Jessie Fleming

Jessie Alexandra Fleming (born March 11, 1998) is a Canadian soccer player who plays as a midfielder for the UCLA Bruins and the Canadian national team, having made her senior debut at age 15 years 278 days.

Jessie Fleming
Jessie Fleming
Fleming warming up for a game in 2017
Personal information
Full name Jessie Alexandra Fleming
Date of birth March 11, 1998 (age 21)
Place of birth London, Ontario, Canada
Height 1.64 m (5 ft 4 12 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current team
UCLA Bruins
Number 21
Youth career
Team
London Nor'West SC
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2016– UCLA Bruins 53 (22)
National team
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2013–2014 Canada U-17 12 (4)
2014 Canada U-20 3 (0)
2015 Canada U-23 5 (1)
2013– Canada 66 (8)
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of June 10, 2019[1]

College career

Fleming committed to UCLA in 2014[2] and joined the Bruins in 2016.[3] She played her first game on August 28, less than 10 days after helping Canada win a bronze medal at the Olympics, scoring twice in a 4–3 loss to Florida. Her goalscoring tear continued as she netted 7 goals in her first 6 games as a college player. She appeared in 19 games, making 16 starts, and finished as the leading scorer on the team with 11 goals and 5 assists for a total of 27 points. Fleming was one of just two freshmen to receive All-America honours in 2016, being selected to the NSCAA All-America third team. She was selected the Top Drawer Soccer Freshman of the Year and also earned first-team All-Pac-12 and Pac-12 All-Freshman acclaim.[4]

As a sophomore, Fleming recorded 6 goals, including three game-winners, and provided 8 assists. She earned first-team United Soccer Coaches All-America honours and received first-team All-West Region and All-Pac-12 honours for the second-straight year. After helping UCLA reach the College Cup final and scoring a goal in the championship match, she was selected as a finalist for the Hermann Trophy.[5]

International career

Fleming captained Canada U-17 to a silver medal at the 2013 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship, resulting in qualification to the 2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, where she navigated Canada out of the group of death.[6]

Fleming made her senior debut at age 15 in Brazil on December 15, 2013 at the Torneio Internacional de Brasília tournament, when she entered as a second-half substitute against Chile in a 0–1 defeat and became the second-youngest player to ever play for Canada. She scored her first goal against Scotland on March 4, 2015 in a 2–0 win at the 2015 Cyprus Cup.[7]

Fleming was named as a member of the Canada 2015 World Cup squad.[8] On June 15, 2015, she started Canada's final group stage match of the World Cup against Netherlands in front of 45,420 fans at Olympic Stadium.[9] The match ended 1–1, which was enough for Canada to win Group A.

Fleming was named to Canada's 2016 Summer Olympics squad, which defeated the home team Brazil to win a bronze medal.[10] She had a secondary assist on the winning goal, scored by Christine Sinclair.[10]

Fleming made her 50th appearance on March 7, 2018, scoring her 5th international goal in a 3–0 win over South Korea at the 2018 Algarve Cup.[11]

On May 25, 2019 she was named to the roster for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.[12]

Personal

Both of Flemings' parents are originally from Toronto. She grew up and played soccer in London, Ontario.[1] Jessie attended Ryerson Public School for elementary school where she remained undefeated in cross country throughout her entire elementary school career. Jessie went on to attend London Central Secondary School from grade 9 to grade 10, and H.B. Beal S.S. for grade 12.

In 2013, Fleming won two gold medals at the OFSAA track and field championships in the midget women 1500m and the midget women 3000m. The following year, Fleming won another gold medal in the junior women 3000m. Fleming also played hockey as a child, including in a full-contact boys' league.[13]

Career statistics

International goals

Honours

International

Individual

College

International

References

  1. ^ a b "Jessie Fleming player profile". Canada Soccer Association.
  2. ^ "Canada's Fleming verbally commits to UCLA". Equalizer Soccer. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  3. ^ "UCLA lands Pugh and Fleming in recruiting coup 02/05/2016". SoccerAmerica.
  4. ^ "Fleming Named to MAC Hermann Trophy Watch List". UCLA Athletics.
  5. ^ "Fleming named finalist for MAC Hermann Trophy". UCLA Athletics. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  6. ^ Care, Tony (March 4, 2015). "Jessie Fleming: The next Christine Sinclair?". CBC Sports. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  7. ^ "Fleming, Sinclair score as Canada beats Scotland at Cyprus Cup". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved March 5, 2015.
  8. ^ Dalla Costa, Morris (May 5, 2015). "Top level is just the start for young Jessie Fleming". The London Free Press. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  9. ^ "Netherlands vs. Canada". soccerway. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  10. ^ a b "Fleming Wins Olympic Bronze with Team Canada". Retrieved December 6, 2016.
  11. ^ "Canada defeats Korea Republic 3:0 in final Algarve Cup group stage match". Canada Soccer. Retrieved March 7, 2018.
  12. ^ "Together We Rise: Canada Soccer announces squad for the FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019". Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  13. ^ "Jessie Fleming attributes soccer expertise to track, hockey roots". Retrieved December 6, 2016.
  14. ^ a b c "Jessie Fleming player profile". Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  15. ^ "CWU17 Golden Ball: Jessie Fleming (Canada)". CONCACAF. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  16. ^ "TSG announces CWU17 Best XI". CONCACAF. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  17. ^ "2017 CONCACAF Award Winners Announced". CONCACAF. Retrieved January 25, 2018.
  18. ^ "Concacaf announces the individual awards and Best XI of the CWC". CONCACAF. October 18, 2018. Retrieved November 24, 2018.

External links

2013 CONCACAF Awards

The 2013 CONCACAF Awards were the first year for CONCACAF's awards for the top region football players, coaches and referees of the year. The results were announced on 13 December 2013.

2013 CONCACAF Women's U-17 Championship

The 2013 CONCACAF Under-17 Women's Championship is the fourth edition of the U-17 women's championship in football for the CONCACAF region. The tournament was hosted by Jamaica from 30 October to 9 November 2013. The United States were the defending champions. All matches were played in Montego Bay.The two finalists, alongside hosts Costa Rica, qualify for the 2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Group A

Group A of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup consisted of hosts Canada, China, New Zealand and the Netherlands. Matches were played from 6 to 15 June 2015.

2016 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament

The 2016 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament (also known as the 2016 Women's College Cup) was the 35th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semi-finals and championship game were played at Avaya Stadium in San Jose, California from December 2–4, 2016 while the preceding rounds were played at various sites across the country during November 2016.

2017 CONCACAF Awards

The shortlists for the 2017 CONCACAF Awards were announced on 22 November 2017. The results were announced on 18 and 19 December 2017.

2018 Algarve Cup

The 2018 Algarve Cup was the 25th edition of the Algarve Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held annually in Portugal. It took place from 28 February to 7 March 2018.Because the final between the Netherlands and Sweden was cancelled, the trophy was awarded to both teams.

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship was the 10th edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship (also known as the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying Tournament), the quadrennial international football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. Eight teams played in the tournament, which took place from 4–17 October in the United States.The tournament served as the CONCACAF qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. The top three teams qualified for the World Cup, while the fourth-placed team advanced to a play-off against the third-placed team from the South American confederation, CONMEBOL. It also determined the CONCACAF teams playing at the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima.The United States were the defending champions of the competition. They successfully defended their title as hosts, winning the final 2–0 against Canada for their 8th CONCACAF Women's Championship title.

2018 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament

The 2018 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament (also known as the 2018 Women's College Cup) will be the 37th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game will be played at WakeMed Soccer Park in Cary, North Carolina from November 30 – December 2, 2018 while the preceding rounds will be played at various sites across the country during November 2018.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group E

Group E of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 10 to 20 June 2019. The group consisted of Cameroon, Canada, the Netherlands and New Zealand. The top two teams, the Netherlands and Canada, along with the third-placed team, Cameroon (as one of the four best third-placed teams), advanced to the round of 16.

Canadian U-17 Players of the Year

The Canadian U-17 Players of the Year award celebrated Canada's top-two U-17 footballers in recognition of their achievements with both the national teams and their respective clubs. The two winners were recognized as co-winners of the award. Voting was conducted by Canadian coaches. The award was retired after the 2017 season.

2017: Alphonso Davies & Jordyn Huitema

2016: Alphonso Davies & Deanne Rose

2015: Kadin Chung & Kennedy Faulknor

2014: Ballou Jean-Yves Tabla & Jessie Fleming

2013: Marco Carducci & Sura Yekka

2012: Marco Carducci & Ashley Lawrence

2011: Bryce Alderson & Ashley Lawrence

2010: Bryce Alderson & Diamond Simpson

2009: Russell Teibert & Abigail Raymer

2008: Russell Teibert & Monica Lam-Feist

2007: Olivier Lacoste-Lebuis & Monica Lam-Feist

Canadian U-20 Players of the Year

The Canadian U-20 Players of the Year award celebrated Canada's top-two U-20 footballers in recognition of their achievements with both the national teams and their respective clubs. The two winners were recognized as co-winners of the award. From 2007 to 2017, voting was conducted by Canadian coaches. The award was retired after the 2017 season.

2017: Kris Twardek & Jessie Fleming

2016: Ballou Tabla & Jessie Fleming

2015: Michael Petrasso & Jessie Fleming

2014: Michael Petrasso & Kadeisha Buchanan

2013: Dylan Carreiro & Kadeisha Buchanan

2012: Doneil Henry & Sabrina D'Angelo

2011: Ashtone Morgan & Amelia Pietrangelo

2010: Ethan Gage & Jonelle Filigno

2009: Nana Attakora & Chelsea Stewart

2008: Nana Attakora & Jonelle Filigno

2007: Asmir Begović & Sophie Schmidt

2006: David Edgar & Jodi-Ann Robinson

2005: Ryan Gyaki & Kara Lang

David J. Tweedie (mathematician)

David James Tweedie (1870–1926) was a Scottish mathematician, educated at the University of Edinburgh who became the Headmaster of the Public School, Kilconquhar, Fife.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics

The association football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 20 August in Brazil.In addition to the Olympic host city of Rio de Janeiro, matches were played in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Salvador, São Paulo, and Manaus. All six cities hosted matches during the 2014 World Cup, with the Estádio Olímpico João Havelange in Rio the only Olympic venue not to have been a World Cup venue.Associations affiliated with FIFA might send teams to participate in the tournament. Men's teams were restricted to under-23 players (born on or after 1 January 1993) with a maximum of three overage players allowed, while there were no age restrictions on women's teams. The Games made use of about 400 footballs.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament – Group F

Group F of the women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was played from 3 to 9 August 2016, and included Australia, Canada, Germany and Zimbabwe. The top two teams advanced to the knockout stage, while the third-placed team Australia also advanced because they were among the two best third-placed teams among all three groups.All times are BRT (UTC−3).

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament – Knockout stage

The knockout stage of the women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was played from 12 to 19 August 2016. The top two teams from each group in the group stage and the two best third-placed teams qualified for the knockout stage.All times are local, BRT (UTC−3).

Hailie Mace

Hailie Janae Mace (born March 24, 1997) is an American professional soccer player who plays as a defender for FC Rosengård of the Damallsvenskan. She debuted for the United States women's national soccer team in 2018.

List of Canada women's international soccer players

The Canada women's national soccer team represents the country of Canada in international soccer. It is fielded by the Canada Soccer Association, the governing body of soccer in Canada, and competes as a member of the CONCACAF, which encompasses the countries of North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean region. Canada competed in their first official international football match on July 7, 1986, a 2–0 defeat to the United States national team in Blaine, Minnesota.Canada have competed in numerous competitions, and all players, either as a member of the starting eleven or as a substitute, are listed below. Each player's details include the number of caps earned and goals scored in all international matches, and opponent of their first and last matches played in (a blank in the "last cap" column indicates an active player who has been called up in the last 12 months), ordered alphabetically. All statistics are correct up to and including the match played on June 24, 2019. Players that are still active at the club and/or international level are in bold.

UCLA Bruins women's soccer

The UCLA Bruins women's soccer team is an intercollegiate varsity sports team of the University of California at Los Angeles. The team is a member of the Pac-12 Conference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The team won their first national championship on December 8, 2013 by defeating Florida State 1-0 in overtime.

West Virginia Mountaineers women's soccer

The West Virginia Mountaineers are the intercollegiate women's soccer team representing West Virginia University. The Mountaineers compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) as members of the Big 12 Conference. The first team was fielded in 1996. WVU plays its home games at Dick Dlesk Soccer Stadium in Morgantown, West Virginia.

The women's soccer team at WVU has been coached by Nikki Izzo-Brown since the team launched in 1996.

West Virginia has qualified for the NCAA Tournament each of the last 16 seasons, making the quarterfinal round twice (2007 and 2015).

Key (expand for notes on “international goals” and sorting)
Location Geographic location of the venue where the competition occurred
Sorted by country name first, then by city name
Lineup Start – played entire match
on minute (off player) – substituted on at the minute indicated, and player was substituted off at the same time

off minute (on player) – substituted off at the minute indicated, and player was substituted on at the same time
(c) – captain
Sorted by minutes played

# NumberOfGoals.goalNumber scored by the player in the match (alternate notation to Goal in match)
Min The minute in the match the goal was scored. For list that include caps, blank indicates played in the match but did not score a goal.
Assist/pass The ball was passed by the player, which assisted in scoring the goal. This column depends on the availability and source of this information.
penalty or pk Goal scored on penalty-kick which was awarded due to foul by opponent. (Goals scored in penalty-shoot-out, at the end of a tied match after extra-time, are not included.)
Score The match score after the goal was scored.
Sorted by goal difference, then by goal scored by the player's team
Result The final score.

Sorted by goal difference in the match, then by goal difference in penalty-shoot-out if it is taken, followed by goal scored by the player's team in the match, then by goal scored in the penalty-shoot-out. For matches with identical final scores, match ending in extra-time without penalty-shoot-out is a tougher match, therefore precede matches that ended in regulation

aet The score at the end of extra-time; the match was tied at the end of 90' regulation
pso Penalty-shoot-out score shown in parenthesis; the match was tied at the end of extra-time
Light-purple background colorexhibition or closed door international friendly match
Light-yellow background color – match at an invitational tournament
Light-orange background color – Olympic women's football qualification match
Light-blue background color – FIFA women's world cup qualification match
Orange background color – Olympic women's football tournament
Blue background color – FIFA women's world cup final tournament

NOTE: some keys may not apply for a particular football player


Goal
Date Location Opponent Score Result Competition
1. March 4, 2015 GSP Stadium  Scotland

1–0

2–0

2015 Cyprus Cup
2. February 14, 2016 BBVA Compass Stadium  Trinidad and Tobago

6–0

6–0

CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifier
3. July 20, 2016 Stade Sébastien Charléty  China PR

1–0

1–0

Friendly
4. June 8, 2017 Investors Group Field  Costa Rica

1–0

3–1

Friendly
5. March 5, 2018 Estádio Municipal de Albufeira  South Korea

2–0

3–0

2018 Algarve Cup
6. June 10, 2018 Tim Hortons Field  Germany

2–1

2–3

Friendly
7. October 14, 2018 Toyota Stadium  Panama

3–0

7–0

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship Semi-final
8. March 25, 2019 BMO Field  Mexico

1–0

3–0

Friendly
9. June 15, 2019 Stade des Alpes  New Zealand

1–0

2–0

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group Stage
Canada squads

Languages

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