Jeff Torborg

Jeffrey Allen Torborg (born November 26, 1941) is a former catcher and manager in Major League Baseball. Torborg was signed by the Los Angeles Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1963. On September 9, 1965, Torborg caught Sandy Koufax's perfect game. On July 20, 1970, he was the catcher receiving Bill Singer's no-hitter,[1][2] and on May 15, 1973, Torborg also caught the first of Nolan Ryan's seven no-hitters.

Jeff Torborg
Jeff Torborg Yankees postcard (cropped)
Torborg with the Yankees in 1982
Catcher / Manager
Born: November 26, 1941 (age 77)
Plainfield, New Jersey
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 10, 1964, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1973, for the California Angels
MLB statistics
Batting average.214
Home runs8
Runs batted in101
Managerial record634–718
Winning %.469
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards
Jeff Torborg with the Dodgers, 1964 (cropped)
Torborg with the Dodgers in 1964

College

Torborg grew up in Westfield, New Jersey, where he was the catcher on the Westfield High School baseball team.[3] He caught at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He was a 1963 All-American, setting the school record for season batting average; his .537 batting average was the highest for 100 at-bats and under. His .537 average was the highest ever recorded up to that time and since then, only two college players have hit for a better average. His slugging percentage that year (1.032) is also a single-season standard. He led the team with 21 RBI and six home runs. In his three-year career from 1961–63, the Torborg batted .390. His number (#10) was retired in 1992. He still holds the career slugging percentage mark of .684. During his career, the Knights were 15–4–1, 14–4 and 11–5 for a three-year mark of 40–13–1 (.741 winning percentage).

Coaching, managing, and broadcasting career

After a successful ten-year career as a catcher with the Dodgers and Angels, Torborg switched to coaching. In 1977, he became the manager of the Cleveland Indians (a position he held for three years). He was a coach on the Yankees from 1979 to 1988. In 1989, Torborg left the Yankees to become the manager of the Chicago White Sox. A year after he took the helm, the White Sox won 94 games, which was a 25-game improvement from the team's 1989 season. For his efforts with the 1990 White Sox, Torborg won the American League Manager of the Year Award. Torborg would stay with the White Sox for one more year before moving to the New York Mets.

Torborg wasn't as successful with the Mets as he was with the White Sox. A year after leading the White Sox to an 87–75 record, Torborg's 1992 New York Mets posted a 70–92 record. After starting the 1993 season with a 13–25 record, the Mets fired Torborg and replaced him with Dallas Green.

For the rest of the 1990s, Torborg kept busy working as a sportscaster for the likes of CBS Radio and Fox. Torborg returned to managing, first with the Montreal Expos in 2001 and then the Florida Marlins in 2002.

In 2003, Torborg was fired from the Florida Marlins after they started off the season with a 16–22 record. Jack McKeon was hired to replace him and led the team to a 2003 World Series victory. Torborg then returned to broadcasting for Fox. He served as the color commentator for Atlanta Braves games on FSN South and Turner South in 2006, where he was partnered with Bob Rathbun. However, neither Torborg nor Rathbun was retained for the 2007 season.[4]

Managerial record

Team From To Regular season record Post–season record
G W L Win % G W L Win %
Cleveland Indians 1977 1979 358 157 201 .439
Chicago White Sox 1989 1991 485 250 235 .515
New York Mets 1992 1993 200 85 115 .425
Montreal Expos 2001 2001 109 47 62 .431
Florida Marlins 2002 2003 200 95 105 .475
Total 1352 634 718 .469
Ref.:[5]

Personal life

Torborg is of Danish descent. His son, Dale, is a former professional wrestler and his daughter-in-law, Christie Wolf, is a bodybuilder and former professional wrestler.

For more than 25 years, Torborg lived with his family in a home in Mountainside, New Jersey.[6]

Torborg currently has Parkinson's and no longer signs autographs.[7]

References

  1. ^ "Jeff Torborg". baseballlibrary.com. Archived from the original on October 13, 2007. Retrieved July 1, 2009.
  2. ^ "Baseball Slate – May 2008 – Most No-Hitters Caught (As of 5–19–08)". Archived from the original on May 22, 2008.
  3. ^ Merkin, Scott. "Ozzie takes fine in stride" Archived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Major League Baseball, May 30, 2010. Accessed March 5, 2011. "Torborg was a three-year starting catcher at Westfield High School and an All-American at Rutgers."
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ "Jeff Torborg". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference. Archived from the original on May 6, 2018. Retrieved April 28, 2017.
  6. ^ Vecsey, George. "Sports of The Times; Torborgs Aren't Selling The House" Archived August 26, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, The New York Times, October 12, 1991. Accessed August 15, 2016. "They built the house. Well, not with their own hands, but they had it built for them, and that is nearly the same thing, after 26 years.... The home in Mountainside is not far from Westfield, the New Jersey town where Jeff Torborg was born."
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved December 6, 2015.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

1971 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1971 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season in second place in the National League West.

1972 California Angels season

The 1972 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing 5th in the American League West with a record of 75 wins and 80 losses.

1990 Chicago White Sox season

The 1990 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 91st season. They finished with a record 94-68, good enough for 2nd place in the American League West, 9 games behind of the 1st place Oakland Athletics, as the White Sox played their final season at Comiskey Park before moving to the new Comiskey Park the next season.

1992 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 1992 season was the 31st regular season for the Mets. The Mets entered the season attempting to improve on their 1991 season, where due in part to a second half collapse they finished 78-84 and recorded their first losing record since 1983. All 81 of the Mets' home games were played at Shea Stadium.

1993 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 1993 season was the 32nd regular season for the Mets. The team sought to improve on its 72-90 mark from 1992. Instead, the Mets slid back and for the first time since 1967 lost 100 games. The Mets finished with a 59-103 record, their fifth worst in history, and finished last place in the NL East. They played all of their home games at Shea Stadium. As of 2018, this was the most recent 100-loss season for the Mets.

2002 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 2002 season was the tenth season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 2001. Their manager was Jeff Torborg. They played home games at Pro Player Stadium. They finished with a record of 79-83, 4th in the NL East.

College World Series on CBS

From 1988-2002, CBS Sports televised a portion of the annual College World Series.

Dale Torborg

Dale Christian Torborg (born October 24, 1971) is an American baseball trainer and former professional wrestler. He is the son of former Major League Baseball manager Jeff Torborg. He is currently the conditioning coordinator for the Chicago White Sox.

Glen Rosenbaum

Glen Otis Rosenbaum (born June 14, 1936) is an American former professional baseball player, coach, and front-office official who spent four decades as a member of the Chicago White Sox organization. He was born in Union Mills, Indiana.

A 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m), 180 lb (82 kg) right-handed pitcher in his playing days, he had an 11-season (1955–1965) active career in the ChiSox' farm system, winning 95 of 140 decisions (.679) but never reaching the Major League level.

In 1968, he became the team's batting practice pitcher, and was promoted to a full-time coaching position on manager Chuck Tanner's staff on August 14, 1973, serving through 1975. After serving strictly as a batting practice pitcher for another ten seasons, Rosenbaum rejoined the White Sox' coaching staff in 1986, and was an aide to managers Jim Fregosi and Jeff Torborg through 1989.He then was the club's traveling secretary until his retirement after the 1998 season.

List of College World Series broadcasters

Through 1987, the College World Series was a pure double-elimination event. The format was changed in 1988, when the tournament was divided into two four-team double-elimination brackets, with the survivors of each bracket playing in a single championship game. The single-game championship was designed for network television, with the final game on CBS on Saturday afternoon.

In 2003, the tournament returned entirely to cable television on ESPN, which had been covering all of the other games of the CWS since 1982 (and a partial schedule since 1980). The championship final became a best-of-three series between the two bracket winners, with games scheduled for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday evenings. In the results shown here, Score indicates the score of the championship game(s) only.

The following is a list of the American television networks and announcers that have broadcast the College World Series.

List of Miami Marlins managers

The Miami Marlins are a professional Major League Baseball based in Miami, Florida. The Marlins are members of the National League East division in MLB, joining in 1993 as an expansion team. In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. The Marlins have employed 12 different managers since their founding as the Florida Marlins in 1993.

The Marlins' first manager was Rene Lachemann, who led the team from its creation in 1993 through part of the 1996 season. He has the most losses in franchise history with 285, and has the lowest winning percentage, with .437. After Cookie Rojas managed for one game, John Boles served as manager for the final 75 games of the 1996 season. Jim Leyland took over the franchise for the next two seasons, and in the process led the Marlins to their first World Series championship in 1997. In 1999, Boles took over and started his second stint as manager of the Marlins, which lasted until partway through the 2001 season. Tony Pérez was interim manager for the rest of 2001; Pérez is the only Miami Marlins manager who is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, inducted as a player in 2000.Jeff Torborg took over as manager to start the 2002 season, and served for ​1 1⁄2 seasons. Jack McKeon took over and guided the franchise to their second World Series championship in 2003. He served until the end of the 2005 season, and was replaced by Joe Girardi, who was manager for one full season, in 2006. Fredi González took over from Girardi and managed the team from 2007 until partway through 2010; he is the current franchise leader in games managed (555) . Edwin Rodríguez managed the Marlins from 2010 to 2011, and after Brandon Hyde managed for one game, McKeon returned for a second stint as manager. After McKeon retired, Ozzie Guillén took over as manager of the Marlins for the 2012 season, the team's first as the Miami Marlins. Ozzie Guillén was fired on October 23, 2012 after finishing in last place.

List of New York Yankees coaches

The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in New York City, New York in the borough of The Bronx. The Yankees are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Yankees have won the World Series 27 times, more than any other MLB team.In baseball, coaches serve as assistants to the manager. In the past, coaches did not serve in specific roles, as noted in the position titles, such as "first assistant." The number of coaches on a team's staff has increased over the years, and coaching evolved so that individual coaches took on specific roles. Base coaches also serve as infield, outfield, and base-running instructors. Teams also have a pitching coach, hitting coach, and bullpen coach, who often works with the catchers. The bench coach, a newer role on the coaching staff, serves as a second-in-command, advising the manager during the game.Many Yankees coaches are former players, former managers or future managers.

Major League Baseball on CBS Radio

Major League Baseball on CBS Radio was the de facto title for the CBS Radio Network's coverage of Major League Baseball. Produced by CBS Radio Sports, the program was the official national radio broadcaster for the All-Star Game and the postseason (including the World Series) from 1976 to 1997.

Miami Marlins

The Miami Marlins are an American professional baseball team based in Miami, Florida. They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. Their home park is Marlins Park. Though one of only two MLB franchises to have never won a division title (the other is the Colorado Rockies), the Marlins have won two World Series championships as a wild card team.

The team began play as an expansion team in the 1993 season as the Florida Marlins and played home games from their inaugural season to the 2012 season at what was originally called Joe Robbie Stadium, which they shared with the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). Since the 2012 season, they have played at Marlins Park in downtown Miami, on the site of the former Orange Bowl. The new park, unlike their previous home (which was criticized in its baseball configuration for poor sight lines in some locations), was designed foremost as a baseball park. Per an agreement with the city and Miami-Dade County (which owns the park), the Marlins officially changed their name to the "Miami Marlins" on November 11, 2011. They also adopted a new logo, color scheme, and uniforms.The Marlins have the distinction of winning a World Series championship in both seasons they qualified for the postseason, doing so in 1997 and 2003—both times as the National League wild card team, making them the only franchise in the major four North American professional sports leagues (MLB, NBA, NFL, NHL) to have never lost a playoff round. They defeated the American League (AL) champion Cleveland Indians in the 1997 World Series, with shortstop Édgar Rentería driving in second baseman Craig Counsell for the series-clinching run in the 11th inning of the seventh and deciding game. In the 2003 season, manager Jeff Torborg was fired after 38 games. The Marlins were in last place in the NL East with a 16–22 record at the time. Torborg's successor, 72-year-old Jack McKeon, led them to the NL wild card berth in the postseason; they defeated the New York Yankees four games to two in the 2003 World Series.

Sandy Koufax's perfect game

Sandy Koufax of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitched a perfect game in the National League against the Chicago Cubs at Dodger Stadium on September 9, 1965. Koufax, by retiring 27 consecutive batters without allowing any to reach base, became the sixth pitcher of the modern era, eighth overall, to throw a perfect game. The game was Koufax's fourth no-hitter, breaking Bob Feller's Major League record of three (and later broken by Nolan Ryan, in 1981). Koufax struck out 14 opposing batters, the most ever recorded in a perfect game, and matched only by San Francisco Giants pitcher, Matt Cain, on June 13, 2012. He also struck out at least one batter in all nine innings (Cain did not strike out a batter in the ninth in his perfect game), the only perfect game pitcher to do so to date.

The game was also notable for the high quality of the performance by the opposing pitcher, Bob Hendley of the Cubs. Hendley gave up only one hit (which did not figure into the scoring) and allowed only two baserunners. Both pitchers had no-hitters intact until the seventh inning. The only run that the Dodgers scored was unearned. The game holds the record for fewest base runners in a perfect game (both teams), with two; the next lowest total is four.

Koufax's perfect game is a memorable part of baseball lore. Jane Leavy's biography of Koufax is structured around a re-telling of the game. An article in Salon.com honoring Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully focuses on his play-by-play call of the game for KFI radio. This game was selected in a 1995 poll of members of the Society for American Baseball Research as the greatest game ever pitched.

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