Jere Cooper

Jere Cooper (July 20, 1893 – December 18, 1957) was a Democratic United States Representative from Tennessee.

Jere Cooper
Jere Cooper (Tennessee Congressman)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 8th district
In office
March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1943
Preceded byGordon Browning
Succeeded byTom J. Murray
In office
January 3, 1953 – December 18, 1957
Preceded byTom Murray
Succeeded byFats Everett
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 9th district
In office
March 4, 1929 – March 3, 1933
Preceded byFinis J. Garrett
Succeeded byE. H. Crump
In office
January 3, 1943 – January 3, 1953
Preceded byClifford Davis
Succeeded byClifford Davis
Personal details
BornJuly 20, 1893
Dyer County, Tennessee
DiedDecember 18, 1957 (aged 64)
Bethesda, Maryland
Citizenship United States
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Mary Rankley Cooper
ChildrenJere Cooper
Alma materCumberland School of Law
ProfessionAttorney politician
Military service
AllegianceUnited States United States of America
Branch/serviceUnited States Army
RankFirst Lieutenant Captain(July 9, 1918)
UnitSecond Tennessee Infantry, National Guard Co K, 119th Infantry, Thirtieth Division
Battles/warsWorld War I (France and Belgium)

Biography

Cooper was born on a farm near Dyersburg, Dyer County, Tennessee, son of Joseph W. and Viola May (Cooper) Cooper. He attended public schools and then was graduated from the Cumberland School of Law in Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1914. He was admitted to the bar in 1915 and commenced practice in Dyersburg, Tennessee. He married Mary Rankley in December 1930; the couple had one son, Leon Jere Cooper, who died as a child.[1]

Career

Upon the U.S. entry into World War I in 1917, Cooper enlisted in the Second Tennessee Infantry, National Guard, and was commissioned a First Lieutenant. Later he was transferred, with his company, to Co K, 119th Infantry, Thirtieth Division, and served in France and Belgium. On July 9, 1918, he was promoted to Captain and served as regimental adjutant until discharged from the Army on April 2, 1919. After the war he resumed the practice of law in Dyersburg.

Cooper was a member of the city council and city attorney from 1920 to 1928, and was elected Department Commander of the American Legion of Tennessee in 1921.

Elected as a Democrat to the 71st, and to the fourteen succeeding, Congresses, Cooper served from March 4, 1929, until his death.[2] He served as chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means (84th and 85th Congresses), and on the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation (Eighty-fifth Congress).[3]

He was a signatory to the 1956 Southern Manifesto that opposed the desegregation of public schools ordered by the Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education.

Death

Cooper died in Bethesda, Maryland, on December 18, 1957 (age 64 years, 151 days). He is interred at Fairview Cemetery, Dyersburg, Tennessee.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Jere Cooper". Tennessee Historical Society. Retrieved 6 May 2013.
  2. ^ "Jere Cooper". Govtrack US Congress. Retrieved 6 May 2013.
  3. ^ "Jere Cooper". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 6 May 2013.
  4. ^ "Jere Cooper". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 6 May 2013.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Finis J. Garrett
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 9th congressional district

1929–1933
Succeeded by
E. H. Crump
Preceded by
Gordon Browning
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 8th congressional district

1933–1943
Succeeded by
Tom J. Murray
Preceded by
Clifford Davis
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 9th congressional district

1943–1953
Succeeded by
Clifford Davis
Preceded by
Tom Murray
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 8th congressional district

1953–1957
Succeeded by
Fats Everett
82nd United States Congress

The Eighty-second United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1951, to January 3, 1953, during the last two years of the second administration of U.S. President Harry S. Truman.

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Sixteenth Census of the United States in 1940. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

85th United States Congress

The Eighty-fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1957, to January 3, 1959, during the fifth and sixth years of Dwight Eisenhower's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventeenth Census of the United States in 1950. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Clifford Davis (politician)

Clifford Davis (November 18, 1897 – June 8, 1970) was a Democratic U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1940 to 1965.

Cumberland School of Law

Cumberland Law School is unrelated to the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky, and is no longer a part of Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tennessee.Cumberland School of Law is an ABA accredited law school at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama, United States. Founded in 1847 at Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tennessee, it is the 11th oldest law school in the United States and has more than 11,000 graduates. Its alumni include two United States Supreme Court Justices; Nobel Peace Prize recipient Cordell Hull, "the father of the United Nations"; over 50 U.S. representatives; and numerous senators, governors, and judges.

The school offers two degree programs: the 90-hour Juris Doctor (J.D.), and the Master of Comparative Law (M.C.L.), which is designed to educate foreign lawyers in the basic legal principles of the United States. The school also offers eight dual-degree programs and a Master of Laws (LL.M) program with concentrations in financial service regulatory compliance, health law and policy, higher education law and compliance, and legal project management.

Democratic Caucus Chairman of the United States House of Representatives

The following is a list of members of the U.S. House of Representatives who have served as chair of the House Democratic Caucus. Chairs are currently limited to two consecutive terms.

E. H. Crump

Edward Hull "Boss" Crump (October 2, 1874 – October 16, 1954) was an American politician from Memphis, Tennessee. Representing the Democratic Party, he was the dominant force in the city's politics for most of the first half of the 20th century, during which the city had a commission form of government. He also dominated Tennessee state politics for most of the time from the 1920s to the 1940s. He was elected and served as mayor of Memphis from 1910 through 1915, and again briefly in 1940. However, he effectively appointed every mayor elected from 1915 to 1954.

Fats Everett

Robert Ashton "Fats" Everett (February 24, 1915 – January 26, 1969) was an American Democratic Congressman from Tennessee from February 1, 1958 until his death in Nashville, Tennessee in 1969.

Finis J. Garrett

Finis James Garrett (August 26, 1875 – May 25, 1956) was a United States Representative from Tennessee and a Chief Judge of the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals.

Gordon Browning

Gordon Weaver Browning (November 22, 1889 – May 23, 1976) was an American politician who served as Governor of Tennessee from 1937 to 1939, and again from 1949 to 1953. He also served six terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, from 1923 to 1935, and was Chancellor of Tennessee's Eighth Chancery District in the 1940s. As governor, he stabilized state finances, doubled the state's mileage of paved roads, and enacted legislation to curb voter fraud. His victory in the hard-fought 1948 gubernatorial campaign helped break the power of Memphis political boss E. H. Crump.In the years following World War II, Browning served in the Allied occupational government in Germany, and was a civil affairs advisor on the staff of General Dwight D. Eisenhower.

House Democratic Caucus

The House Democratic Caucus is a congressional caucus composed of all Democratic Representatives in the United States House of Representatives and is responsible for nominating and electing the Democratic Party leadership in the chamber. In its roles as a party conference, the caucus writes and enforces rules of conduct and discipline for its members, approves committee assignments, and serves as the primary forum for development of party policy and legislative priorities. It hosts weekly meetings for these purposes and to communicate the party's message to members. The caucus has a Caucus Chairman and Caucus Vice-Chair (formerly called the Secretary).

For the 116th Congress, which began in 2019, Hakeem Jeffries of New York serves as Chair, with Katherine Clark of Massachusetts as Vice-Chair.

Jere (name)

Jere may refer to:

Given name:

Empress Xiaoduanwen (1600-1649), personal name Jere (or Jerjer), Empress Consort of Hong Taiji of the Qing Dynasty

Jere Abbott (1897–1982), art historian and first associate director of the Museum of Modern Art

Jere Allen, American painter and former art professor

Jere L. Bacharach (born 1938), American history professor emeritus

Jere Baxter (1852–1904), American businessman, lawyer and politician

Jere Beasley (born 1935), American attorney and politician

Jere Bergius (born 1987), Finnish pole vaulter

Jere Brophy, American educational psychologist

Jere Cooper (1893-1957), American politician

Jere Gillis (born 1957), American National Hockey League player

Jered Guzman (born 1981), American retired pairs figure skater

Jere Hård (born 1978), Finnish retired swimmer

Jere Hargrove (born 1946), American politician

Jere T. Humphreys (born 1949), American music scholar

Jere Karalahti (born 1975), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Karjalainen (born 1992), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Laaksonen (born 1991), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Lehtinen (born 1973), Finnish National Hockey League player

Jere H. Lipps (born 1939), American paleontologist, academic and skeptic

Jere Michael (born 1977), American former figure skater

Jere Morehead, American lawyer, law professor and President of the University of Georgia

Jere Myllyniemi (born 1983), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Ölander (born 1989), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Osgood (born 1936), furniture maker and teacher

Jere Pulli (born 1991), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Ratcliffe, Chief Scout Executive (1993-2000) of the Boy Scouts of America

Jere Sallinen (born 1990), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Schuler (born 1934), American retired politician

Jere Seppälä (born 1993), Finnish ice hockey player

Jere Strittmatter (born 1950), American former politician

Jere Uronen (born 1994), Finnish footballer

Jere Wood, longtime mayor of Roswell, Georgia, United StatesSurname:

Besnat Jere, member of the Pan-African Parliament

Dickson Jere, Zambian lawyer, journalist, author and political analyst

Otria Moyo Jere (born 1959), Malawian politician, Deputy Minister of Education, Science and Technology beginning 2009Other:

John Jere Blake (1875-1933), Welsh rugby union player

Jerald Jere Burns (born 1954), American actor

Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack

The Joint Committee on the Investigation of the Pearl Harbor Attack, also known as The Pearl Harbor Committee, was a committee of members of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives formed during the 79th United States Congress after World War II to investigate the causes of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, and possible preventative measures against future attacks. The resolution for the formation of this committee passed in the Senate on September 6, 1945, and in the House on September 11, 1945. The final report of the committee issued on June 20, 1946.

Southern Manifesto

The Declaration of Constitutional Principles (known informally as the Southern Manifesto) was a document written in February and March 1956, in the United States Congress, in opposition to racial integration of public places. The manifesto was signed by 101 congressmen (99 Southern Democrats and two Republicans) from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. The document was drafted to counter the landmark Supreme Court 1954 ruling Brown v. Board of Education, which determined that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional. School segregation laws were some of the most enduring and best-known of the Jim Crow laws that characterized the American South and border states at the time.Senators led the opposition, with Strom Thurmond writing the initial draft and Richard Russell the final version. The manifesto was signed by 19 senators and 82 representatives, including the entire Congressional delegations of the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Virginia. All of the signatories were Southern Democrats except two Virginia Republicans, Joel Broyhill and Richard Poff. However, three Southern Senate Democrats refused to sign: Albert Gore Sr. and Estes Kefauver of Tennessee, and Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas. Their opposition earned them the enmity of their colleagues for a time.

The Southern Manifesto accused the Supreme Court of "clear abuse of judicial power" and promised to use "all lawful means to bring about a reversal of this decision which is contrary to the Constitution and to prevent the use of force in its implementation." It suggested that the Tenth Amendment should limit the reach of the Supreme Court on such issues.

Tennessee's 8th congressional district

The 8th Congressional District of Tennessee is a congressional district in West Tennessee. It has been represented by Republican David Kustoff since January 2017.

Tennessee's 9th congressional district

Tennessee's 9th congressional district is a congressional district in West Tennessee. It has been represented by Democrat Steve Cohen since 2006.

Tom J. Murray

Thomas Jefferson Murray (August 1, 1894 – November 28, 1971), usually known as Tom J. Murray, was an American politician and a Democratic U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1943 to 1966.

United States House Committee on Ways and Means

The Committee on Ways and Means is the chief tax-writing committee of the United States House of Representatives. Members of the Ways and Means Committee are not allowed to serve on any other House Committee unless they are granted a waiver from their party's congressional leadership. The Committee has jurisdiction over all taxation, tariffs, and other revenue-raising measures, as well as a number of other programs including Social Security, unemployment benefits, Medicare, the enforcement of child support laws, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and foster care and adoption programs.

The United States Constitution requires that all bills regarding taxation must originate in the U.S. House of Representatives, and House rules dictate that all bills regarding taxation must pass through Ways and Means. This system imparts upon the committee and its members a significant degree of influence over other representatives, committees, and public policy. (See also, the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance.)

Recent chairmen have included Bill Thomas, Charlie Rangel, Sander Levin, Dave Camp, Paul Ryan and Kevin Brady. On January 3, 2019, Richard Neal was sworn in as the new Chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means, upon the commencement of the 116th Congress. He used his authority as chairman to formally request the tax returns of President Trump in April 2019, after Democrats had signaled their intention to do so on the midterms election night.

United States congressional delegations from Tennessee

These are tables of congressional delegations from Tennessee to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Wilbur Mills

Wilbur Daigh Mills (May 24, 1909 – May 2, 1992) was an American Democratic politician who represented Arkansas's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1939 until his retirement in 1977 following a sex scandal. As chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee from 1958 to 1974, he was often called "the most powerful man in Washington."

Born in Kensett, Arkansas, Mills pursued a legal career and helped run his father's bank after graduating from Harvard Law School. He served as the county judge of White County, Arkansas before winning election to the United States House of Representatives in 1938. As Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, Mills played a large role in the establishment of Medicare. He also helped pass the Tax Reform Act of 1969, which created the alternative minimum tax.

Mills ran for president in 1972, championing an automatic Cost of Living adjustment to Social Security, but he performed poorly in the Democratic primaries. After two public incidents with a stripper named Fanne Foxe, he declined to seek re-election in 1976. After leaving office, he returned to the practice of law and helped establish a center for the treatment of alcoholism.

Tennessee's delegation(s) to the 71st–85th United States Congresses (ordered by seniority)
71st Senate: K. McKellarL. Tyson House: J. Byrns Sr.H. FisherE. DavisW. TaylorC. ReeceG. BrowningC. HullS. McReynoldsE. Eslick • J. Cooper
71st Senate: K. McKellarW. Brock House: J. Byrns Sr.H. FisherE. DavisW. TaylorC. ReeceG. BrowningC. HullS. McReynoldsE. Eslick • J. Cooper
72nd Senate: K. McKellarC. Hull House: J. Byrns Sr.E. DavisW. TaylorG. BrowningS. McReynoldsE. Eslick • J. Cooper • E. H. CrumpJ. MitchellO. Lovette
72nd Senate: K. McKellarC. Hull House: J. Byrns Sr.E. DavisW. TaylorG. BrowningS. McReynolds • J. Cooper • E. H. CrumpJ. MitchellO. LovetteW. Eslick
73rd Senate: K. McKellarN. Bachman House: J. Byrns Sr.W. TaylorG. BrowningS. McReynolds • J. Cooper • E. H. CrumpJ. MitchellC. ReeceC. Turner
74th Senate: K. McKellarN. Bachman House: J. Byrns Sr.W. TaylorS. McReynolds • J. Cooper • J. MitchellC. ReeceC. TurnerW. ChandlerH. Pearson
75th Senate: K. McKellarN. Bachman House: W. TaylorS. McReynolds • J. Cooper • J. MitchellC. ReeceC. TurnerW. ChandlerH. PearsonR. Atkinson
75th Senate: K. McKellarG. Berry House: W. TaylorS. McReynolds • J. Cooper • J. MitchellC. ReeceC. TurnerW. ChandlerH. PearsonR. Atkinson
76th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: W. TaylorS. McReynolds • J. Cooper • C. ReeceC. TurnerW. ChandlerH. PearsonJ. Byrns Jr.A. Gore Sr.
76th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: W. TaylorS. McReynolds • J. Cooper • C. ReeceW. ChandlerH. PearsonJ. Byrns Jr.A. Gore Sr.W. Courtney
76th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: W. Taylor • J. Cooper • C. ReeceW. ChandlerH. PearsonJ. Byrns Jr.A. Gore Sr.W. CourtneyE. Kefauver
76th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: J. Cooper • C. ReeceW. ChandlerH. PearsonJ. Byrns Jr.A. Gore Sr.W. CourtneyE. KefauverJ. Jennings
76th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: J. Cooper • C. ReeceH. PearsonJ. Byrns Jr.A. Gore Sr.W. CourtneyE. KefauverJ. JenningsC. Davis
77th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: J. Cooper • C. ReeceH. PearsonA. Gore Sr.W. CourtneyE. KefauverJ. JenningsC. DavisP. Priest
78th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: J. Cooper • C. ReeceA. Gore Sr.W. CourtneyE. KefauverJ. JenningsC. DavisP. PriestJ. McCordT. Murray
79th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: J. Cooper • C. ReeceA. Gore Sr.W. CourtneyE. KefauverJ. JenningsC. DavisP. PriestT. MurrayH. Earthman
80th Senate: K. McKellarT. Stewart House: J. Cooper • A. Gore Sr.W. CourtneyE. KefauverJ. JenningsC. DavisP. PriestT. MurrayJ. EvinsD. Phillips
81st Senate: K. McKellarE. Kefauver House: J. Cooper • A. Gore Sr.J. JenningsC. DavisP. PriestT. MurrayJ. EvinsD. PhillipsJ. Frazier Jr.J. Sutton
82nd Senate: K. McKellarE. Kefauver House: J. Cooper • A. Gore Sr.C. DavisP. PriestT. MurrayJ. EvinsJ. Frazier Jr.J. SuttonH. Baker Sr.C. Reece
83rd Senate: E. KefauverA. Gore Sr. House: J. Cooper • C. DavisP. PriestT. MurrayJ. EvinsJ. Frazier Jr.J. SuttonH. Baker Sr.C. Reece
84th Senate: E. KefauverA. Gore Sr. House: J. Cooper • C. DavisP. PriestT. MurrayJ. EvinsJ. Frazier Jr.H. Baker Sr.C. ReeceR. Bass
85th Senate: E. KefauverA. Gore Sr. House: J. Cooper • C. DavisT. MurrayJ. EvinsJ. Frazier Jr.H. Baker Sr.C. ReeceR. BassC. Loser

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