Jerry Tubbs

Gerald J. Tubbs (January 23, 1935 – June 13, 2012) was an American football linebacker who played for ten seasons in the National Football League from 1957 to 1966, mainly for the Dallas Cowboys. He was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960 NFL Expansion Draft. After his retirement he stayed with the Cowboys as an assistant coach for 22 years. He played college football at the University of Oklahoma. In 1996, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Jerry Tubbs
No. 53, 50
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:January 23, 1935
Throckmorton County, Texas
Died:June 13, 2012 (aged 77)
Dallas, Texas
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:221 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school:Breckenridge (TX)
College:Oklahoma
NFL Draft:1957 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:119
Games started:81
Fumble recoveries:11
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school career

Tubbs was an honor graduate student and played center at Breckenridge High School. The teams were coached by Cooper Robbins (1951) and Joe Kerbel (1952), who would go on to the college ranks. Tubbs lost only three games during his high school career. In 1971, he was inducted into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame. Since 2008, the Breckenridge Buckaroos open the football season playing the "Jerry Tubbs Kickoff Classic".

College career

Tubbs played three varsity years at the University of Oklahoma, and the Sooners won all 31 games in that period. In 1954, when fullback Billy Pricer was injured, Tubbs had to replace him playing against University of Texas, the first time he had ever played in the backfield. In the remaining games of that season, he averaged 6.1 yards per carry. Head coach Bud Wilkinson moved him to center in 1955, and this became his signature position. He also played linebacker and in a victory over Texas in 1955, he intercepted three passes. In 1956, he was unanimous All-America center and was named Lineman of the Year by three agencies.

During his three varsity years, Oklahoma's record was 10-0, 11-0, 10-0. His 31 wins were part of that legendary 47-game winning streak and two national titles from 1954-56. The 1954 team was ranked third nationally in the Associated Press and United Press polls. The 1955 and 1956 teams were national champions. In those years Oklahoma played in only one bowl game, where the 1955 team beat Maryland University 20-6 in the Orange Bowl.

Tubbs finished fourth in the 1956 Heisman Trophy voting (very high for a lineman), behind his third place teammate, Tommy McDonald, and winner Paul Hornung of Notre Dame University. He graduated from Oklahoma with a degree in economics and was also a 1956 Academic All-America.

In 1996, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and in 1999 he was inducted into the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame.

Professional career

Chicago Cardinals

He was drafted by the Chicago Cardinals in the first round of the 1957 NFL Draft — 10th overall. Suddenly, he found himself on a perennial loser, playing out of position as an outside linebacker. He was eventually benched, then traded to the San Francisco 49ers after the seventh game of the 1958 season.

San Francisco 49ers

The following year (1959), the San Francisco 49ers moved him into the middle linebacker position, where he became a starter. After the 1959 season, Tubbs planned to retire, so the 49ers left him off their list of players who were exempt from the 1960 NFL Expansion Draft.

Dallas Cowboys

Tubbs was acquired by the Dallas Cowboys in 1960 NFL Expansion Draft. As it turned out, he would spend the next 29 years in Dallas — as a player, player-coach and full-time assistant coach. In the 4th game of the 1960 season, Tubbs became the first player in franchise history to start at the middle linebacker position on a regular basis, finishing with 149 tackles (48 solo).

Tubbs was an impact player on those early Cowboys teams and also rated among the top middle linebackers in the NFL. He had quickness, toughness and an unbeatable motor. In 1962, he was one of the first Cowboys players voted to the Pro Bowl, along with: QB Eddie LeBaron; DT Bob Lilly; RB Don Perkins; and CB Don Bishop.

He became a player-coach in 1965. In 1966 he retired and was working for the Dallas Federal Savings and Loan Association, but was lured back by Tom Landry to play behind Lee Roy Jordan for one more year. He played just the first three games of the season, until he suffered a back injury.

The following year (1967), Landry sensing that the Cowboys had a real chance at a championship, wanted to have Tubbs as insurance in the event Lee Roy Jordan should be injured. He came back again, but didn't play a single down while serving as a player-coach, hence he was on the roster and in uniform for the 1967 Ice Bowl championship game against the Packers.

Personal life

When he finally retired as a player at the end of the 1967 season, he became Cowboys linebackers coach for 21 years. He coached in five Super Bowls, winning two of them. He died on June 13, 2012 at the age of 77.[1]

References

  1. ^ Trotter, Jake (2012-06-15). "Ex-Sooner Jerry Tubbs dies at 77". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2014-07-23.

External links

1955 All-Big Seven Conference football team

The 1955 All-Big Seven Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Seven Conference teams for the 1955 college football season. The selectors for the 1955 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press (UP). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UP are designated in bold.

1956 All-Big Seven Conference football team

The 1956 All-Big Seven Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Seven Conference teams for the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. The selectors for the 1956 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press (UP). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UP are designated in bold.

1956 College Football All-America Team

The 1956 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1956. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1956 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the International News Service (INS), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (6) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

1956 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1956 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. It was the 62nd season of play for the Sooners and they repeated as consensus national champions. They were led by hall of fame head coach Bud Wilkinson, in his tenth season. On the field, the Sooners were led on offense by quarterback Jim Harris, and played their home games at Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma.

After another undefeated season, Oklahoma was first in both final polls in early December. Their winning streak was up to forty games, but they did not play in a bowl game due to the Big Seven's no-repeat rule; runner-up Colorado was invited to and won the Orange Bowl.

1956 Orange Bowl

The 1956 Orange Bowl was a college football bowl game between the Oklahoma Sooners and the Maryland Terrapins. It was played on January 2, because New Year's Day was a Sunday.

1960 NFL expansion draft

The 1960 NFL expansion draft was the first National Football League (NFL) draft in which a new expansion team, named the Dallas Rangers, selected its initial players. The NFL awarded Dallas, Texas a franchise to compete for revenue with Lamar Hunt's Dallas Texans of the upstart American Football League. The Dallas expansion franchise was approved too late for it to participate in the 1960 NFL draft which had been held on November 30, 1959. Dallas is the only NFL expansion team to not have had the benefit of a college draft in its first year.So that the Rangers (Cowboys) could become competitive with existing teams, the league gave them the opportunity to select current players from existing teams. That selection was provided by the expansion draft, held on March 13, 1960. In this draft, the Rangers chose 36 players from the existing 12 teams. The NFL also assigned the rights to 1960 NFL draft picks Don Meredith (who had been drafted by the Chicago Bears) and Don Perkins (drafted by the Baltimore Colts) to the Cowboys for a couple of future draft picks.22 players made the active roster that season. 11 players played only one year with Dallas. Eight players (including Jack Patera, who was injured early in the 1961 season) played in 1960 and 1961. The three remaining players from the draft started for several years, including: Bob Fry, Tackle, 1960–64; Jerry Tubbs, Linebacker, 1960–66; and Frank Clarke, Wide Receiver, 1960–67.On March 19, 1960, the Rangers renamed themselves the Cowboys.

1962 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1962 Dallas Cowboys season was their third in the league. The team finished with a record of 5 wins, 8 losses, and 1 tie, placing them 5th in the NFL's Eastern Conference.

1966 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1966 Dallas Cowboys season was the seventh for the franchise in the National Football League. The Cowboys finished the regular season at 10–3–1, their first winning record as a franchise and first Eastern Conference title. They hosted the NFL Championship Game at the Cotton Bowl, but lost to the defending champion Green Bay Packers, who went on to win the first Super Bowl two weeks later.

Aaron Kyle

Aaron Douglas Kyle (born April 6, 1954) is a former American Football cornerback in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Denver Broncos. He played college football at the University of Wyoming and was drafted in the first round of the 1976 NFL Draft.

Andy Frederick

Andrew Brian Frederick (born July 25, 1954) is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, and Chicago Bears. He played college football at the University of New Mexico.

Bill Gregory

William Penn Gregory, Jr. (born December 14, 1949) is a former American football defensive lineman in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys and Seattle Seahawks. He played college football at the University of Wisconsin.

Billy Joe DuPree

Billy Joe DuPree (born March 7, 1950) is a former professional American football tight end in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Michigan State University.

Breckenridge, Texas

Breckenridge is a city in Stephens County, Texas, United States. The population was 5,780 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Stephens County. The mayor is Jim McKay.

Breckenridge was a stop on the since defunct Wichita Falls and Southern Railroad, one of the properties of Frank Kell and Joseph A. Kemp of Wichita Falls, Texas. The line was thereafter operated until 1969 by the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad.Former Texas State Representative Carl Isett of Lubbock (District 84) was born in Breckenridge in 1957.

Dallas Cowboys legend and Texas High School Football Hall of Fame member Gerald M. "Jerry" Tubbs was an honor graduate student and played center at Breckenridge High School. He was part of two Texas state championship football teams in 1951 and 1952. He played in three high school All-Star games and was a unanimous Texas All-State selection in 1952. In 1971, Tubbs was inducted into the Texas High School Football Hall of Fame. Since 2008, the Breckenridge Buckaroos open the football season playing the "Jerry Tubbs Kickoff Classic".

Don Bishop

Donald William Bishop (July 1, 1934 – November 13, 1998) was an American football cornerback in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers and Chicago Bears. He played college football at Los Angeles City College.

Guy Brown

Guy Brown, III (born June 1, 1955) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Houston.

Jim Cooper (American football)

James Albert Cooper (born September 28, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Temple University.

John Fitzgerald (center)

John Robert Fitzgerald (born April 16, 1948) is a former American football center in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys from 1971 to 1980, including four Super Bowls. He played college football at Boston College and was drafted in the fourth round of the 1970 NFL Draft.

Ralph Neely

Ralph Eugene Neely (born September 12, 1943) is a former American football offensive tackle who played 13 seasons and 172 games for the Dallas Cowboys from 1965 to 1977.

Tubbs

Tubbs is a surname. Notable people with the surname include::

Alfred L. Tubbs, American businessman

Billy Tubbs, American college basketball coach.

Greg Tubbs, American Major League Baseball player.

Hubert Tubbs, American singer with Tower of Power and as solo act

Irl Tubbs, American college football coach.

James Tubbs, British instrument bow-maker.

Jerry Tubbs, American football linebacker.

Marcus Tubbs, American football defensive tackle.

Matt Tubbs, English footballer.

Pierre Tubbs, British songwriter and music producer.

Ralph Tubbs, British architect.

Steffan Tubbs, American radio host.

Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Member of the US House of Representatives from Ohio

Tony Tubbs, American Boxing Heavyweight champion.

Winfred Tubbs, American football player.

Zac Tubbs, American football offensive tackle.

Jacob "Tubbs" Ellacott, English footballerFictional characters:

A character in The League of Gentlemen (comedy)

Ricardo Tubbs, a character detective in Miami Vice

Calhoun Tubbs a character on the show In Living Color

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