Jesse Barnes

Jesse Lawrence Barnes (August 26, 1892 – September 9, 1961) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball.

Barnes began his major league career in 1914 with the Boston Braves. In 1917 he led the National League with 21 losses. On October 2, 1917, he became the only NL pitcher to walk two times in one inning.

In 1918, Barnes was traded to the New York Giants. He had three very good years with the Giants. On the last day of the 1919 season, he won his National League-leading 25th victory, 6–1, over Lee Meadows and the Philadelphia Phillies at Polo Grounds. The game was played at a feverish pace and lasted a mere 51 minutes, a major league record that still stands as the shortest nine-inning game ever played.[1]

In 1920 he had 20 wins, following with 15 wins in 1921 and two victories in the 1921 World Series against the New York Yankees. Then, in 1922 he hurled a no-hitter against the Phillies.

He returned to the Boston Braves in 1923, playing for them three years before joining the Brooklyn Robins from 1926 through 1927. For the second time, he led the league in losses (20) in 1924.

His younger brother, Virgil, also pitched in the majors, and both were teammates with the Giants from 1919 to 1923.

On June 26, 1924, Jesse opposed Virgil in the first pitching matchup of brothers in major league history. Virgil did not have a decision while Jesse was credited with the loss as the Giants defeated the Braves‚ 8-1. The Barnes brothers will match up four more times during their careers‚ the first, including three days from its date.[2]

The baseball author and analyst Bill James is also a distant relative of them.[3]

Jesse Barnes
Jesse-barnes
Pitcher
Born: April 26, 1892
Perkins, Oklahoma
Died: September 9, 1961 (aged 69)
Santa Rosa, New Mexico
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 30, 1915, for the Boston Braves
Last MLB appearance
August 20, 1927, for the Brooklyn Robins
MLB statistics
Win–loss record152–150
Earned run average3.22
Strikeouts653
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Chronology – 1919 Baseball Library
  2. ^ Chronology – Jesse Barnes Archived 2015-01-17 at the Wayback Machine Baseball Library
  3. ^ Google Books – The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, Page 95

External links

Preceded by
Charlie Robertson
No-hitter pitcher
May 7, 1922
Succeeded by
Sad Sam Jones
1892 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1892 throughout the world.

1915 Boston Braves season

The 1915 Boston Braves season was the 45th season of the franchise. The Braves finished second in the National League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses, seven games behind the National League champion Philadelphia Phillies. The 1915 season was notable for the opening of Braves Field on August 13, the last of the National League's "jewel box" stadiums to be built. (Weeghman Park in Chicago, while opened in 1914, would not be occupied by the Cubs until the next season.) Prior to the opening of Braves Field, the Braves had played in Fenway Park for the first half of the 1915 season and the last 27 games of the 1914 season, having left their only previous home, South End Grounds, on August 11, 1914.

In the final game of the season, a 15–8 loss to the New York Giants, Joe Shannon made his final Major League appearance, and Red Shannon made his first Major League appearance. The two were twins, marking the first of three times that twins played on the same team (along with Eddie and Johnny O'Brien and Jose and Ozzie Canseco).

1916 Boston Braves season

The 1916 Boston Braves season was the 46th season of the franchise. was a season in American baseball. The team finished third in the National League with a record of 89–63, four games behind the Brooklyn Robins.

Before the 1916 season, the Braves were sold to a syndicate headed by former Harvard University football coach Percy Haughton.

1917 Boston Braves season

The 1917 Boston Braves season was the 47th season of the franchise. The Braves finished sixth in the National League with a record of 72 wins and 81 losses.

1918 New York Giants season

The 1918 New York Giants season was the franchise's 36th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 71-53 record, 10½ games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1919 New York Giants season

The 1919 New York Giants season was the franchise's 37th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 87-53 record, 9 games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

1920 New York Giants season

The 1920 New York Giants season was the franchise's 38th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with an 86-68 record, 7 games behind the Brooklyn Robins.

1921 New York Giants season

The 1921 New York Giants season was the franchise's 39th season, which culminated in the Giants defeating the New York Yankees in the World Series.

1922 New York Giants season

The 1922 New York Giants season was the franchise's 40th season. The team finished in first place in the National League with a 93-61 record. The Giants won their second consecutive World Series, defeating the New York Yankees in five games (Game 2 was a 3-3 tie) without a loss.

1923 Boston Braves season

The 1923 Boston Braves season was the 53rd season of the franchise.

1923 New York Giants season

The 1923 New York Giants season was the franchise's 41st season. The Giants won the National League pennant with a 95-58 record. The team went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1923 World Series, four games to two.

1924 Boston Braves season

The 1924 Boston Braves season was the 54th season of the franchise. The Braves finished eighth in the National League with a record of 53 wins and 100 losses.

1925 Boston Braves season

The 1925 Boston Braves season was the 55th season of the franchise.

1926 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1926 Brooklyn Robins season was the 18th and final season for long–time team star Zack Wheat.

1927 Brooklyn Robins season

The 1927 Brooklyn Robins had another bad year. They tied a National League record on May 21 by using five pitchers in the eighth inning.

List of Boston and Milwaukee Braves Opening Day starting pitchers

The Braves are a Major League Baseball team that was originally based in Boston. They moved to Milwaukee in 1953 before moving to their current home, Atlanta in 1966. They played in the National League since its formation in 1876. At various points in the history in Boston, they were known as the Beaneaters, the Doves, the Rustlers and the Bees. During the 20th century until their move to Milwaukee, they played their home games primarily at two home ball parks – South End Grounds until 1914, and Braves Field from 1915 through 1952. They also played some home games at Fenway Park in 1914 and 1915, including Opening Day of 1915. Their home ball park in Milwaukee was County Stadium. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day.The Braves used 40 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 80 National League seasons they played prior to moving to Atlanta. The Braves won 46 of those games against 42 losses in those Opening Day starts. They also played two tie games.Warren Spahn had the most Opening Day starts for the Boston and Milwaukee Braves with ten between 1952 and 1964. Kid Nichols made six Opening Day starts between 1893 and 1901. Jim Whitney (1881–1885) and John Clarkson (1888–1892) each had five Opening Day starts. Tommy Bond (1877–1880), Vic Willis (1900–1904), Dick Rudolph (1915–1917, 1919), Al Javery (1942–1945) and Johnny Sain (1946–1949) each made four Opening Day starts. Irv Young (1906–1908), Bob Smith (1927–1929) and Ed Brandt (1932, 1934, 1935) each had three such starts. Other pitchers with multiple Opening Day starts for the Boston and Milwaukee Braves were Charles Radbourn, Jack Stivetts, Hub Perdue, Joe Oeschger, Joe Genewich, Danny MacFayden and Lew Burdette.

Prior to moving to Atlanta, the Braves played in the World Series four times. The played in the World Series as the Boston Braves in 1914 and 1948, and as the Milwaukee Braves in 1957 and 1959. They won the World Series in 1914 and 1957. Their Opening Day starting pitchers in World Series years were Lefty Tyler in 1914, Sain in 1948, and Spahn in 1957 and 1958. They lost their Opening Day game in 1914, 1948 and 1958, and won in 1957. In addition, the franchise won the National League championship eight times during the 19th century, prior to the existence of the modern World Series. Nichols was the team's Opening Day starting pitcher in three of those season, Clarkson and Bond in two of those seasons each, and Whitney was the Opening Day starting pitcher in one such season.

Jesse Barnes made an Opening Day start for the Braves against the New York Giants in 1925, after having made an Opening Day start for the Giants against the Braves in 1920. Spahn is the only pitcher to make an Opening Day start for both the Boston Braves and the Milwaukee Braves. Tony Cloninger, who made the last Opening Day start for the Milwaukee Braves in 1965 and the first for the Atlanta Braves in 1966, is the only pitcher to make an Opening Day start for both the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves.

List of New York Giants Opening Day starting pitchers

The New York Giants were a Major League Baseball team that played in Manhattan, New York until moving to San Francisco in 1958. From 1883 until their move to San Francisco, they played their home games at the Polo Grounds. They played in the National League. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Giants used 33 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 75 seasons they played in New York. The Giants won 39 of those games against 35 losses in those Opening Day starts. They also played one tie game.Carl Hubbell had the most Opening Day starts for the New York Giants with six between 1929 and 1942. Mickey Welch, Amos Rusie and Larry Jansen each had five Opening Day starts for the team. Christy Mathewson, Red Ames, Jeff Tesreau and Bill Voiselle all had four Opening Day starts apiece for the Giants. Ed Doheny and Johnny Antonelli each had three Opening Day starts for the New York Giants and Antonelli also had an Opening Day start for the San Francisco Giants in 1959, giving him a total of four Opening Day starts for the franchise. Antonelli is the only player to have an Opening Day start for both the New York and San Francisco Giants.Other pitchers who had multiple Opening Day starts for the New York Giants were Hal Schumacher with three such starts, and Joe McGinnity, Rube Marquard, Jesse Barnes, Art Nehf, Virgil Barnes, Bill Walker and Sal Maglie with two apiece. Seven Hall of Fame pitchers made Opening Day starts for the New York Giants — Welch, Tim Keefe, Rusie, Mathewson, McGinnity, Marquard and Hubbell.

The New York Giants won the modern World Series five times, in 1905, 1921, 1922, 1933 and 1954. Their Opening Day starting pitchers in those years were Joe McGinnity in 1905, [Phil Douglas (baseball)|Phil Douglas]] in 1921, Art Nehf in 1922, Carl Hubbell in 1933 and Sal Maglie in 1954. In 1904, the Giants won the National League championship but no World Series was played. Christy Mathewson was the Giants' Opening Day starting pitcher that season. The Giants also won the 19th century World Series twice, in 1888 and 1889. Cannonball Titcomb and Mickey Welch were the Giants Opening Day starting pitchers in 1888 and 1889, respectively.

Jesse and Virgil Barnes, who each made two Opening Day starts for the New York Giants, were brothers.

List of San Francisco Giants no-hitters

The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball franchise based in San Francisco, California. They play in the National League West division. Also known in their early years as the "New York Gothams" (1883–84) and "New York Giants" (1885–1957), pitchers for the Giants have thrown 17 no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings", although one or more batters "may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference." No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that one team in Major League Baseball has still never had a pitcher accomplish the feat, and teams may go decades without recording one. A perfect game, a special subcategory of no-hitter, was finally thrown by Matt Cain on June 13, 2012. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game." Previously, this feat came closest on July 4, 1908 when Hooks Wiltse was hit by a pitch with two outs in the ninth and a scoreless tie. The plate umpire, Cy Rigler, claimed he should have called the previous pitch strike three, that would have ended the inning with a perfection. Wiltse would go on to retire all three in the tenth to end the game after the Giants scored a run in the top of the tenth.

Amos Rusie threw the first no-hitter in Giants history on July 31, 1891; the most recent no-hitter was thrown by Chris Heston on June 9, 2015. Five left-handed pitchers have thrown no-hitters in franchise history. The other ten pitchers were right-handers, including the most recent no-hitter author, Heston. Tim Lincecum and Hall of Famer Christy Mathewson are the only pitchers to throw more than one no-hitter in a Giants uniform. Ten no-hitters were thrown at home and seven on the road. The Giants threw one in April, two in May, five in June, five in July, one in August, and three in September. The longest interval between no-hitters was between the games pitched by Hubbell and Juan Marichal, encompassing 34 years, 1 month, and 7 days from May 8, 1929 till June 15, 1963. Conversely, the shortest interval between no-hitters was between the two games pitched by Lincecum, a period of 347 days. The Giants have no-hit the Philadelphia Phillies and San Diego Padres the most, doing so three times each—Wiltse in 1908; Jeff Tesreau in 1912; Jesse Barnes in 1922; Jonathan Sánchez in 2009; and Tim Lincecum in 2013 and 2014. Every Giants no-hitter has been a shutout (which is likely, but not a given, considering baserunners can reach, advance, and score by methods other than hits). The most baserunners allowed in a no-hitter was five, which occurred in Lincecum's first no-hitter. Of the 17 no-hitters, four have been won by a score of 1–0, more common than any other result. Those 1–0 no-hitters were attained by Christy Mathewson in 1905, Wiltse in 1908, Juan Marichal in 1963, and Gaylord Perry in 1968. The largest margin of victory in a Giants no-hitter was an 11–0 win by Carl Hubbell in 1929. Matt Cain is tied with Sandy Koufax for the most strikeouts in a perfect no-hitter with 14.The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out… [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. 16 different umpires presided over each of the franchise's 17 no-hitters.

The manager is another integral part of any no-hitter. The tasks of the manager include determining the starting rotation, the batting order and defensive lineup in every game, and how long a pitcher stays in the game. There have been eight different managers in the franchise's 17 no-hitters.

Oakley Hall (band)

Oakley Hall is an American folk rock band based in Brooklyn, New York.

The group was founded in 2002 and is named for Oakley Hall, an American novelist. The group's songs combine elements of rock, bluegrass, and old-time music, prominently featuring the male-female vocal harmonies of lead vocalists Patrick Sullivan and Rachel Cox. Rather than imitating the style of commercial country or bluegrass, the group's melodies more closely recall old American folk songs and ballads, though often supported by a driving rock beat. In addition to the typical guitars, bass guitar, and drums, the group also features an electrified violin, an electric guitar tuned like a five-string banjo, and a lap steel guitar.

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