Jeffrey Maier

Jeffrey "Jeff" Maier (born November 15, 1983) is an American baseball fan who received media attention for an incident in which he was involved as a 12-year-old at a baseball game. During Game 1 of the 1996 American League Championship Series between the New York Yankees and the Baltimore Orioles, Maier deflected a batted ball, hit by Derek Jeter, into the Yankee Stadium stands for what umpires ruled to be a home run, rather than fan interference. His action altered the course of Game 1,[1] as the resulting home run allowed the Yankees to tie the score.[2] They won the game and won the series four games to one en route to winning the World Series.

Jeffrey Maier
BornNovember 15, 1983 (age 35)
NationalityAmerican
Known forGame 1 of the 1996 American League Championship Series

Incident

On October 9, 1996, the Yankees trailed the Orioles 4–3 in the bottom of the eighth inning when shortstop Derek Jeter hit a deep fly ball to right field. Right fielder Tony Tarasco moved near the fence and appeared "to draw a bead on the ball"[3] when the then-12-year-old Maier clearly reached over the fence separating the stands and the field of play nine feet below and snatched the ball with his glove. While baseball fans are permitted to catch (and keep) balls hit into the stands, the Major League Baseball rulebook states that spectator interference is to be called if "a spectator reaches out of the stands, or goes on the playing field, and touches a live ball"[4].

Right field umpire Rich Garcia immediately ruled the play a home run, tying the game at 4–4, despite the protest of Tarasco and Orioles manager Davey Johnson (the latter was ejected in the ensuing argument).

The Yankees won the game in the eleventh inning on Bernie Williams' walk-off home run. The Orioles maintained their protest of the Maier play after the conclusion of the game, but their protest was denied by American League President Gene Budig because judgment calls cannot be protested. After viewing the replay, Garcia admitted that there was spectator interference, though he maintained the ball was not catchable.[5] Garcia's contention that the ball was not catchable has been disputed.[6] Had Garcia ruled it spectator interference, he would have then used his own judgment to determine what the most likely outcome of the play would be—either an out or awarding Jeter a given number of bases.

The Yankees went on to win the series against Baltimore, four games to one, as well as the World Series against the Atlanta Braves. As a result of the play, a railing was added behind the right field wall at Yankee Stadium to prevent fans from reaching over it.

Meanwhile, in New York, Maier became a minor celebrity. The New York Daily News allowed him to sit behind the Yankee dugout later in the postseason. The boy appeared on national talk shows.

Baseball career

Maier grew up in Old Tappan, New Jersey, and played baseball there at Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan.[7] He then played college ball at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, where he was a first-team all-NESCAC selection. He also played briefly for the Pittsfield Dukes in the New England Collegiate Baseball League in the summer of 2005.

In 2006, he became Wesleyan's career hits leader and was featured on ESPN. The New York Times reported that Maier hoped for a career in baseball. That spring, the Washington Post and MLB.com reported that, ironically, the Baltimore Orioles might draft him—though the team denied ever having an interest in him.[8] Maier was also invited to a try out for the New York Yankees. However, he was not selected by any team in the 2006 Major League Baseball Draft.

Maier worked in the summer of 2006 as a scout in the Cape Cod League for ESPN's Peter Gammons and also as an instructor for Frozen Ropes Baseball Training Center. Maier later became a special consultant for the New Haven County Cutters[9] and had several internships, including with the YES Network. In addition, he served as an extra and assisted with baseball skills training for the actors in ESPN's miniseries about the 1977 Yankees, The Bronx Is Burning.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ Sheinin, Dave (June 2, 2006). "From Way Out in Right Field". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 6, 2010.
  2. ^ In Rematch, Memories of a Stolen Moment, NYT. By Zach Schonbrun. Published: October 6, 2012. Retrieved October 14, 2012.
  3. ^ Baseball Archived July 12, 2012, at Archive.today
  4. ^ The Official Site of Major League Baseball: Official info: Official Rules
  5. ^ Interview with Rich Garcia Archived October 21, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ The Official Site of Major League Baseball: Video: Baseball's Best
  7. ^ LaPointe, Joe (April 14, 2006). "Boy Who Helped Yankees Is a Hit Again". The New York Times. Retrieved August 18, 2008.
  8. ^ The Official Site of The Baltimore Orioles: News: Baltimore Orioles News
  9. ^ "Cutters Add Jeff Maier To Front Office Staff". OurSports Central. August 10, 2006. Retrieved April 10, 2012.
  10. ^ Steve Jacobson Archived February 22, 2013, at Archive.today

Further reading

Ruttman, Larry (2013). "Jeffrey Maier: Fan and Tenth Player". American Jews and America's Game: Voices of a Growing Legacy in Baseball. Lincoln, Nebraska and London, England: University of Nebraska Press. pp. 337=344. ISBN 978-0-8032-6475-5. This chapter in Ruttman's history, based on a February 14, 2008 interview with Maier conducted for the book, discusses Maier's American, Jewish, baseball, and life experiences from youth to the present.

External links

1996 American League Championship Series

The 1996 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 1996 American League playoffs, matched the East Division champion New York Yankees against the Wild Card team, the Baltimore Orioles. The Yankees had the home field advantage in the series because they had won their division and the Orioles were the Wild Card team.

1996 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1996 Baltimore Orioles season in which the Orioles finishing 2nd in the American League East with a record of 88 wins and 74 losses and qualifying for the post-season as the Wild Card team. The Orioles broke the all-time record for most home runs hit by a team (set at 240 by the 1961 New York Yankees) with 257. During the season, four Orioles scored at least 100 runs, four drove in at least 100 runs and seven hit at least 20 home runs. The Orioles pitching staff allowed 209 home runs, 1,604 hits and had an ERA of 5.15. The Orioles defeated the Cleveland Indians in the ALDS and then lost in the ALCS to the New York Yankees.

1996 New York Yankees season

The 1996 New York Yankees season was the 94th season for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball. The 1996 New York Yankees were managed by Joe Torre, and played at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx.

The team finished first in the American League Eastern Division with a record of 92–70, 4 games ahead of the Baltimore Orioles and won their first division title since 1981 (the 1994 team had the best record in the American League, but the strike took it away). The team defeated the Texas Rangers in the American League Division Series, three games to one. The Yankees went on to defeat the Orioles in the American League Championship Series four games to one.

In the 1996 World Series the Yankees beat the National League champion Atlanta Braves four games to two, winning four consecutive games to overcome a two-games-to-none deficit. New York became the first team to lose the first two games at home and win the Series. All told, the Yankees finished the post-season with an 8-0 road win-loss record, while going just 3-4 at home.

The Yankees earned their 23rd World Series title and their first since 1978. It was the very last season for Hall of Fame TV announcer Phil Rizzuto who left the team's broadcast crew that year.

2010 American League Championship Series

The 2010 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was the best-of-seven game series pitting the winners of the 2010 American League Division Series for the American League Championship. The American League wild card-winning New York Yankees faced the American League West Division champions Texas Rangers. The Rangers won the 2010 ALCS and faced the National League champion San Francisco Giants in the 2010 World Series, the franchise's first ever appearance in the World Series, but would go on to lose to the Giants in five games. The series, the 41st in league history, began October 15 and ended on October 22. The Rangers had home field advantage in the series, as the wild-card team defers home field advantage in the LDS and LCS regardless of regular-season record.

The Rangers and Yankees had met in the postseason in each of the Rangers' three previous postseason appearances; the Yankees had won all previous meetings, 3–1 in the 1996 ALDS, and 3–0 in the 1998 and 1999 ALDS.

2012 American League Division Series

The 2012 American League Division Series were two best-of-five-game series to determine the participating teams in the 2012 American League Championship Series. The three divisional winners and a fourth team—the winner of a one-game Wild Card playoff— played in two series. TBS carried most of the games, with some on MLB Network or TNT.

The series used the 2–3 format for 2012 because on March 2 the league had implemented the new "wild card" playoff, eliminating the travel day between Games 4 and 5. The 2–3 format was used for best-of-five Championship Series rounds prior to 1985 and for the Division Series rounds from 1995–1997. The matchups for the 2012 ALDS were:

(1) New York Yankees (East Division champions, 95–67) vs. (4) Baltimore Orioles (Wild Card Game winner, 93–69): Yankees win series, 3–2.

(2) Oakland Athletics (West Division champions, 94–68) vs. (3) Detroit Tigers (Central Division champions, 88–74): Tigers win series, 3–2.The restriction on teams from the same division meeting in the Division Series was removed prior to the 2012 season. Therefore, the Yankees and Orioles, both from the East Division, were able to meet in the Division Series. Under the format used from 1998-2011, (1) New York would have faced (3) Detroit in one Division Series, and (2) Oakland would have faced (4) Baltimore in the other.

This was the third postseason match-up between the Athletics and the Tigers, and previously the Tigers had defeated the A's 4–0 in the 2006 ALCS. The Yankees and Orioles were meeting in the postseason for the second time; the Yankees had beaten the Orioles 4–1 in the 1996 ALCS, which witnessed the controversial Jeffrey Maier incident in Game 1.

Armando Benítez

Armando Benítez (born November 3, 1972) is a retired relief pitcher. Benítez debuted with the Baltimore Orioles in 1994 and within a few years became their closer. He was a reliever for several other organizations after Baltimore in 1999 and last played in Major League Baseball in 2008. His 289 saves rank 25th all time. After 2008, he played in minor league and independent league baseball.

Baltimore Orioles

The Baltimore Orioles are an American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. As one of the American League's eight charter teams in 1901, this particular franchise spent its first year as a major league club in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as the Milwaukee Brewers (not related to the second current Brewers franchise there) before moving to St. Louis, Missouri, to become the St. Louis Browns. After 52 often-beleaguered years in St. Louis, the franchise was purchased in November 1953 by a syndicate of Baltimore business and civic interests led by attorney/civic activist Clarence Miles and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro Jr. The team's current owner is American trial lawyer Peter Angelos.

The Orioles adopted their team name in honor of the official state bird of Maryland; it had also been used by several previous major and minor league baseball clubs in Baltimore, including another AL charter member franchise also named the "Baltimore Orioles," which moved north in 1903 to eventually become the New York Yankees. Nicknames for the team include the "O's" and the "Birds".

The Orioles experienced their greatest success from 1966 to 1983, when they made six World Series appearances, winning three of them (1966, 1970, 1983). This era of the club featured several future Hall of Famers who would later be inducted representing the Orioles, such as third baseman Brooks Robinson, outfielder Frank Robinson, starting pitcher Jim Palmer, first baseman Eddie Murray, shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., and manager Earl Weaver. The Orioles have won a total of nine division championships (1969–1971, 1973–1974, 1979, 1983, 1997, 2014), six pennants (1966, 1969–1971, 1979, 1983), and three wild card berths (1996, 2012, 2016). Since moving to Baltimore in 1954, the franchise has a win-loss record of 5252-5066 (with a winning "percentage" of .509) as of the end of the 2018 season.After suffering a stretch of 14 straight losing seasons from 1998 to 2011, the team qualified for the postseason three times under manager Buck Showalter and general manager Dan Duquette, including a division title and advancement to the American League Championship Series for the first time in 17 years in 2014. However, the 2018 team finished with a franchise-worst record of 47–115, prompting the team to move on from Showalter and Duquette following the season's conclusion. The Orioles' current manager is Brandon Hyde, while Mike Elias serves as general manager and executive vice president.

The Orioles are also well known for their influential ballpark, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, which opened in 1992 in downtown Baltimore.

Derek Jeter

Derek Sanderson Jeter ( JEE-tər; born June 26, 1974) is an American former professional baseball shortstop, businessman, and baseball executive. He has been the chief executive officer (CEO) and part owner of the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB) since September 2017.

As a shortstop, Jeter spent his entire 20-year MLB playing career with the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as one of the primary contributors to the Yankees' success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, baserunning, fielding, and leadership. He is the Yankees' all-time career leader in hits (3,465), doubles (544), games played (2,747), stolen bases (358), times on base (4,716), plate appearances (12,602) and at bats (11,195). His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter was the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career ranked sixth in MLB history in career hits and first among shortstops. In 2017, the Yankees retired his uniform number 2.

The Yankees drafted Jeter out of high school in 1992, and he debuted in the major leagues at age 21 in 1995. The following year, he became the Yankees' starting shortstop, won the Rookie of the Year Award, and helped push the team to win the 1996 World Series. Jeter continued to play during the team's championship seasons of 1998–2000; he finished third in voting for the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1998, recorded multiple career-high numbers in 1999, and won both the All-Star Game MVP and World Series MVP Awards in 2000. He consistently placed among the AL leaders in hits and runs scored for most of his career, and served as the Yankees' team captain from 2003 until his retirement in 2014. Throughout his career, Jeter contributed reliably to the Yankees' franchise successes. He holds many postseason records, and has a .321 batting average in the World Series. Jeter has earned the nicknames "Captain Clutch" and "Mr. November" due to his outstanding play in the postseason.

Jeter was one of the most heavily marketed athletes of his generation and is involved in numerous product endorsements. As a celebrity, his personal life and relationships with other celebrities has drawn the attention of the media.

Interference (baseball)

In baseball, interference occurs in situations in which a person illegally changes the course of play from what is expected. Interference might be committed by players on the offense, players not currently in the game, catchers, umpires, or spectators. Each type of interference is covered differently by the rules.

Larry Barnett

Lawrence Robert Barnett (born January 3, 1945) is a former umpire in Major League Baseball who worked in the American League from 1969 to 1999 before becoming the major leagues' supervisor of umpires from 2000 to 2001. He is perhaps well remembered for a controversial call in Game 3 of the 1975 World Series while working home plate in the 10th inning that led to the Reds winning the game. He was also the home plate umpire for the infamous Jeffrey Maier game, but did not have anything to do with the controversy.

List of events at Yankee Stadium (1923)

Yankee Stadium was a stadium that opened in 1923 and closed in 2008. It was primarily the home field of the New York Yankees professional baseball club for over eight decades, but it also hosted football games, boxing matches, live concerts, and Papal visits in its 85 years of existence.

Maier

Maier is a surname of German origin. It is a variant spelling of the more usual "Meyer", which is cognate with the English word "mayor".

Bernhard Maier (born 1963), German professor of religious studies

Fred Anton Maier (1938-2015), Norwegian speed skater

Jeffrey Maier (born 1984), 1996 World Series baseball fan

Johann Maier von Eck (1486–1543), German Catholic theologian

Jonathan Maier (born 1992), German basketball player

Henry W. Maier (1918–1994), American politician

Hermann Maier (born 1972), Austrian alpine skier

Merwyn Maier (1909–1942), American bridge player

Norman Maier (1900-1977), American experimental psychologist

Michael Maier (1568–1622), German physician, counselor, alchemist and epigramist

Paul Maier (born 1930), American history professor and novelist

Pauline Maier (1938–2013), American history professor

Rudolf Robert Maier 1824–1888), German pathologist

Sascha Maier (born 1974), retired German footballer

Sepp Maier (born 1944), retired German football goalkeeper

Vivian Maier (1926–2009), amateur photographer

Werner L. Maier (born 1966), retired German football player

William J. Maier (1876–1941), New York State politician

Marion, Ohio

Marion is a city in and the county seat of Marion County, Ohio, United States. The municipality is located in north-central Ohio, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus.

The population was 36,837 at the 2010 census, and is estimated to be 36,000 in 2018. According to the US Census 2017 estimate Ohio's Columbus–Marion–Chillicothe Combined Statistical Area has 2,481,525 people. Marion is the county's largest city and the center of the Marion Micropolitan Statistical Area (as defined by the United States Census Bureau in 2003). President Warren G. Harding, a former owner of the Marion Star, was a resident of Marion for much of his adult life.The city and its development were closely related to industrialist Edward Huber and his extensive business interests. The city is home to several historic properties, some listed on the National Register of Historic Places listings in Marion County, Ohio.

Marion currently styles itself as America's Workforce Development Capital™ given growing public private educational partnerships and the multitude and coordination of educational venues, from four and two year college programs to vocational and technical training and skill certification programs.The mayor of Marion is Scott Schertzer.

New York Yankees

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City; the other club is the National League (NL)'s New York Mets. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles (no relation to the modern Baltimore Orioles). Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise that had ceased operations and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.The team is owned by Yankee Global Enterprises, an LLC that is controlled by the family of the late George Steinbrenner, who purchased the team in 1973. Brian Cashman is the team's general manager, and Aaron Boone is the team's field manager. The team's home games were played at the original Yankee Stadium from 1923 to 1973 and from 1976 to 2008. In 1974 and 1975, the Yankees shared Shea Stadium with the Mets, in addition to the New York Jets, and New York Giants. In 2009, they moved into a new ballpark of the same name that was constructed next door to the previous facility, which was closed and demolished. The team is perennially among the leaders in MLB attendance.

The Yankees are arguably the most successful professional sports team in the United States; they have won 40 AL pennants, and 27 World Series championships, all of which are MLB records. The Yankees have won more titles than any other franchise in the four major North American sports leagues. Forty-four Yankees players and eleven Yankees managers have been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, including Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, and Whitey Ford. In pursuit of winning championships, the franchise has used a large payroll to attract talent, particularly during the Steinbrenner era. According to Forbes, the Yankees are the second highest valued sports franchise in the United States and the second in the world, with an estimated value of approximately $4 billion. The Yankees have garnered enormous popularity and a dedicated fanbase, as well as widespread enmity from fans of other MLB teams. The team's rivalry with the Boston Red Sox is one of the most well-known rivalries in U.S. sports.

From 1903–2018, the Yankees' overall win-loss record is 10,275–7,781 (a .569 winning percentage).

Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan

Northern Valley Regional High School at Old Tappan is a comprehensive four-year public high school serving students in ninth through twelfth grades from the suburban communities of Harrington Park, Northvale, Norwood and Old Tappan in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. Students from Rockleigh attend the high school as part of a sending/receiving relationship. The school joins Northern Valley Regional High School at Demarest as the two secondary schools that are part of the Northern Valley Regional High School District, which also serves students from Closter, Demarest and Haworth.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 1,258 students and 103.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.1:1. There were 3 students (0.2% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and none eligible for reduced-cost lunch.The high school is overseen by the New Jersey Department of Education and has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1965.

Old-Timers' Day

Old-Timers' Day (or Old-Timers' Game) generally refers to a tradition in Major League Baseball whereby a team, most prominently the New York Yankees, devotes the early afternoon preceding a weekend game to celebrate the baseball-related accomplishments of its former players who have since retired. The pattern has been copied intermittently by other sports but has failed to catch on.

Rich Garcia

Richard Raul Garcia (born May 22, 1942) is a former umpire in Major League Baseball (MLB) who worked in the American League (AL) from 1975 to 1999. Garcia wore uniform number 19 when the AL adopted numbers for its umpires in 1980.

Steve Bartman incident

The Steve Bartman incident was a controversial play that occurred during a baseball game between the Chicago Cubs and the Florida Marlins on October 14, 2003, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois, during Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2003 postseason.

The incident occurred in the eighth inning of Game 6 of the National League Championship Series (NLCS), with Chicago leading 3–0 and holding a three games to two lead in the best-of-seven series. Marlins batter Luis Castillo hit a fly ball into foul territory in left field. Cubs outfielder Moisés Alou pursued the ball and leapt near the fence in an attempt to make the catch. Along with other spectators seated against the wall, Cubs fan Steve Bartman reached for the ball, but he deflected it, disrupting Alou's potential catch. If Alou had caught the ball, it would have been the second out in the inning, and the Cubs would have been just four outs away from winning their first National League pennant since 1945. The Cubs ultimately allowed eight runs in the inning, and lost the game 8–3. When they were eliminated in Game 7 the next day, the incident was seen as the "first domino" to fall in affecting the series's outcome.In the moments following the play, Cubs fans shouted insults and threw debris at Bartman. For his safety, security was forced to escort him from the ballpark. Minutes after the game, his name and personal information were published online, necessitating police protection at his home. He faced further harassment from fans and the media after the Cubs' loss in the series, as he was scapegoated for the continuation of the team's then 95-year championship drought. Bartman apologized for the incident and stated his desire to move past it and return to a quiet life. Many Cubs players came to his defense, emphasizing that their performance was to blame for their loss.

In 2011, ESPN produced a documentary film exploring the subject as part of its 30 for 30 series. Titled Catching Hell, the film drew comparisons between the Bartman incident and Bill Buckner's fielding error late in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series, and explored the incident from different perspectives. In an effort to reconcile with Bartman and put the incident behind them, the Chicago Cubs awarded him a championship ring after their victory in the 2016 World Series.

Tony Tarasco

Anthony Giacinto Tarasco (born December 9, 1970) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder for the Atlanta Braves, Montreal Expos, Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Reds, and New York Yankees between 1993 and 1999 and for the New York Mets in 2002. He also played with the Hanshin Tigers in the Japanese Central League in 2000. He is currently the manager of the Class A-Advanced Lake Elsinore Storm.

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