Jesse Sapolu

Manase Jesse Sapolu (born March 10, 1961) is a former football player in the National Football League. He played both center and offensive guard, and spent his entire pro-football career in a San Francisco 49ers uniform.

Sapolu attended Farrington High School and the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. Standing 6 feet 4 inches, 278 lbs., he was selected by the Oakland Invaders in the 17th round (199th pick overall) of the 1983 USFL draft, and selected by San Francisco 49ers in the 11th round (289th pick overall) of the 1983 NFL Draft. He signed with the San Francisco 49ers on July 10, 1983.

Sapolu is one of six 49ers to own four Super Bowl championship rings (1984, 1988, 1989, and 1994), and the only one of those to earn a ring with the '94 team rather than their first title in 1981.[1] He earned Pro Bowl honors in 1993 and 1994.

Since retiring in 1997, Sapolu has lived in Costa Mesa, California,[2] and remains active in the community as well with the San Francisco 49ers alumni.

Sapolu has been an integral part in establishing the Polynesian Pro Football Hall of Fame, of which he is a co-founder. He now runs Men In The Trenches (MITT) in California.[3]

Jesse Sapolu
refer to caption
Sapolu in June 2009
No. 61
Position:Center / Guard
Personal information
Born:March 10, 1961 (age 58)
Apia, Samoa
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:278 lb (126 kg)
Career information
High school:Honolulu (HI) Farrington
College:Hawaii
NFL Draft:1983 / Round: 11 / Pick: 289
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:182
Games started:154
Fumble recoveries:1
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/rings
  2. ^ Virgen, Steve (February 1, 2013). "Sapolu remains passionate, humble". Daily Pilot. Orange County, California.
  3. ^ http://sapolumeninthetrenches.com/index.html

Further reading

  • Sapolu, Jesse (2012). I Gave My Heart to San Francisco. Newport Beach: Celebrity Publishing. ISBN 9780983705963.

External links

1983 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1983 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 34th year with the National Football League. The team attempted to improve on its 3-6 record from 1982. The 49ers would start the season with a loss to the Philadelphia Eagles 22-17. However, the 49ers would continue to impress, as they throttled the Vikings the next week 48-17 and then the Cardinals the following week 42-27. They would end the first half of the season 6-2 before splitting their last eight games to finish the season 10-6 and clinching the NFC West. In the playoffs, the 49ers would come back to beat the Lions 24-23 after Joe Montana found Freddie Solomon in the end zone with 1:23 remaining. However, in the NFC Championship game, they were not able to outlast the top-seeded Redskins, as they lost 24-21 after Washington took the lead on a field goal.

1987 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1987 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 38th year with the National Football League. The 49ers won the division for the second consecutive season, and ended the season as the top seed in the NFC playoffs. The season ended with an upset loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs.

1990 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1990 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 41st season in the National Football League and their 45th overall. the team entered the 1990 season heavily favoured to win their third consecutive Super Bowl. The season was highlighted by their defeat of the New York Giants on Monday Night Football in Week 13. Throughout the season, the 49ers and the Giants were the two best teams in the NFL. The two teams would meet again in the NFC Championship Game.

This was the season the 49ers debut the stitched up authentic name and numbers on jerseys.

Between 1988 and 1990, the 49ers set a league record with 18 consecutive road victories. Jerry Rice had a career year by becoming the fourth receiver in the history of American football to have at least 100 receptions in one season. The 49ers won their fifth consecutive NFC West Division Title. Dating back to 1989, the 49ers completed a fifteen-game unbeaten streak in the regular season (5 victories in the last 5 games of 1989 and 10 victories in the first ten games of 1990).

The 49ers were the closest team in NFL history to "three peat" in the Super Bowl, losing in the final seconds on a field goal by the Giants in the NFC Championship Game. The season ended on quite a haunting note, because the Giants' Leonard Marshall made a devastating hit on 49er quarterback Joe Montana, knocking him out of the game. Subsequent to this, Giant nose tackle Erik Howard fought through a double-team block by 49er center Jesse Sapolu and 49er guard Guy McIntyre to force 49er running back Roger Craig to fumble by getting his helmet on the football with only a few minutes left while the 49ers were driving to run out the game clock. Erik Howard dropped to one knee and managed to turn his shoulders perpendicular to the line of scrimmage in an effort to neutralize the double-team block. 49er guard Guy McIntyre released from the double-team block on Erik Howard in order to attempt a block on onrushing Giant inside linebacker Pepper Johnson allowing Erik Howard to knife through the protection and lay a hit on 49er running back Roger Craig. The ball was recovered by Giant outside linebacker Lawrence Taylor after he beat a block at the line of scrimmage by 49er tight end Brent Jones and a subsequent block by 49er fullback Tom Rathman to position himself just behind where Roger Craig was located along the line of scrimmage to catch the football after Giant nose tackle Erik Howard's hit forced it out of Craig's grasp. The Giants took over possession and began driving to kick the game-winning field goal. They ended up winning 15–13. The words of announcer Pat Summerall, "There will be no three-peat!" still haunt 49ers fans.

Following the 1990 season, the 49ers left team stalwarts Roger Craig and Ronnie Lott unprotected and let them go to the Los Angeles Raiders via Plan B free agency. Joe Montana would remain on the 49ers' roster for the next two seasons, but would never start another game for the 49ers.

1991 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1991 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 42nd year with the National Football League. The franchise did not qualify for the postseason for the first time since the strike-shortened 1982 season. Joe Montana would miss the entire season with an elbow injury, paving the way for Steve Young to take over as the team's starting quarterback.

In Week 17, the 49ers found themselves not controlling their destiny. The Atlanta Falcons had already swept the 49ers in 2 very close games in the regular season, and therefore held the tiebreaker in the wild card. The New Orleans Saints had a 10–5 record entering the week, and defeated the Phoenix Cardinals, winning the division.

1993 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1993 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive season and for the fifth time in six seasons. For the first time since 1978, Joe Montana was not on their active roster; specifically, the 49ers had traded him away to the Chiefs in April.

1994 Pro Bowl

The 1994 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1993 season. The game was played on February 6, 1994, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final Score was NFC 17, AFC 3. Andre Rison of the Atlanta Falcons was the game's MVP. This was also Joe Montana's last Pro Bowl appearance (coincidentally, the coaches for this game were from both teams that Montana played for in his career: Kansas City's Marty Schottenheimer and San Francisco's George Seifert). The referee was Gordon McCarter.

The game was tied 3-3 at halftime on field goals by Norm Johnson of the Atlanta Falcons and Gary Anderson of the Pittsburgh Steelers. The NFC scored late in the 3rd quarter on a 4-yard touchdown run by Los Angeles Ram rookie, Jerome Bettis. The NFC scored again in the 4th quarter on a touchdown pass from Bobby Hebert (Falcons) to Cris Carter (Minnesota Vikings) to provide the final margin.

1994 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1994 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 49th season in the National Football League, and was highlighted by a victory in Super Bowl XXIX. The championship made San Francisco the first team to win five Super Bowls. After losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the previous two conference championship games, the 49ers made significant acquisitions in the 1994 free agent market. This included the signing of two-sport star Deion Sanders and Cowboys linebacker Ken Norton, Jr.. Sanders had a major impact on the team's success, winning the NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award and recording six interceptions.

Quarterback Steve Young had his best NFL season and won his second MVP award. Steve Young set what was, at the time, the NFL record for highest passer rating in a season – 112.8. Cold Hard Football Facts states that Young's 1994 season is the second greatest passing season in NFL history.For the third consecutive season, the 49ers met the Cowboys in the NFC Championship Game. From the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s, the AFC was widely regarded as the NFL's inferior conference. Thus, this meeting between the NFC's perennial powerhouses was dubbed by many as "the real Super Bowl." The contest was one of the highest rated non-Super Bowl games in NFL history.

The 49ers would go on to defeat the Chargers in Super Bowl XXIX. Young was named the game's MVP with a record six touchdown passes.

1995 Pro Bowl

The 1995 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 1994 season. The game was played on February 5, 1995, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final Score was AFC 41, NFC 13. This was the AFC's largest margin of victory since the AFL-NFL merger. Rookie Marshall Faulk of the Indianapolis Colts rushed for a Pro Bowl record 180 yards and was the game's MVP. Chris Warren added 127 yards rushing as the AFC posted records for rushing yards (400) and total yards (552). Both Warren and Faulk broke the Pro Bowl rushing record, formerly held by O.J. Simpson.The coaches were Dallas’ Barry Switzer and Bill Cowher of the Pittsburgh Steelers. The game was viewed by 49,121 at Aloha Stadium. The referee was Larry Nemmers.

1997 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1997 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 48th year with the National Football League. The franchise appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the fifth time in the 1990s. This season marked their last appearance in the NFC title game until the 2011 season. The team's playoff run was ended by the Green Bay Packers for the third straight year.

49ers–Giants rivalry

The 49ers–Giants rivalry is a National Football (NFL) rivalry between the San Francisco 49ers and the New York Giants. It is one of the great inter-division rivalry games in the NFL. The two teams do not play every year; instead, they play once every three years due to the NFL's rotating division schedules, or if the two teams finish in the same place in their respective divisions, they would play the ensuing season. Since 1982, the 49ers and Giants have met eight times in the postseason (including two NFC Championship Games), the most times two teams have met in the playoffs in the NFL since that time.

Both teams have won 16 regular season games and 4 postseason games against each other for a total of 20 wins each. However, San Francisco leads the overall series 18–11 since 1980.

Erik Howard

Erik Matthew Howard (born November 12, 1964 in Pittsfield, Massachusetts) is a former professional American football defensive tackle who played eleven seasons in the National Football League. He played nine seasons with the Giants, and was a member of the 1986 Giants team that won Super Bowl XXI and the 1990 Giants team that won Super Bowl XXV.

In the 1990 NFC Championship game against the San Francisco 49ers, Howard came up with one of the biggest plays of the 1990 season and arguably the biggest play in Giants history. With just under three minutes left in the game, the Giants trailed 13-12, and the 49ers had the game nearly wrapped up when Howard fought through a double-team block by 49ers' Guard Guy McIntyre and Center Jesse Sapolu to force running back Roger Craig to fumble the football after getting his helmet on the ball. Teammate Lawrence Taylor fought through two blocks by 49ers' TE Brent Jones and RB Tom Rathman to get to the spot along the line of scrimmage where Craig was located to recover the fumble as the ball was forced out of Craig's grasp. The Giants went on to win the game on Matt Bahr's field goal, kicked with 4 seconds remaining on the game clock. The Giant went on to win Super Bowl XXV over the Buffalo Bills seven days later.

Howard signed with the New York Jets as a free agent in 1994, and played with them for two years before deciding to retire. He currently resides in Marshall, Texas, with his wife Jennifer Howard and three children Jackson Howard, Katelynn Howard, and Keaton Howard.

Farrington High School

Governor Wallace Rider Farrington High School is a public grades 9–12 high school located in the Kalihi district of Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi.

The school is named after the late Wallace Rider Farrington, the sixth governor of the Territory of Hawaiʻi, who served from 1921 to 1929.

Farrington is an urban high school that serves an ethnically diverse community of mostly lower socio-economic families and a smaller number of middle-class families.

FHS is the home of the Governors and is part of the Hawaii State Department of Education.

Farrington provides career pathways for its students through several integrated vocational programs, including a health academy that was nationally recognized for excellence. In addition, Farrington offers students opportunities to participate and excel in both visual and performing arts.

During World War II, the U.S. Army used the school as a hospital.

Farrington High School was honored as a 2017 Model School by the International Center for Leadership in Education.

Hawaii Rainbow Warriors football

The Hawaii Rainbow Warriors football team represents the University of Hawaii at Manoa in NCAA Division I FBS college football. On November 27, 2015, Nick Rolovich was hired as the new head football coach at the University of Hawaii replacing Norm Chow. It was part of the Western Athletic Conference until July 2012, when the team joined the Mountain West Conference.

From 2000 until July 1, 2013, the football team was renamed to simply Warriors, until a 2013 decision to standardize all of the school's athletic team names took effect, and the team was once again known as the Rainbow Warriors.The Hawaiʻi Warriors were the third team from a non automatic qualifier conference to play in a BCS bowl game. They played Georgia in the Sugar Bowl on January 1, 2008 in New Orleans.

Hawaii Sports Hall of Fame

The Hawaii Sports Hall of Fame is a sports hall of fame and museum in the U.S. state of Hawaii. According to the hall's official website, it serves as the "state museum for sports history in the islands," and "is best described as an educational repository created to enshrine athletes, pioneers and contributors of Hawai'i's rich sports history." The organization was founded in 1997 and a selection committee meets once a year in December. The flagship exhibition for the hall is located in the Bishop Museum in Honolulu.

The 2016 class, inducted in May 2016, included water polo player Brandon Brooks, decathlete Bryan Clay, soccer player Brian Ching, and brothers Ma'ake Kemoeatu and Chris Kemoeatu for American football.

List of Hawaii Warriors in the NFL Draft

The Hawaii Warriors football team, representing the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, has had 69 American football players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the first draft in 1936. The highest that a Warrior has ever been drafted is 19th overall, which occurred when Ashley Lelie was drafted in 2002. The St. Louis Rams have drafted the most Warriors with six.Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL Draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).Before the merger agreement in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues, along with the subsequent drafting of the same player in each draft. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.The most Warriors selected in a single NFL Draft is five, in 2007. Of the Warriors selected in the NFL Draft, two have been selected to a Pro Bowl: Jason Elam and Jesse Sapolu. Nine have been a member of a Super Bowl winning team, including Sapolu and Elam. One Warrior, Jim Mills, is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

Polynesian Football Hall of Fame

The Polynesian Football Hall of Fame is a hall of fame that honors the greatest players, coaches, and contributors of Polynesian descent in the sport of American football. It was established in 2013 by former National Football League (NFL) players Jesse Sapolu and Maa Tanuvasa. Board members include Troy Polamalu, Via Sikahema, June Jones, and Reno Mahe. The hall is located at the Polynesian Cultural Center in Oahu, Hawaii.

Riki Ellison

Riki Morgan Ellison (born August 15, 1960) is a former U.S. college and professional linebacker, who played ten seasons in the National Football League (NFL), and went by the name Riki Gray while in college at USC as an All-Pac-10 player in 1982. He is the first New Zealander to play in the NFL.

Super Bowl XXIX

Super Bowl XXIX was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion San Diego Chargers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion San Francisco 49ers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1994 season. This is the only Super Bowl in history to be played between two teams from the same state. The 49ers defeated the Chargers by the score of 49–26, becoming the first team to win five Super Bowl championships. The game was played on January 29, 1995 at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida (now part of the suburb of Miami Gardens, which became a separate city in 2003).

This game is regarded as 49ers quarterback Steve Young's final leap out of the shadow of his predecessor, Joe Montana, who had won four Super Bowls with the 49ers (in 1982, 1985, 1989, and 1990), two with Young as the backup quarterback. With Young at the helm, and a defense consisting of several veteran free agents who joined the team during the previous offseason, San Francisco finished the regular season with a league-best 13–3 record, and led the league in total points scored (505). The Chargers, on the other hand, were regarded as a "Cinderella" team, and advanced to their first Super Bowl after posting an 11–5 regular-season record and overcoming halftime deficits in both of their playoff wins.

This was the first Super Bowl in which both teams scored in all four quarters. The combined aggregate score of 75 points and the ten total touchdowns both remain Super Bowl records. Still, the 49ers controlled most of the game, with Young completing touchdown passes in each of the 49ers' first two drives. The Chargers were able to cut the deficit late in the first quarter, 14–7, on a 13-play, 78-yard drive, but could not slow down San Francisco afterwards. Young was named the Super Bowl MVP, throwing a Super Bowl-record six touchdown passes, and completing 24 out of 36 passes for 325 yards.

Despite the predicted blowout (18½ points is the largest margin a team has been favored by in a Super Bowl), the fact that San Diego did not have as much national appeal nor a relatively large core fan base, and two teams from California playing, which could have significantly diminished interest along the East Coast, the telecast of the game on ABC still had a Nielsen rating of 41.3.

Tim Krumrie

Timothy Alan Krumrie (born May 20, 1960) is a former American football nose tackle who played his entire National Football League career for the Cincinnati Bengals, from 1983 through 1994.

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