Jermaine Dye

Jermaine Trevell Dye (born January 28, 1974) is an American former professional baseball right fielder. Dye grew up in Northern California and was a multi-sport star at Will C. Wood High School in Vacaville.[1] Dye attended Cosumnes River College in Sacramento, where he played as a right fielder on a team that reached the playoffs.[2] Dye played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Atlanta Braves (1996), Kansas City Royals (1997–2001), Oakland Athletics (2001–2004), and the Chicago White Sox (2005–2009). He won the World Series MVP with the White Sox in 2005. Dye batted and threw right-handed and, in his prime, was known for his ability to hit for power and his powerful throwing arm.[3] Dye announced his retirement on March 31, 2011.[4]

Jermaine Dye
More White Sox pictures-Jermaine Dye
Dye with the Chicago White Sox
Right fielder
Born: January 28, 1974 (age 45)
Oakland, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 18, 1996, for the Atlanta Braves
Last MLB appearance
October 4, 2009, for the Chicago White Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.274
Home runs325
Runs batted in1,072
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

Atlanta Braves

He attended Will C. Wood High School in Vacaville, California, and Cosumnes River College in Sacramento. He was selected by Atlanta in the 17th round of the 1993 amateur draft. Dye made his Major League debut with the Braves, hitting a home run in his first Major League at-bat. He was traded to the Royals during the 1997 offseason in a package that brought Michael Tucker and Keith Lockhart to Atlanta.

Kansas City Royals

He was traded to Kansas City on March 27, 1997. In 1999 Dye played in 158 games for the Royals, hitting 26 home runs. He was one of the more well-liked Royals at that time, with fans frequently chanting "Dye-no-mite" after he came up to bat. The next year he made the American League All-Star team. In 2001 Dye was traded to Oakland as part of a three-way deal in which the Royals received Neifi Pérez.

Oakland Athletics

Jermaine wore jersey number 24, which would later be retired for Rickey Henderson. He batted .252 while with the A's. In October 2001, during the ALDS, Dye broke his leg when he fouled a ball off of his left knee.[5]

Chicago White Sox

Prior to the 2005 season, Dye was signed by the Chicago White Sox to a two-year, $10.15 million free-agent contract with an option for 2007.[1]

He played 145 games in 2005, the most since his injury, including an appearance at first base and shortstop. He batted .274 with 31 home runs, slugged .512 and stole 11 bases in regular season play, and was named World Series MVP, batting .438 with one home run and three RBIs. His RBI single off Houston Astros closer Brad Lidge provided the deciding run in Chicago's 1-0 Game 4 victory, clinching the Series sweep.

2006 proved to be his best offensive season; he finished second in the league with 44 home runs, third in slugging at .622, fifth in runs batted in with 120, batted .315, and placed fifth in AL Most Valuable Player voting.[6] On Mother's Day, May 14, Dye was one of more than 50 hitters who brandished a pink bat to benefit the Breast Cancer Foundation. Dye was selected to the American League All-Star Team for the second time in his career after a scorching first half in which he batted .318, struck 25 home runs and slugged .646. Dye was awarded a Silver Slugger for his offensive performance.

On October 30, 2006, the White Sox exercised their $6.75 million option for Dye's 2007 season.[7]

Dye, along with many other Chicago hitters, struggled in the first half of 2007, including a cold June in which he batted just .203 with one home run. He turned his game around in the second half, batting .298 and knocking out 20 doubles and 16 home runs, and finished with a batting line of .254/.317/.486. He was signed to a two-year contract extension in August.

He returned to form in 2008 for the division champion White Sox, finishing second in the American League with 77 extra-base hits and batting .292 with 34 home runs overall. Dye finished second to Tampa Bay's Evan Longoria in Final Vote balloting for the last spot on the American League All-Star roster.

On November 6, 2009, Dye's $12 million mutual option was bought out for $950,000, making him a free agent.[8]

On March 31, 2011, Dye announced his retirement.[4][9]

Career statistics

Years Games PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO AVG OBP SLG FLD%
14 1763 7214 6487 984 1779 363 25 325 1072 597 1308 .274 .338 .488 .981

In the postseason, covering 44 games, Dye batted .270 (44-for-163) with 16 runs, 9 doubles, 5 home runs, 17 RBI and 12 walks.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-11. Retrieved 2014-03-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-06-07. Retrieved 2014-03-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Royals Right Fielder Jermaine Dye Kansas City's New Star Archived 2007-03-25 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ a b Matthew Pouliot (March 31, 2011). "Unsigned Jermaine Dye opts for retirement". NBCSports.com. Retrieved July 10, 2013.
  5. ^ "A's Dye breaks leg, out for year". The Free Lance-Star. 15 October 2001. Retrieved 26 November 2014.
  6. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/awards/awards_2006.shtml
  7. ^ http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/baseball/mlb/10/30/bc.bba.whitesoxmoves.ap/index.html?eref=si_topstories
  8. ^ Teahen Era begins, but Dye's might be over Archived 2009-11-08 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Ken Rosenthal (March 31, 2011). "Dye 'at peace' with decision to retire". Foxsports.com. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Albert Belle
Jim Thome
American League Player of the Month
April 2000
August 2001
Succeeded by
Edgar Martínez
Eric Chavez
1993 Major League Baseball draft

The 1993 Major League Baseball draft began with first round selections on June 3, 1993. Alex Rodriguez was selected first overall by the Seattle Mariners. Other notable draftees included Chris Carpenter, Torii Hunter, Jason Varitek, Scott Rolen, future NFL Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk, and Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward.

1996 National League Championship Series

The 1996 National League Championship Series (NLCS) matched the East Division champion Atlanta Braves and the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals. It was the second NLCS meeting of the two teams and first since 1982. The Braves won in seven games, becoming the eighth team in baseball history to win a best-of-seven postseason series after being down 3–1, and first to overcome such a deficit in the NLCS. They outscored the Cardinals, 32–1, over the final three games. Also, Bobby Cox became the only manager to be on both the winning and losing end of such a comeback in postseason history, having previously blown the 1985 American League Championship Series with the Toronto Blue Jays against the Kansas City Royals.

The Braves would go on to lose to the New York Yankees in the World Series in six games.

1996 National League Division Series

The 1996 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1996 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Saturday, October 5, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 96–66) vs. (4) Los Angeles Dodgers (Wild Card, 90–72): Braves won series, 3–0.

(2) San Diego Padres (Western Division champion, 91–71) vs. (3) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champion, 88–74): Cardinals won series, 3–0.The St. Louis Cardinals and Atlanta Braves both swept their Division Series, and went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Braves would rally to win that series four games to three and become the National League champion, but would lose to the American League champion New York Yankees in the 1996 World Series.

1997 Kansas City Royals season

The 1997 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 67 wins and 94 losses.

2000 Kansas City Royals season

The 2000 Kansas City Royals season involved the Royals finishing 4th in the American League Central with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses.

2000 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2000 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 71st playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 2000 at Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia, home of the Atlanta Braves of the National League.

The Florida Marlins were originally awarded the 2000 All-Star Game in July 1995, but due to concerns over the chronically low attendance figures at Pro Player Stadium and the long-term viability of the South Florida market, National League president Len Coleman revoked the game from Miami in December 1998. The Marlins finally got to host the All-Star Game for the first time, 17 years later.

Coleman announced Atlanta would be the replacement host of the game, giving the Braves the chance to host their first All-Star Game since 1972. Turner Field, which opened in 1997 played a factor in Coleman's decision to award the game to Atlanta, citing Major League Baseball's desire to have the All-Star Game played in newer venues as a way to showcase the ballparks.

The 2000 All-Star Game was one of the few occurrences in which the manager of the host team also managed the home team of the game, in this case, the National League (Bobby Cox had led the Braves to the World Series the previous year earning the right to manage the National League).

The result of the game was the American League defeating the National League by a score of 6–3. The game is remembered for Chipper Jones' home run off James Baldwin. This was also the last MLB All-Star Game that was broadcast on NBC.

2001 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 2001 season was the team's 34th in Oakland, California, and the 101st season in franchise history. The team finished second in the American League West with a record of 102-60.

The Athletics entered the 2001 season with high expectations. Much of the excitement stemmed from the team's trio of promising young starting pitchers (Barry Zito, Mark Mulder, and Tim Hudson); after a strong showing in 2000, many expected the Athletics' rotation to rank among the American League's best in 2001. The signing of additional starter Cory Lidle during the 2000-01 offseason helped solidify the rotation's back-end. On offense, the Athletics were loaded; sluggers Miguel Tejada, Eric Chavez, and reigning American League MVP Jason Giambi comprised the core of a powerful Oakland attack. The addition of Johnny Damon, acquired in a three-way trade for Ben Grieve, promised to add a new dimension to the Athletics' offense. A strong bullpen (led by Chad Bradford, Jim Mecir, and Jason Isringhausen) rounded out Oakland's roster.

These high expectations quickly evaporated. The Athletics stumbled out of the gate (winning just two of their first dozen games); while their play nominally improved over the first half of the season, they failed to build upon the momentum of their division-winning 2000 campaign. The rival Seattle Mariners, in stark contrast, raced to a historic 52-14 start. As expected, the offense performed well; Oakland was instead hamstrung by unexpectedly terrible starting pitching. At the season's midpoint, the A's boasted a sub-.500 record (39-42); they trailed the division-leading Mariners by some 21 games.

The Athletics responded with arguably the most dominant second half in modern MLB history. Over their final 81 regular season games, the A's went 63-18 (a record since the league switched to a 162-game schedule); this included 29 wins in their final 33 games. The Athletics' maligned rotation returned to form; over their final games, Zito, Mulder, Hudson, and Lidle went a combined 48-10. On July 25, the Athletics acquired slugger Jermaine Dye from the Kansas City Royals for prospects; this move further energized the already-surging squad. The Athletics ultimately weren't able to catch up with Seattle (which won an AL-record 116 games), but their remarkable run allowed them to clinch the AL's Wild Card. The Athletics' 102 wins remain the most by a Wild Card team in MLB history.

The Athletics faced the New York Yankees (the three-time defending World Series champions) in the ALDS. Oakland took the first two games, but unraveled after a heartbreaking 1-0 loss in Game 3, in which Jeremy Giambi was infamously thrown out at the plate after a relay throw was flipped by Derek Jeter to Jorge Posada; they would lose the series to the Yankees in five games. At the end of the season, Oakland would lose Jason Giambi, Johnny Damon, and Jason Isringhausen to free agency; this would set the stage for the events portrayed in Michael Lewis' bestselling book Moneyball (and the film by the same name).

2005 Chicago White Sox season

The 2005 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 105th season. They finished with a 99–63 record in the regular season and first place in the American League Central division by six games over the Cleveland Indians. In the playoffs, they won the American League Division Series 3–0 over the defending world champion Boston Red Sox, the American League Championship Series 4–1 over the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, and the World Series 4–0 over the Houston Astros, ending an 88-year championship drought.

2005 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 2005 season was a season in which the Houston Astros qualified for the postseason for the second consecutive season. The Astros overcame a sluggish 15–30 start to claim the wild card playoff spot, and would go on to win the National League pennant to advance to the World Series for the first time in franchise history. It was longtime Astros first baseman Jeff Bagwell's final season and first World Series appearance.

2005 World Series

The 2005 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2005 season. The 101st edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Chicago White Sox and the National League (NL) champion Houston Astros; the White Sox swept the Astros in four games, winning their third World Series championship and their first in 88 seasons. Although the series was a sweep, all four games were quite close, being decided by two runs or fewer. The series was played between October 22–26, 2005.

Home-field advantage was awarded to Chicago by virtue of the AL's 7–5 victory over the NL in the 2005 MLB All-Star Game. The Astros were attempting to become the fourth consecutive wild card team to win the Series, following the Anaheim Angels (2002), Florida Marlins (2003) and Boston Red Sox (2004). Both teams were attempting to overcome decades of disappointment, with a combined 132 years between the two teams without a title. The Astros were making their first Series appearance in 44 years of play, while the White Sox had waited exactly twice as long for a title, having last won the Series in 1917, and had not been in the Series since 1959, three years before the Astros' inaugural season.

Like the 1982 World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Milwaukee Brewers, the 2005 World Series is one of only two World Series in the modern era (1903–present) with no possibility for a rematch between the two opponents, because the Astros moved to the AL in 2013. However, the Brewers did meet the Cardinals in the 2011 NL Championship Series. The Astros would return to the World Series in 2017 as an AL franchise, where they would win in seven games against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

2006 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2006 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 77th playing of the midseason exhibition baseball game between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 2006 at PNC Park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the home of the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League. The contest was the fifth hosted by the city of Pittsburgh – tying the Cleveland Indians for the record of most times hosted by a single franchise. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3–2, thus awarding the AL champion (which was eventually the Detroit Tigers) home-field advantage in the 2006 World Series.

2006 Major League Baseball Home Run Derby

The 2006 Century 21 Home Run Derby was a 2006 Major League Baseball All-Star Game event held at PNC Park, the home field of the Pittsburgh Pirates on July 10, 2006. The competition had eight competitors as usual and seven were eliminated in over three rounds. Ryan Howard of the Philadelphia Phillies defeated David Wright of the New York Mets to be crowned derby champion. A total of 87 home runs were hit in the derby.

2006 Major League Baseball season

The 2006 Major League Baseball season ended with the National League's St. Louis Cardinals winning the World Series with the lowest regular season victory total in a non-strike season in history. The American League continued its domination at the All-Star Game by winning its fourth straight game; the A.L. has won nine of the last ten contests (the 2002 game was a tie). This season, the Atlanta Braves failed to qualify for the postseason for the first time since 1990. Individual achievements included Barry Bonds who, despite questions surrounding his alleged steroid use and involvement in the BALCO scandal, surpassed Babe Ruth for second place on the career home runs list.

Danville Braves

The Danville Braves are a minor league baseball team in Danville, Virginia. They are an Advanced Rookie-level team in the Appalachian League and have been a farm team of the Atlanta Braves since 1982. Since 1993, the Braves have played home games at American Legion Post 325 Field. Opened in 1993, Legion Field seats 2,588 fans. Previously, they played at Calfee Park in Pulaski.

On September 3, 2006, Danville won their first ever Appalachian League championship, defeating the Elizabethton Twins 2 games to 1, in a best of three series. On September 3, 2009, Danville won their second Appalachian League championship, again defeating the Elizabethton Twins, this time two games to zero.

The Danville Braves mascot is a large, green bird named Blooper.

Keith Lockhart (baseball)

Keith Virgil Lockhart (born November 10, 1964 in Whittier, California) is a retired second baseman and third baseman who played for 10 seasons in Major League Baseball from 1994-2003.

Lockhart, a left-handed batter, played college baseball at Oral Roberts University and was originally drafted by Cincinnati Reds in the 11th round of the 1986 Amateur Draft. He spent 8 full seasons in the minor league systems of three different organizations before earning a spot on the San Diego Padres' opening day roster in 1994. He played in 27 games with the Padres in his first year before leaving as a free agent and signing with the Kansas City Royals during the 1994 season.

Lockhart played for the Royals in both 1995 and 1996. In his first season, he batted a career best .321, earning him a role as a platoon player in 1996. Sharing time at second base with Bip Roberts and at third base with Joe Randa and Craig Paquette, Lockhart hit .273 and drove in 55 runs.

Shortly before the start of the 1997 season, Lockhart and outfielder Michael Tucker were traded to the Atlanta Braves for outfielder Jermaine Dye, and Rule V selection Jamie Walker.

Lockhart stayed in Atlanta for 6 seasons, from 1997 to 2002. He primarily served as a reserve second baseman and also served as a pinch hitter, contributing 59 pinch hits as a Brave. He served as a platoon player on two occasions with the Braves; in 1998 (a year which saw the Braves win a team-record 106 games), Lockhart platooned with Tony Graffanino, while in 2002, he platooned with Mark DeRosa following an injury to Marcus Giles.

He came close to being the hero of the Braves' epic struggle with the New York Mets in Game 5 of the 1999 NLCS. Lockhart, who came into the game as a replacement after Bret Boone was pinch-run for, hit an RBI triple in the 15th inning to give the Braves a 3–2 lead. The lead was squandered in the bottom of the inning, however, after a bases loaded walk tied the game; Robin Ventura's famed Grand Slam Single would later win it for the Mets.

In 2003, he returned to San Diego for what would be his last major league season and served as the backup to Mark Loretta. He retired at season's end with a .261 career batting average, 44 career home runs, and 268 runs batted in.

Lockhart was the final out of the 1999 World Series. He flied out to left field.

In 2011, his son Danny became a 10th round draft pick for the Cubs and has signed with their farm team.

Lamar Johnson

Lamar Johnson Sr. (born September 2, 1950), is a retired American professional baseball player and former hitting coach for the Milwaukee Brewers, Kansas City Royals, Seattle Mariners and New York Mets. Johnson was a first baseman who played in the Major Leagues from 1974 to 1982 for the Chicago White Sox and Texas Rangers. A right-handed batter and thrower, Johnson stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and weighed 215 pounds (98 kg).

On perhaps the best day in his career, on June 19, 1977, against the A's, Johnson sang the National Anthem before the game, and followed up with two homers, the only White Sox hits on the day, as the Sox won 2-1.

List of Chicago White Sox award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Chicago White Sox professional baseball team.

Mark Buehrle's perfect game

Mark Buehrle of the Chicago White Sox pitched a perfect game against the Tampa Bay Rays by retiring all nine batters he faced three times each on Thursday, July 23, 2009. This event took place in U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago in front of 28,036 fans in attendance. This game took 2:03 from 1:07 PM CT to 3:10 PM CT.

It was the eighteenth perfect game and 263rd no-hitter in MLB history, second perfect game and seventeenth no-hitter in White Sox history. The previous perfect game in MLB history was on May 18, 2004 when Randy Johnson of the Arizona Diamondbacks pitched a perfect game against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field. The previous occasion a White Sox pitcher threw a perfect game was on April 30, 1922 when Charlie Robertson pitched a perfecto against the Detroit Tigers at Navin Field (later known as Tiger Stadium); that was the fifth perfect game in MLB history.

Buehrle also logged his second career no-hitter; the first was against the Texas Rangers on April 18, 2007. He became the first pitcher to throw multiple no-hitters since Johnson. Buehrle did this in the midst of setting a Major League record by retiring 45 consecutive batters over three games.The umpire, Eric Cooper, who stood behind the plate for this perfect game was the same home plate umpire when Buehrle threw his first career no-hitter. Ramón Castro was the catcher.

At the time, the Rays were tied for the second-highest on-base percentage (.343) of any team, so they were one of the least likely to allow a perfect game. Buehrle’s perfect game was to become the first of three perfect games and the first of four no-hitters allowed by Rays in less than three years:

the second was delivered by Dallas Braden of the Oakland Athletics on May 9, 2010 (Mother's Day)

the third was pitched by Edwin Jackson of the Arizona Diamondbacks on June 25, 2010

and the fourth, which meant the Rays tied the Dodgers as the only MLB franchise to allow three perfect games, being delivered by Félix Hernández on August 15, 2012.

Mesa Solar Sox

The Mesa Solar Sox are a baseball team that plays in the East Division of the Arizona Fall League. They play their home games in Mesa, Arizona at Sloan Park, which is also the spring training facility of the Chicago Cubs.

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