) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who also had a lengthy minor league career. He is one of only eight players known to have amassed at least 4,000 combined hits in the major and minor leagues.

Jigger Statz
1922 Jigger Statz.jpeg
Outfielder
Born: October 20, 1897
Waukegan, Illinois
Died: March 16, 1988 (aged 90)
Corona del Mar, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 30, 1919, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1928, for the Brooklyn Robins
MLB statistics
Batting average.285
Home runs17
Runs batted in215
Teams

Early life

Statz attended Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he moved from Illinois along with his parents at an early age. He played baseball for two years at Holy Cross before enlisting in the U. S. Navy during World War I. Though he signed with the Giants in 1919, Statz continued his studies at Holy Cross and graduated with his class in 1921.[1]

Major league career

Jigger Statz played in the major leagues during eight seasons from 1919 to 1928 for the Chicago Cubs, New York Giants, Boston Red Sox, and Brooklyn Robins. His best season was in 1923 with the Cubs, when he played in all 154 games, compiling a .319 batting average, with 10 home runs and 70 runs batted in.

Minor league career

Statz played 18 minor league seasons, all of them for the Los Angeles Angels of the Pacific Coast League. In an era when many players had lengthy minor league careers, Jigger Statz's statistics surpassed those of his contemporaries, e.g. a grand total of 4,093 major and minor league hits, and a total number of games played which was exceeded only by Pete Rose.[1]

Statz had a distinguished career in the Pacific Coast League. He holds the PCL records for games played (2790), hits (3356), doubles (597), triples (136), and runs scored (1996). His career PCL batting average was .315.[2] The year after his playing career ended, he was a member of the first group of players elected to the Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame.[3]

Total hits

Jigger Statz, New York NL (baseball) LCCN2014710550 (cropped)
Statz taking batting practice in 1920.

Statz is one of only eight players (along with Pete Rose, Ty Cobb, Julio Franco, Hank Aaron, Derek Jeter, Ichiro Suzuki, and Stan Musial) known to have amassed at least 4,000 combined hits in the major leagues and minor leagues.[4] (Jake Beckley and Sam Crawford may also have hit 4,000, but data for some of their minor league seasons are missing.[5])

Post–playing career

Statz managed for five years in the minor leagues. He was the Angels' player-manager during 1940–1942, and managed the Visalia Cubs of the California League in 1948–1949.

Jigger Statz played himself in the 1929 Paramount film, Fast Company, and in 1952 served as a technical advisor for The Winning Team, a fictionalized Warner Bros. biography of Grover Cleveland Alexander which starred Ronald Reagan.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b Jigger Statz at the SABR Bio Project, by Bill Nowlin, retrieved 2011-11-01
  2. ^ Jigger Statz at BR Bullpen, accessed 2011-11-01
  3. ^ Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame at BR Bullpen, accessed 2011-11-01
  4. ^ The incomparable Ichiro's 4,000 hits, Jim Caple, ESPN.com, accessed 2013-08-23
  5. ^ Chasing 4000, Devon Young, Baseballmusings.com, accessed 2013-08-23
  6. ^ Jigger Statz on IMDb

External links

1919 New York Giants season

The 1919 New York Giants season was the franchise's 37th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 87-53 record, 9 games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

1920 Boston Red Sox season

The 1920 Boston Red Sox season was the 20th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 72 wins and 81 losses.

1920 New York Giants season

The 1920 New York Giants season was the franchise's 38th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 86-68 record, 7 games behind the Brooklyn Robins.

1922 Chicago Cubs season

The 1922 Chicago Cubs season was the 51st season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 47th in the National League and the 7th at Wrigley Field (then known as "Cubs Park"). The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 80–74.

1923 Chicago Cubs season

The 1923 Chicago Cubs season was the 52nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 48th in the National League and the 8th at Wrigley Field (then known as "Cubs Park"). The Cubs finished fourth in the National League with a record of 83–71.

1924 Chicago Cubs season

The 1924 Chicago Cubs season was the 53rd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 49th in the National League and the 9th at Wrigley Field (then known as "Cubs Park"). The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 81–72.

1925 Chicago Cubs season

The 1925 Chicago Cubs season was the 54th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 50th in the National League and the 10th at Wrigley Field (then known as "Cubs Park"). The Cubs finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 68–86.

1927 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1927 Brooklyn Robins had another bad year. They tied a National League record on May 21 by using five pitchers in the eighth inning.

1928 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1928 Brooklyn Robins finished in 6th place, despite pitcher Dazzy Vance leading the league in strikeouts for a seventh straight season as well as posting a career best 2.09 ERA.

1940 Chicago Cubs season

The 1940 Chicago Cubs season was the 69th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 65th in the National League and the 25th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 75–79.

1941 Chicago Cubs season

The 1941 Chicago Cubs season was the 70th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 66th in the National League and the 26th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished sixth in the National League with a record of 70–84.

1942 Chicago Cubs season

The 1942 Chicago Cubs season was the 71st season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 67th in the National League and the 27th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished sixth in the National League with a record of 68–86.

1948 Chicago Cubs season

The 1948 Chicago Cubs season was the 77th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 73rd in the National League and the 33rd at Wrigley Field, as well as the first of many seasons to be broadcast on television on WGN-TV while keeping its separate WBKB telecasts. The Cubs finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 64–90.

1949 Chicago Cubs season

The 1949 Chicago Cubs season was the 78th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 74th in the National League and the 34th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 61–93.

Jigger (nickname)

As a nickname, Jigger may refer to:

Edwin Harlan (1886–1939), American football and baseball player, coach and attorney

Albert Jigger Johnson (1871–1935), American logging foreman

John Johnson, the second two-time Indianapolis 500-winning riding mechanic (1931 and 1937)

Darach O'Connor (born 1995), Irish Gaelic footballer

Gerard Phalen (born 1934), former Canadian senator, educator and union leader

Jacob Siegel (fl. 1900–1910), American gunman turned professional gambler

Leon Sirois (born 1935), American former race car driver

Jigger Statz (1897–1988), American Major League Baseball player

Giannis Vardinogiannis (born 1962), Greek billionaire shipping magnate

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as a center fielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field – the baseball fielding position between left field and right field. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the center fielder is assigned the number 8.

Tris Speaker is the all-time leader in errors committed as a center fielder with 226 career. Ty Cobb (202) is second all-time and the only other center fielder to commit over 200 career errors.

List of Pacific Coast League records

The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a Minor League Baseball league operating at the Triple-A level. It was founded in 1903 as circuit of six teams on the West Coast of the United States. Today, it is composed of 16 teams that stretch from California to Middle Tennessee. This list documents the PCL's top players and teams in particular statistical areas. These records are correct as of the end of the 2016 season.

The PCL was one of the premier regional baseball leagues in the first half of the 20th century. Although it was never recognized as a true major league, its quality of play was considered very high. In 1958, with the arrival of major league teams on the west coast and the availability of televised major league games, the PCL's modern era began with each team signing Player Development Contracts to become farm teams of major league clubs.

The mild climate of the West Coast, especially California, allowed the league to play longer seasons, sometimes starting in late February and ending as late as the beginning of December. Teams regularly played between 170 and 200 games in a season until the late 1950s. This abundance of games and playing time is one reason that a number of league records were set during the first half of the 20th century.

Pacific Coast League Most Valuable Player Award

The Pacific Coast League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual award given to the best player in minor league baseball's Pacific Coast League. Managers from the 16 Pacific Coast League teams vote for the winner of the award, which is then combined with 16 votes from various general managers, broadcasters, and media representatives around the league to determine a winner. The award was formerly voted upon by writers from The Sporting News.In 1927, Lefty O'Doul won the first ever Pacific Coast League MVP Award. No player was selected from 1928 to 1931. In 1932, the award returned, going to Jigger Statz. For six seasons in the 1970s (1973, 1975–79) the award was suspended. In 1948, Charlie Graham donated a plaque, which was named in his honor, to be awarded annually to the league's MVP.First basemen, with 22 winners, have won the most among infielders, followed by third basemen (7), second basemen (3), and shortstops (3). Eight players who won the award were catchers. Twenty-eight outfielders have won the MVP Award, the most of any position. A total of 11 pitchers have won the MVP Award, all of them being right-handed. The last pitcher to win was Steve Mintz in 1996. The Pacific Coast League now has a Pitcher of the Year Award, which was established in 2001. Steve Bilko has the record for most MVP Award wins with three (1955–57). Sandy Alomar, Jr., and Les Scarsella have both won the MVP Award twice. Scarsella first won the award in 1944 as a first baseman and then won his second in 1946 as an outfielder.

Two Pacific Coast League MVP Award winners, Joe DiMaggio and Tony Pérez, have gone on to be inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Seven players each from the Los Angeles Angels and the Las Vegas Stars/51s have been selected for the MVP Award, more than any other teams in the league, followed by the Albuquerque Dukes and San Diego Padres (6); the Hollywood Stars (5); the Oakland Oaks, Sacramento River Cats, San Francisco Seals, and Spokane Indians (4); the Calgary Cannons, Reno Aces, Salt Lake City Stingers/Bees, Seattle Rainiers, and Tucson Toros/Sidewinders (3); the Albuquerque Isotopes, Edmonton Trappers, Fresno Grizzlies, Iowa Cubs, Oklahoma City 89ers/Oklahoma RedHawks, Phoenix Firebirds, and Sacramento Solons (2); and the El Paso Chihuahuas, Eugene Emeralds, Indianapolis Indians, Omaha Royals, Tacoma Giants, and the Tulsa Oilers (1).

Thirteen players from the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers Major League Baseball (MLB) organization have won the MVP Award, more than any other, followed by the Chicago Cubs organization (9); the San Diego Padres organization (5); the Arizona Diamondbacks, Houston Astros, Oakland Athletics, and San Francisco Giants organizations (4); the Chicago White Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates, Seattle Mariners, and St. Louis Cardinals organizations (3); the Anaheim/California Angels, Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies, Texas Rangers, and Toronto Blue Jays organizations (2); and the Cleveland Indians, Colorado Rockies, Kansas City Royals, and New York Yankees organizations (1). Thirteen MVP Award winners were not members of any MLB organization.

Paul Carpenter (baseball)

Paul Calvin Carpenter (August 12, 1894, at Granville, Ohio – March 14, 1968, at Newark, Ohio) was a minor league baseball player. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1916 and was the designated replacement for Jigger Statz, playing for the Los Angeles Angels in the Pacific Coast League, in the 1940 season. He was the uncle of Woody English, who also played professional baseball.

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