Jefferson's Birthday

Jefferson's Birthday officially honors the birth of the third U.S. president, Thomas Jefferson on April 13, 1743. This day was recognized by Franklin D. Roosevelt as part of Presidential Proclamation 2276, issued on March 21, 1938.[1]

More recently, President George W. Bush issued proclamation 8124 on April 11, 2007, stating that "... on Thomas Jefferson Day, we commemorate the birthday of a monumental figure whose place in our Nation’s history will always be cherished".[2]

Jefferson's Birthday
Gilbert Stuart Thomas Jefferson
Observed byUnited States
DateApril 13
Next timeApril 13, 2020
Frequencyannual

References

  1. ^ Thomas Jefferson Day Pub Res No 60 of August 16, 1937
  2. ^ Proclamation 8124 of April 11, 2007

3. Birth of Thomas Jefferson [1]

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/thomas-jefferson-is-born

  1. ^ http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/thomas-jefferson-is-born
American Family Day

American Family Day is the 14th state-recognized holiday in Arizona, Title 1-301. American Family Day, much like Mothers Day or Father's Day is a non-paid holiday established as a separate day to appreciate family members by spending time with them. Families are discouraged from buying gifts or other material items.

Arizona resident, John Makkai, is credited with pushing the holiday through the Arizona legislation. American Family Day began as a 1-year proclamation, signed by then Governor Raúl Héctor Castro, declaring August 7, 1977 American Family Day. The following year, American Family Day was signed into law as an official Arizona holiday by Governor Bruce Babbitt. The holiday also caught on in several other states, including North Carolina and Georgia.

From the Georgia Department of Education Parent Engagement Program, "American Family Day- this day brings families together to share their love and appreciation of one another."

Charles Pinckney Jones

Charles Pinckney Jones (September 17, 1845 – February 22, 1914) was an American soldier and politician.

Jones was born in Franklin, Pendleton County, (now West) Virginia. He enlisted in the Confederate States Army. He served as a Private in the 18th Virginia Cavalry; and according to the Fort Stevens Confederate order of battle the unit was assigned to Imboden's and W.L. Jackson's Brigade participating in the Gettysburg Campaign, skirmishing the Federals in western Virginia. Later the cavalry served in the Shenandoah Valley before disbanding in April, 1865. He attended the University of Virginia Law School graduating with distinction in 1868. He established a law practice in Monterey, Virginia. On January 17, 1872, he married Martha Jane Wilson, great-great-great granddaughter of Colonel John Wilson, a longtime member of the Virginia House of Burgesses until his death in 1773.

Jones was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates in 1883. In 1885 he was elected to the Virginia State Senate, serving the counties of Highland, Bath and Allegheny until 1897. From 1898 to 1906, he was a member of the Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia and in that first year was elected by the board to be the Rector of the University. He was the last Rector to serve the university before they adopted the presidential system for the school. The first president of the University, Edwin A. Alderman was informally installed as President September 15, 1904. Charles P. Jones formally inducted the new president at a ceremony on Thomas Jefferson's birthday anniversary, April 13, 1905 He died in Monterey, Virginia.

The C.P. Jones House and Law Office at Monterey was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

Cullen–Harrison Act

The Cullen–Harrison Act, named for its sponsors, Senator Pat Harrison and Representative Thomas H. Cullen, enacted by the United States Congress on March 21, 1933 and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt the following day, legalized the sale in the United States of beer with an alcohol content of 3.2% (by weight) and wine of similarly low alcohol content, thought to be too low to be intoxicating, effective April 7, 1933. Upon signing the legislation, Roosevelt made his famous remark, "I think this would be a good time for a beer."According to the Cullen–Harrison Act, states had to pass their own similar legislation to legalize sale of the low alcohol beverages within their borders. Roosevelt had previously sent a short message to Congress requesting such a bill. Sale of even low alcohol beer had been illegal in the U.S. since Prohibition started in 1920 following the 1919 passage of the Volstead Act. Throngs gathered outside breweries and taverns to celebrate the return of 3.2 beer. The passage of the Cullen–Harrison Act is celebrated as National Beer Day every year on April 7 in the United States.

Eleanor Roosevelt Seagraves

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Seagraves (née Dall, born March 25, 1927, in New York City) is an American librarian, educator, historian, and editor. She is a granddaughter of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Her parents are Anna Roosevelt Dall and her first husband Curtis Bean Dall. She is usually known as "Sistie", "Ellie" or "Eleanor".

Fred Korematsu Day

The Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution is celebrated on January 30 in California to commemorate the birthday of Fred Korematsu, a Japanese-American civil rights activist (see Korematsu v. US). It is the first day in U.S. history named after an Asian American. It was signed into law by then-California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger on September 23, 2010.The day was first commemorated in 2011 at the University of California, Berkeley, as a day recognizing American civil liberties and rights under the Constitution of the United States. Educational materials were also distributed to school teachers for classroom use.The states of Hawaii (2013), Virginia (2015), and Florida (2016) have since followed suit and passed legislative bills recognizing Fred Korematsu Day in perpetuity.

Fred Korematsu Day was also celebrated in Illinois in 2014, but it isn't clear whether then-Gov. Pat Quinn's proclamation extended past the year. Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Utah have submitted resolutions honoring the day, and South Carolina has submitted a bill to their legislature.Google recognized Fred Korematsu Day in 2017 with a Google Doodle by artist Sophie Diao, featuring a patriotic portrait of Korematsu wearing his Presidential Medal of Freedom, a scene of the internment camps to his back, surrounded by cherry blossoms, flowers that have come to be symbols of peace and friendship between the US and Japan.

James Roosevelt Roosevelt

James Roosevelt "Rosy" Roosevelt (April 27, 1854 – May 7, 1927) was an American diplomat, heir, and the older half-brother of 32nd President of the United States Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Lee–Jackson Day

Lee–Jackson Day is a legal holiday celebrated in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the U.S., for the birthdays of Confederate generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. The original holiday, created in 1889, celebrated Lee's birthday on January 19th. Jackson's name was added to the holiday in 1904; his birthday was January 21st.

In 1983, the holiday was merged with the new Federal holiday, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, as Lee–Jackson–King Day in Virginia. This merger was reversed in 2000.

Lee–Jackson Day is currently observed on the Friday that immediately precedes Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (the third Monday in January). Typical events include a wreath-laying ceremony with military honors, a Civil War themed parade, symposia, and a gala ball. State offices are closed for both holidays.Many Virginia cities, such as Charlottesville, Fairfax, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Richmond, and Winchester, choose not to observe Lee–Jackson Day. In 2017, the Town of Blacksburg decided to stop observing the day as well.

National Aviation Day

The National Aviation Day (August 19) is a United States national observation that celebrates the development of aviation.

The holiday was established in 1939 by Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who issued a presidential proclamation which designated the anniversary of Orville Wright's birthday to be National Aviation Day (Mr. Wright, born in 1871, was still alive when the proclamation was first issued, and would live another nine years). The proclamation was codified (USC 36:I:A:1:118), and it allows the sitting US President to proclaim August 19 as National Aviation Day each year, if desired. Their proclamation may direct all federal buildings and installations to fly the US flag on that day, and may encourage citizens to observe the day with activities that promote interest in aviation.

National Freedom Day

National Freedom Day is a United States observance on February 1 honoring the signing by Abraham Lincoln of a joint House and Senate resolution that later became the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. President Lincoln signed the Amendment outlawing slavery on February 1, 1865, although it was not ratified by the states until later.

National Hispanic Heritage Month

National Hispanic Heritage Month is the period from September 15 to October 15 in the United States, when people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the group's heritage and culture.

Office of Production Management

The Office of Production Management was a United States Government agency that existed from January 1941 to centralize direction of federal procurement programs and quasi-war production during the period immediately proceeding the United States' involvement in World War II. After the United States formally entered World War II, the War Production Board superseded the Office of Production Management in January 1942 and the office ceased to exist shortly thereafter. It was established and distestablished by Executive Order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Patriots' Day

Patriots' Day (so punctuated in several U.S. states, but Patriot's Day in Maine) is an annual event, formalized as several state holidays, commemorating the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and the Battle of Menotomy, the first battles of the American Revolutionary War.

Robert E. Lee Day

Robert E. Lee Day, also called Lee's Birthday, is a public holiday commemorating the birth of Robert E. Lee, observed each year on the third Monday in January. Because Lee was the General in Chief of the Armies of the Confederacy, it is mainly observed in the U.S. South, particularly in Alabama and Mississippi.Although Lee's actual January 19 birthdate remains a legal holiday in the Florida statute books, by and large it is not observed. In Alabama and Mississippi, it is celebrated together with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Arkansas combined the observance of Robert E. Lee Day with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in 1985, after two years of requiring state employees to select between the two holidays or their own birthday as a day off from work. In 2017, it passed a law removing General Lee's name from the January holiday and instead establishing a state memorial day on the second Saturday of October in honor of Lee.

Roosevelt Institute

The Roosevelt Institute is a liberal American think tank. According to the organization, it exists "to carry forward the legacy and values of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt by developing progressive ideas and bold leadership in the service of restoring America’s promise of opportunity for all." It is headquartered in New York, New York.

Something Else Press

Something Else Press was founded by Dick Higgins in 1963. It published many important Intermedia texts and artworks by such Fluxus artists as Higgins, Ray Johnson, Alison Knowles, Allan Kaprow, George Brecht, Daniel Spoerri, Robert Filliou, Al Hansen, John Cage, Emmett Williams and by such important modernist figures as Gertrude Stein, Henry Cowell, and Bern Porter.

Thomas Jefferson (University of Virginia)

Thomas Jefferson is a statue of Thomas Jefferson in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia.

In August 2017 the statue was the target of graffiti vandalism.In September 2017 the statue was the target of protest in the context of the Charlottesville historic monument controversy and the recent Unite the Right rally. Protesters accused Jefferson of being racist and a rapist. They covered the statue of Jefferson in a way similar to how the city had recently covered the Jackson and Robert E. Lee sculptures. Among the protesters was one person with a gun whom the police arrested for public intoxication.University of Virginia president Teresa A. Sullivan later responded by calling for civil discourse.On Friday 13 April 2018 someone vandalized the statue with graffiti which read "rapist" and "racist". This day was Founder's Day, a holiday to celebrate Thomas Jefferson's birthday.

Women's Equality Day

Women's Equality Day is celebrated in the United States on August 26 to commemorate the 1920 adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution, which prohibits the states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex. It was first celebrated in 1973 and is proclaimed each year by the United States President.

Wright Brothers Day

Wright Brothers Day (December 17) is a United States national observation. It is codified in the US Code, and commemorates the first successful flights in a heavier-than-air, mechanically propelled airplane, that were made by Orville and Wilbur Wright on December 17, 1903, near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. On September 24, 1959 U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower declared December 17 to be Wright Brothers Day.Wright Brothers Day was announced as an official commemorative day in Ohio, on October 5, 2011, celebrating 100 years of practical flight for the Wright Brothers.

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