Jeu provençal

Jeu provençal ('game of Provence'; also known as boule lyonnaise, "boules of Lyon") is a French form of boules.

In Italy, the sport bocce volo, which is played with bronze balls, follows a similar set of rules.[1]

Tournoi de la Pentecôte
Jeu provençal being played in Lyon

History

The current version of the game developed during the 18th century around the area of Lyon.

  • The Fédération Lyonnaise et Régionale was formed in 1906.
  • About the same time, in 1907, the sport of pétanque split off to become its own sport.
  • It led to the formation of Fédération Nationale des Boules in 1933.
  • That became the Fédération Française de Boules in 1942.

Rules

The rules are similar to the game of pétanque except that:

  • A jeu provençal court is about twice the size of a pétanque court.
  • In jeu provençal, the normal practice is to take a short run-up to the throw. (In pétanque, the feet are fixed in one spot while throwing.)

These differences reflect the reason that pétanque was invented – to create a sport that was accessible to a disabled player in a wheelchair.

In addition:

  • in jeu provençal (as in bocce), each player has four boules when playing as singles (in pétanque, each has three).

Grounds and equipment

Under official rules, the court must measure 27.5 metres (30.1 yd) in length and between 2.5 to 4 metres (2.7 to 4.4 yd) in width, with a clear play area of 12.5 metres (13.7 yd) and 7.5 metres (8.2 yd) at each end (one end is the Landing zone, and the other is where the players stand and throw).

When the jack is thrown, it must land at least 12.5 metres (13.7 yd) away from the player.

Boules

The boules vary in size, weight, and composition, usually to accommodate the player's comfort, but tend to be made of bronze (with the jack being wooden) and are usually 90 to 110 millimetres (3.5 to 4.3 in) in diameter and weigh 900 to 1,200 grams (2.0 to 2.6 lb).[2] They must be centrally balanced.

References

  1. ^ Petanque.org - Italian Games (accessed 18 May 2008)
  2. ^ www.BocceVolo.com - Official Rules - Chapter 1 - Materials

External links

Annot

Annot is a commune in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region of southeastern France.

The inhabitants of the commune are known as Annotains or AnnotainesThe commune has been awarded one flower by the National Council of Towns and Villages in Bloom in the Competition of cities and villages in Bloom.

Bocce

Bocce (), sometimes anglicized as bocci or boccie, is a ball sport belonging to the boules family, closely related to British bowls and French pétanque, with a common ancestry from ancient games played in the Roman Empire. Developed into its present form in Italy (where it is called bocce, the plural of the Italian word boccia which means 'bowl' in the sport sense), it is played around Europe and also in overseas areas that have received Italian migrants, including Australia, North America, and South America (where it is known as bochas, or bolas criollas ('Criollo balls') in Venezuela, bocha in Brazil). Bocce was initially played among the Italian migrants but has slowly become more popular with their descendants and the wider community.

The sport is also very popular on the eastern side of the Adriatic, especially in Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, and Bosnia and Herzegovina, where the sport is known in Serbo-Croatian as boćanje ('playing boće') or balote (colloquially also bućanje). In Slovenia the sport is known as balinanje or colloquially 'playing boče', or bale (from Italian bocce and Venetian bałe, meaning 'balls').

Bocce volo

Bocce volo ("flying boules"), or boule lyonnaise ("Lyonnais boules"), is a boules-type game.

In bocce volo, the balls are thrown overhand (palm down) and are metal. In standard bocce, the wooden or plastic balls are tossed underhand (palm up) and rolled.

Volo, as it is called for short by the Italians, derives its name from the Italian verb volare meaning 'to fly', and refers to the technique of throwing a ball through the air in an attempt to knock away an opponent's ball.

Bocce volo is similar to pétanque in that the ball is thrown rather than rolled or bowled. It is similar to traditional bocce (and different from pétanque) in that the ball is delivered with a run-up. A volo players' run-up is athletic, even theatrical, as in jeu provençal.

Boules

Boules (French pronunciation: ​[bul]) is a collective name for a wide range of games similar to bowls and bocce (In French: jeu or jeux, in Italian: gioco or giochi) in which the objective is to throw or roll heavy balls (called boules in France, and bocce in Italy) as close as possible to a small target ball, called the jack in English.

Boules-type games are traditional and popular in many European countries and are also popular in some former French colonies in Africa and Asia. Boules games are often played in open spaces (town squares and parks) in villages and towns. Dedicated playing areas for boules-type games are typically large, level, rectangular courts made of flattened earth, gravel, or crushed stone, enclosed in wooden rails or back boards.

Confédération Mondiale des Sports de Boules

The Confédération Mondiale des Sports de Boules (CMSB) is the international organization, recognized by the International Olympic Committee, which governs the sport of the boules.

Kī-o-rahi

Kī-o-rahi is a ball sport played in New Zealand with a small round ball called a 'kī'. It is a fast-paced game incorporating skills similar to rugby union, netball and touch. Two teams of seven players play on a circular field divided into zones, and score points by touching the 'pou' (boundary markers) and hitting a central 'tupu' or target. The game is played with varying rules (e.g. number of people, size of field, tag ripping rules etc.) depending on the geographic area it is played in. A process called Tatu, before the game, determines which rules the two teams will use.

In 2005 kī-o-rahi was chosen to represent New Zealand by global fast-food chain McDonald's as part of its 'Passport to Play' programme to teach physical play activities in 31,000 American schools.

The programme will give instruction in 15 ethnic games to seven million primary school children.The New Zealand kī-o-rahi representative organisation, Kī-o-Rahi Akotanga Iho, formed with men's and women's national teams, completed a 14 match tour of Europe in September and October 2010. The men's team included 22-test All Black veteran Wayne Shelford who led the team to a 57–10 test win against Kī-o-Rahi Dieppe Organisation, the French Kī-o-Rahi federation.

Shelford's kī-o-rahi test jersey made him the first kī-o-rahi/rugby double international for NZ. The women's team coached by Andrea Cameron (Head of PE at Tikipunga High School) also won by 33–0. These were the first historic test matches between NZ and France.

List of international sports federations

This is a list of international sports federations, each of which serves as a non-governmental governing body for a given sport and administers its sport at a world level, most often crafting rules, promoting the sport to prospective spectators and fans, developing prospective players, and organizing world or continental championships. Some international sports federations like the International Swimming Federation and the International Skating Union may oversee multiple activities referred to in common parlance as separate sports: FINA, for example governs swimming, diving, synchronised swimming, and water polo as separate 'disciplines' within the single 'sport' of Aquatics.

International sports federations form an integral part of the Olympic and Paralympic movements. Each Olympic sport is represented by its respective international sport federation, which in turn help administer their respective events during the Games. For a sport to become an Olympic sport, its respective international sport federation must be recognized by the International Olympic Committee.Likewise, an international sports federation must be recognized by the International Paralympic Committee for its sport to become a paralympic sport, though in the latter case, several Paralympic Sports are governed by a dedicated committee of the International Paralympic Committee itself, under the World Para branding, for example track and field athletics for disabled athletes is governed by the IPC itself, under the name World Para Athletics. Other Paralympic sports are governed within the structure of the able-bodied equivalent: for example, the UCI governs both able-bodied and paralympic cycling.

List of sports

The following is a list of sports/games, divided by category.

According to the World Sports Encyclopedia (2003), there are 8,000 indigenous sports and sporting games.

List of sports governing bodies in Wales

The governing bodies of sports in Wales perform an organisational, regulatory or sanctioning function at a national level in Wales, some tracing their history to the 19th Century. Many cooperate with similar bodies from other countries to agree rule changes for their sport. Most implement decisions made by the international bodies to which they belong. Some, such as the Welsh Sports Association, cover a range of sports. Most of the governing bodies involved in competitive sports select, organise and manage individuals or teams to represent their country at international events or fixtures against other countries.

Sport Wales recognise over fifty governing bodies of sports in Wales, which represent their sports.

Provence

Provence (, US: ; French: [pʁɔvɑ̃s]; Provençal: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm, pronounced [pʀuˈvɛnsɔ]) is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône to the west to the Italian border to the east, and is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It largely corresponds with the modern administrative region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur and includes the departments of Var, Bouches-du-Rhône, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, as well as parts of Alpes-Maritimes and Vaucluse. The largest city of the region is Marseille.

The Romans made the region the first Roman province beyond the Alps and called it Provincia Romana, which evolved into the present name. Until 1481 it was ruled by the Counts of Provence from their capital in Aix-en-Provence, then became a province of the Kings of France. While it has been part of France for more than five hundred years, it still retains a distinct cultural and linguistic identity, particularly in the interior of the region.

Provençal

Provençal may refer to:

Of Provence, a region of France

Provençal dialect, a dialect of the Occitan language, spoken in the southeast of France

Provençal, meaning the whole Occitan language

Franco-Provençal language, a distinct Romance language, which should not be confused with the Occitan language or with the Provençal dialect of the Occitan language

Provencal cuisine

Provencal wine

Provencal, Louisiana, a village in the United States

Provencal, an alternative name for the Italian wine grape Dolcetto

Pétanque

Pétanque (French pronunciation: ​[petɑ̃k]; Occitan: petanca [peˈtaŋkɔ]) is a sport that falls into the category of boules sports, along with raffa, bocce, boule lyonnaise, lawn bowls and crown green bowling. All of these sports share something in common, in that players or teams play their boules/balls towards a target ball.

In Pétanque the objective is to score points by having boules closer to the target than your opponent after all boules have been thrown. This is achieved by projecting boules closer to the target, called a cochonnet, or by hitting the opponents' boules away from the target, while standing inside a circle with both feet on the ground.

The game is normally played on hard dirt or gravel. It can be played in public areas in parks, or in dedicated facilities called boulodromes.

The current form of the game originated in 1907 or 1910 in La Ciotat, in Provence, France. The French name pétanque (borrowed into English, with or without the acute accent) comes from petanca in the Provençal dialect of the Occitan language, deriving from the expression pès tancats [ˈpɛs taŋˈkats], meaning 'feet fixed' or 'feet planted' (on the ground).

Pétanque World Championships

The Pétanque World Championships are international pétanque competitions organized by the International Federation of Petanque and Provencal game; F.I.P.J.P. (Federation Internationale de Pétanque et Jeux Provençaux).

Quidditch (sport)

Quidditch is a sport of two teams of seven players each mounted on broomsticks played on a hockey rink-sized pitch. It is based on a fictional game of the same name invented by author J. K. Rowling, which is featured in the Harry Potter series of novels and related media.[3] The game is also sometimes referred to as muggle quidditch to distinguish it from the fictional game, which involves magical elements such as flying broomsticks and enchanted balls. In the Harry Potter universe, a "muggle" is a person without the power to use magic.

The pitch is rectangular with rounded corners 55 meters (60 yards) by 33 meters (36 yards) with three hoops of varying heights at either end.[4] The sport was created in 2005 and is therefore still quite young. However, quidditch is played around the world and actively growing.[5] The ultimate goal is to have more points than the other team by the time the snitch, a tennis ball inside a long sock hanging from the shorts of an impartial official dressed in yellow, is caught. Rules of the sport are governed by the International Quidditch Association, or the IQA, and events are sanctioned by either the IQA or that nation's governing body.

To score points, chasers or keepers must get the quaffle, a slightly deflated volleyball, into one of three of the opposing hoops which scores the team 10 points.[6] To impede the quaffle from advancing down the pitch, chasers and keepers are able to tackle opposing chasers and keepers at the same time as beaters using their bludgers—dodgeballs—to take out opposing players. Once a player is hit by an opposing bludger, that player must dismount their broom, drop any ball being held, and return to and touch their hoops before being allowed back into play.[7] The game is ended once the snitch is caught by one of the seekers, awarding that team 30 points.[8]A team consists of minimum seven (maximum 21) players, of which six are always on the pitch, those being the three chasers, one keeper, and two beaters. Besides the seeker who is off-pitch, the six players are required to abide by the gender rule, which states that a team may have a maximum of four players who identify as the same gender, making quidditch one of the few sports that not only offers a co-ed environment but an open community to those who do not identify with the gender binary.[10] Matches or games often run about 30 to 40 minutes but tend to be subject to varying lengths of time due to the unpredictable nature of the snitch catch. If the score at the end of the match including the 30 point snitch catch is tied (such that the team that caught the snitch was 30 points behind the other), the game moves to overtime where the snitch is constrained to the pitch's dimensions and the game ends after five minutes or when the snitch is legally caught.

Sport in France

Sports in France play an important role in French society, which is reflected in its popularity among the French people and the nation's strong sporting history. Various types of sports are played and followed in France, the most popular of which is association football.

Stade Clermontois BF

Stade Clermontois Basket Féminin, formerly known as Stade Clermontois Auvergne Basket 63 is a French women's basketball club from Clermont-Ferrand created in 1938, currently playing in 6th tier Regionale Féminine 2. It is the women's basketball section of Stace Clermontois, a sports club also featuring archery, athletics, boxing, canne de combat, fencing, gymnastics, handball, jeu provençal, judo, karate, pétanque, rugby union, savate, swimming, table tennis, tennis, weightlifting, volleyball and wrestling sections.

Stade Clermontois became Clermont's main women's basketball team after Clermont UC's disappearance in 1985. It won the national cup in 1989, and it played the 1994 Ronchetti Cup and the 2006 FIBA Eurocup. In 2009 it withdrew from professional basketball for financial reasons.

Throwing sports

Throwing sports, or throwing games, are physical, human competitions where the outcome is measured by a player's ability to throw an object.

The two primary forms are throwing for distance and throwing at a given target or range. The four most prominent throwing for distance sports are in track and field: shot put, discus, javelin, and the hammer throw. Target-based sports have two main genres: bowling and darts, each of which have a great number of variations.

Welsh Pétanque Association

The Welsh Pétanque Association (Welsh: Cymdeithas Pétanque Cymru) (WPA) (established 2004) is the governing body for the sport of pétanque in Wales. The WPA is affiliated to the Confédération Européenne de Pétanque (CEP) and the Fédération Internationale de Pétanque et Jeu Provençal (FIPJP). It aims to promote the sport's development for all people in Wales. The Welsh Pétanque Association organises competition at national and international level, including League and National Competitions and the Welsh Cup for Clubs—the winning club qualifying for the EuroCup (European Cup for Clubs)—and is responsible for the selection of the Wales national squads, who compete in international events including the Celtic Challenge, European Championships and World Championships.The WPA has 13 registered clubs. The Welsh Pétanque Association is based at Pontyclun, Rhondda Cynon Taf.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.