Jerry Fontenot

Jerry Paul Fontenot (born November 21, 1966) is a former American football center who played in the National Football League for the Chicago Bears, New Orleans Saints and Cincinnati Bengals. He attended Texas A&M University.

Fontenot served as an assistant offensive line coach and tight ends coach for the Green Bay Packers from 2006 to 2015.[1] On January 19, 2016, Fontenot was fired.[2]

Jerry Fontenot
No. 62
Position:Center / Long snapper
Personal information
Born:November 21, 1966 (age 52)
Lafayette, Louisiana
Career information
College:Texas A&M
NFL Draft:1989 / Round: 3 / Pick: 65
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:239
Games started:193
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ "Coaches". Packers.com. Retrieved 22 January 2013.
  2. ^ http://www.packers.com/news-and-events/article-press-release/article-1/Packers-announce-coaching-staff-changes/18ff04b5-14bb-4cf6-80c4-9a1b8a15b26c?campaign=sf19212341
1989 Chicago Bears season

The 1989 Chicago Bears season was their 70th regular season completed in the National Football League. The Bears were looking to win the NFC Central for a sixth consecutive season, but instead finished with a 6–10 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1983. The Bears’ offseason moves prior to this season had consequences for years afterward as the pieces from Super Bowl XX’s team slowly began to leave or retire.

1990 Chicago Bears season

The 1990 Chicago Bears season was their 71st regular season and 20th postseason completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears were looking to return to the playoffs after missing them in 1989 and did so, winning their sixth NFC Central Division championship in seven seasons. With the change in playoff structuring that began in 1990, the Bears were not guaranteed a bye week for winning the division and had to play on Wild Card weekend. They defeated the New Orleans Saints in the Wild Card round but were defeated by the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants at Giants Stadium in the Divisional Playoffs. This was also the last division title the Bears would win until 2001.

For the only time in Mike Ditka's tenure as the Bears' head coach, the team played a regular season game in the state of Arizona when they visited the Phoenix Cardinals on October 28. Chicago left Tempe victorious; it was the Bears' first matchup against the Cardinals since Chicago visited the Cardinals in St. Louis six years earlier.

Late in the season, tragedy struck when defensive tackle Fred Washington, the Bears' second-round pick in the 1990 NFL Draft, was killed in a car accident on December 21, 1990.

1991 Chicago Bears season

The 1991 Chicago Bears season was their 72nd regular season and 21st postseason completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears returned to the playoffs for a second consecutive season as one of three NFC Wild Cards, finishing with an 11–5 record and in second place in the NFC Central. They were beaten, however, by the Dallas Cowboys in their first playoff game. This was Mike Ditka's last playoff game as a head coach.

1992 Chicago Bears season

The 1992 Chicago Bears season was their 73rd regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears were looking to get back into the playoffs for a third straight year and improve on their 11–5 record, which was good enough for second place in the NFC Central, and to win their eighth division title in ten years. Although the Bears had a 4–3 record through seven games, they lost eight of their remaining nine (including six consecutively) and finished at 5–11. The Bears' poor record resulted in the termination of Mike Ditka as head coach on January 5, 1993 after eleven seasons. Dave Wannstedt, who was serving as the Dallas Cowboys' defensive coordinator, was hired to take his place. Ditka was fired from coaching the Bears with a 106-62 record, playoff appearances in 7 out of 11 seasons since 1982 and a Super Bowl victory in 1985, with the defense considered the best of all time. He would return as a head coach in the NFL with the New Orleans Saints in 1997.

1993 Chicago Bears season

The 1993 Chicago Bears season was their 74th regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). It was the Bears' first season since 1981 without Mike Ditka as head coach, as he had been fired following the team's 5–11 finish the year before. Under new head coach Dave Wannstedt, the Bears improved their record to 7–9 but again failed to make the playoffs.

1994 Chicago Bears season

The 1994 Chicago Bears season was their 75th regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears matched their 9–7 record under head coach Dave Wannstedt for their first winning season since the end of the 1991 season. The club was one of four teams from the NFC Central to make the playoffs. This was also the NFL's 75th Anniversary so the Bears wore 1920s-era throwback jerseys in a few games. The Bears celebrated their first playoff win since January 6, 1991, with a hard-fought road victory over the NFC Central champion Minnesota Vikings 35–18 before being knocked out by the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers 44–15 at Candlestick Park.

1994 was the last time the Bears made the playoffs during the 1990s as the following seasons would be disastrous. They wouldn't return to postseason contention until 2001.

1995 Chicago Bears season

The 1995 Chicago Bears season was their 76th regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). the Bears matched to a second straight 9–7 record under head coach Dave Wannstedt, but failed to make the playoffs due to a tiebreaker loss to the Atlanta Falcons. The Bears started the 1995 NFL season as one of the hottest teams with a 6–2 record halfway through the season; however, a stunning overtime home loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers 37–34 triggered a three-game losing streak as part of losing five out of their next six games falling to a disappointing 7–7 record, essentially eliminating themselves out of playoff contention.

1996 Chicago Bears season

The 1996 Chicago Bears season was their 77th regular season completed in the National Football League (NFL). They failed to improve on their 9-7 record from 1995 and finished with a 7–9 record under head coach Dave Wannstedt. It was the team's first losing season since 1993 when it was Wannstedt's first season.

1997 New Orleans Saints season

The 1997 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints 31st season.

1998 New Orleans Saints season

The 1998 New Orleans Saints season was the team’s 32nd as a member of the National Football League (NFL).The Saints failed to qualify for the playoffs for the sixth straight year, and after a promising start of 3–0 only equalled their 6–10 record of the previous season. In the process the Saints lost to the 0–7 Carolina Panthers and were to follow this up the following season against the expansion Browns to become the only team since the NFL/AFL merger to lose to the last winless team in successive seasons.

1999 New Orleans Saints season

The 1999 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints' thirty-third NFL season. This was Mike Ditka's third and final season as the Saints' head coach, as he was fired, along with his entire coaching staff and general manager Bill Kuharich, three days after the conclusion of the season.

During 1999, the Saints became the first team to lose to the expansion Cleveland Browns and in the process became the only team since the NFL/AFL merger in 1970 to lose to the last winless team in successive seasons.

2000 New Orleans Saints season

The 2000 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 34th season in the National Football League and the 25th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The Saints were looking to improve on their 3–13 finish from a year earlier under new head coach Jim Haslett. Not only did the Saints do so, but they finished with a 10–6 record to win the NFC West and advanced to the playoffs for the first time since 1992. They also won their first ever playoff game in franchise history by defeating the defending Super Bowl champion St. Louis Rams in the Wild Card round. The Saints went no further, though, as they lost to the Minnesota Vikings in the next round.

This was the only time the Saints made the playoffs under Haslett. For the next four seasons, the Saints fell out of contention. They would not return to the playoffs until 2006.

New wide receiver Joe Horn, quickly emerged as a star, catching 94 passes for 1,340 and 9 touchdowns, and he was selected to the Pro Bowl after the season.

2001 New Orleans Saints season

The 2001 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 35th season in the National Football League and the 26th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. The Saints failed to improve on their 11-5 record from 2000 and finishing at 7-9. Thus missing the playoffs for the first time since 1999; This meant that the team would become the seventeenth consecutive season that the team hosting the Super Bowl would not be playing in it; A feat that has not been achieved as of Super Bowl XIX.

The Saints were outscored 160-52 in their final four games.

After just three seasons with the Saints, running back Ricky Williams was traded to the Miami Dolphins during the 2002 off-season.

2002 New Orleans Saints season

The 2002 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League and the 27th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. They improved upon their previous season's performance of 7–9, winning nine games. Despite the winning season, and ranking third in total offense in 2002, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs. A bright moment during the season for the Saints was sweeping eventual champion Tampa Bay. The 2 wins were almost guaranteed to make New Orleans a playoff team. However, 3 consecutive losses, including one to 1-13 Cincinnati, knocked New Orleans out of playoff contention.

2003 New Orleans Saints season

The 2003 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League and the 28th to host games at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. They failed to improve on their 9-7 record from 2002 and finished with a record of 8–8. This was the season of the River City Relay, a play that has gone down in NFL lore from a week 16 game against the Jacksonville Jaguars. The Saints were 7-7 and needed a victory to keep their postseason hopes alive. The Jaguars held a 20–13 lead with seven seconds left in regulation, and the Saints had possession on their own 25. In a scene evoking memories of The Play, Aaron Brooks passed to Donté Stallworth for 42 yards, Stallworth lateraled to Michael Lewis for 7 yards, Lewis lateraled to Deuce McAllister for 5 yards, and McAllister lateraled to Jerome Pathon for 21 yards and a touchdown. The score was 20–19, leaving only the extra point to force overtime. However, in an unlikely twist, John Carney, who in his career made 98.4% of extra points attempted and had not missed one in a full decade, inexplicably missed the kick wide right, causing the Saints to miss the playoffs for the third straight season.

Fontenot

Fontenot is a surname of a number of American people, and may refer to:

Al Fontenot (born 1970), Chicago Bears defensive lineman

Canray Fontenot, musician

Jerry Fontenot (born 1966) football center

Herman Fontenot (born 1963) football running back

Heulette Fontenot (born 1961) Louisiana politician and documentary film maker

Karl Fontenot, convicted murderer

Mary Alice Fontenot (1910–2003), children's books author

Mike Fontenot (born 1980), baseball player

Therrian Fontenot (born 1981), Philadelphia Eagles cornerback

Lafayette High School (Louisiana)

Lafayette High School (LHS) is a public four-year high school located in Lafayette, Louisiana.

With an enrollment of approximately 2400 students (as of 2014), Lafayette High is the largest school in the state of Louisiana. Students from around the district can enter Lafayette High through several programs, including Gifted and Talented, Special Education, Visually Impaired, Hearing Impaired, ESL, Performing Arts Academy, or through the Academy of Health Careers. LHS has approximately 13 sports and athletics teams and 46 clubs and organizations.

Sam Gash

Samuel Lee Gash Jr. (born March 7, 1969) is a former American football fullback in the National Football League (NFL).

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