Jeff Kent

Jeffrey Franklin Kent (born March 7, 1968) is an American former professional baseball second baseman. He played seventeen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1992 to 2008 for the Toronto Blue Jays, New York Mets, Cleveland Indians, San Francisco Giants, Houston Astros, and Los Angeles Dodgers.

Kent won the National League Most Valuable Player award in 2000 with the San Francisco Giants, and is the all-time leader in home runs among second basemen.[1] He drove in 90 or more runs from 1997 to 2005, a streak of run production for a second baseman which is a position typically known for its defense.[1][2] Kent is a five-time All-Star, and his 560 career doubles put him tied for 21st on the all-time doubles list.[1][3]

Jeff Kent
Kent-crop
Kent with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 2008
Second baseman
Born: March 7, 1968 (age 51)
Bellflower, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 12, 1992, for the Toronto Blue Jays
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 2008, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
Batting average.290
Hits2,461
Home runs377
Runs batted in1,518
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Toronto Blue Jays

Born in Bellflower, California, Kent graduated from Edison High School in Huntington Beach, California, where he was kicked off the baseball team after clashing with his coach over a position change.[4] Kent played at UC Berkeley prior to being drafted in the 20th round of the 1989 amateur draft by the Toronto Blue Jays.

After four seasons in the minor leagues, Kent was invited to spring training with the Toronto Blue Jays in 1992 and made the opening day roster. He made his debut on April 12 against the Baltimore Orioles and recorded his first career hit (a double) in the 6th inning against José Mesa. He hit his first home run on April 14 against New York Yankees pitcher Lee Guetterman. He saw limited at-bats early in the season; however, an injury to starting third baseman Kelly Gruber granted Kent a more regular role in the line-up.

Kent was traded to the Mets on August 27, 1992, for pitcher David Cone, as Toronto bolstered their pitching rotation for a successful World Series run.

New York Mets

Kent's time with the Mets was marked with some success and some failure. Although he batted well, particularly for a second baseman, the Mets were among the worst teams in the National League. Furthermore, he acquired a very poor reputation in the clubhouse, where he was known for a quick temper and isolationism. He refused to participate in his hazing ritual with the Mets, feeling he had left his rookie status back in Toronto. During the 1992 season, he started the only game of his career at shortstop in order to allow Willie Randolph to play his final career game at second base.

Cleveland Indians

In a deal made prior to the 1996 trade deadline, the Mets infamously sent Kent and José Vizcaíno to the Cleveland Indians for Álvaro Espinoza and Carlos Baerga. The following offseason, Kent was again traded, this time to the San Francisco Giants along with José Vizcaíno and Julián Tavárez. The San Francisco trade was initially very unpopular, as it sent Matt Williams, a longtime Giant and a fan-favorite, to the Indians. Brian Sabean, in his first year as general manager of the Giants, was so widely criticized for the move that he famously defended himself to the media by saying, "I am not an idiot."

San Francisco Giants

Kent's career took off in San Francisco, starting in 1997. Immediately inserted in the line-up behind superstar Barry Bonds, and with the confidence of manager Dusty Baker, Kent finally rose to his full potential, hitting .250 with 29 home runs and 121 RBI.[5] He was consistently among the top RBI hitters in the league over his next five seasons with the Giants, amassing 689 RBI over six years. He also won the 1998 Willie Mac Award for his spirit and leadership.

Kent's contributions were recognized in 2000 (33 HR, 125 RBI, .334 BA, and a .986 fielding percentage)[5] with the National League MVP Award, beating out teammate and perennial MVP candidate Barry Bonds. Despite the fact that Bonds overshadowed Kent in almost every offensive category, it was Kent's clutch hitting in RBI spots that won many games for the Giants that year, and ultimately won him the award. The Giants finished first in the NL West at 97–65, but lost to the Mets in the National League Division Series 3–1.[6]

In 2002, Kent had another stellar year for a second baseman (37 HR, 108 RBI, .313 BA, and a .978 fielding percentage).[5] The combination of Kent and MVP-winner Bonds propelled the Giants to a 95–66 record, good enough for the NL Wild Card. The Giants would beat the Atlanta Braves in the National League Division Series 3–2 and the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series 4–1. In the World Series for the first time since 1989, the Giants would nearly clinch the championship (failing to hold a 5–0, 7th-inning lead) in the sixth game, before falling to the Anaheim Angels in seven games.[7]

Despite the team's success that season, Kent's relationship with the Giants had soured. The Giants front office had lost confidence in Kent after an incident during spring training left him with a broken wrist. Kent had initially claimed that the wrist was broken while washing his truck; ensuing media reports indicated that Kent had crashed his motorcycle while performing wheelies and other stunts, in direct violation of his contract.[8]

In addition, growing tension that had been developing between Kent and Bonds for years finally boiled over: a midseason fight in the Giants dugout was widely reported in 2002 and caught on television.[9] The feud between the two was so bad, that at the end of the season, San Francisco Chronicle beat reporter Ray Ratto said of the two, "The one who lives longer will attend the other's funeral, just to make sure he's dead."[10] The departure of manager Dusty Baker also factored into Kent's eventual decision to leave the Giants. Kent signed a two-year, $19.9 million deal with the Houston Astros, citing his desire to be closer to his family's Texas ranch.

Houston Astros

Kent turned one of the outs and collected an assist during a triple play on August 19, 2004, against Philadelphia, when Todd Pratt grounded out with the bases loaded in the fifth inning. Kent forced Marlon Byrd out at second base before throwing Pratt out at first base. It was Houston's first triple play turned in 13 years.[11]

On October 2, 2004, he hit his 288th home run as a second baseman, surpassing Ryne Sandberg as the all-time home run leader at that position.

In possibly his finest moment as an Astro, Kent hit a three-run home run in the bottom of the ninth in Game 5 of the 2004 National League Championship Series to put Houston ahead of the St. Louis Cardinals 3–2 in the series. However, the Cardinals would win games 6 and 7 in St. Louis to capture the pennant.

Los Angeles Dodgers

On December 14, 2004, he signed a $21 million contract for three years with his hometown Los Angeles Dodgers.

Kent had a good 2005 season, leading the Dodgers in batting average, on-base percentage, slugging, runs, hits, doubles, home runs and RBI (.289, .377, .512, 100, 160, 36, 29, and 105 respectively).[12] This was the best year by a Dodger second baseman since Jackie Robinson.

While missing games early on in the 2006 season because of an oblique injury, he came back late in the season and helped the Dodgers reach the postseason.[13]

After the 2005 season, Kent signed an extension that would take him to the 2008 season.[14] Following 2008, Kent announced his retirement from baseball on January 22, 2009.[15]

Life after retirement

Kent and his wife Dana reside near Austin, Texas, where they raise their four children, a daughter and three sons.[16] He also owns the 4,000-acre (1,600 ha) "Diamond K" cattle ranch near Tilden, Texas.[17] In 2008, Kent purchased the Lakecliff Country Club in Spicewood, Texas.[18] Kent also owns Kent Powersports, a chain of motorcycle and ATV dealerships.[19]

Kent appeared as a contestant on the Summer 2009 television series Superstars, where he was teamed with actress Ali Landry in a series of sports competitions. They finished in fifth place in the competition.[20] In 2012, Kent participated in Survivor: Philippines, the twenty-fifth season of the American CBS competitive reality television series Survivor. He was the 8th contestant voted off, which placed him ninth and made him the second member of the jury, giving him a right to vote for the eventual winner at the Final Tribal Council.[21] When he was voted off, Kent claimed that the million dollar prize was "six hundred grand by the time Obama takes it".[22]

He has been an advocate for Major League Baseball using blood tests for HGH.[23] Since 2011, Kent has served as a spring training instructor for the San Francisco Giants.[24] He also coaches his sons' Little League teams, and in 2014 he became a volunteer assistant for Southwestern University's baseball team.[25] In 2011, Kent donated $100,000 and raised awareness to help reinstate the Cal baseball program, which was being cut for cost-saving purposes.[26] In 2014, Kent announced the creation of the Jeff Kent Women Driven Scholarship Endowment to provide a full scholarship each year to one female student-athlete at UC Berkeley in perpetuity.[19][27]

In 2008, he donated to the campaign to ban same-sex marriage in California.[28]

Eligible for the Hall of Fame for the first time in 2014, his chances were felt to be low because of poor defense and the tainted era he played in;[29] indeed, the writers gave Kent just 15.2% of their votes in his first year, well short of the required 75% for induction. In the following 2015 Hall of Fame vote, among the 17 returnees to the ballot, Kent was one of only three who saw a decrease in support, dropping from 15.2% to 14.0%.[30]

Personal life

Kent and his wife, Dana, are a members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. His daughter, Lauren, and his eldest son, Hunter, both attended Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo, Utah. Lauren graduated from BYU in December 2017, and Hunter played on the practice squad for the Cougars, before taking leave to serve a two-year mission in Mexico.[31]

Kent's son, Colton, played his prep baseball at Lake Travis High School, in Austin, Texas. Colton signed to play college baseball at BYU, but transferred to the College of Southern Idaho[32] (CSI) after a year at BYU. Colton is currently (2018-2019 season) a freshman at CSI, starting at the position his dad played throughout his MLB career, 2nd base.[33]

Accomplishments

Jeff Kent MVP 2000
Jeff Kent MVP 2000 autographed baseball
  • 5-time All-Star (1999–2001, 2004–05)[5]
  • 4-time Silver Slugger (2000–2002, 2005)[5]
  • National League MVP (2000)[34]
  • Finished 6th in National League MVP voting (2002)[35]
  • Finished 8th in National League MVP voting (1997)[36]
  • Finished 9th in National League MVP voting (1998)[37]
  • Finished Top-5 in RBIs (1997, 1998, 2000, 2002)
  • All-time leader in home runs as a second baseman (377)[38]
  • Only second baseman to have 100 or more RBIs in 6 consecutive seasons (1997–2002)
  • Hit for the cycle (1999)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Jeff Kent: his numbers will earn him hall of fame consideration Archived September 18, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Kent taking his place among all-time greats
  3. ^ 2007 Career Highlights, MLB Bio
  4. ^ "Trouble as a Prep Doesn't Slow Kent's Rise to Majors : Baseball: Former Edison infielder, who overcame difficult senior season, gets a quick call from Blue Jays". LA Times.
  5. ^ a b c d e Jeff Kent career stats Baseball-Reference.com
  6. ^ 2000 SF Giants Baseball-Reference.com
  7. ^ 2002 SF Giants Baseball-Reference.com
  8. ^ Schulman, Henry. "Story should not have laugh track", San Francisco Chronicle, March 26, 2002, p. C1.
  9. ^ Schulman, Henry. "Giants now battling each other", San Francisco Chronicle, June 26, 2002, p. C1.
  10. ^ Ratto, Ray. "Bonds and Kent, a growing feud". San Francisco Chronicle.
  11. ^ Gelston, Dan (August 19, 2004). "Astros assist fourth win in row with triple play vs. Phils". USA Today. Associated Press. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  12. ^ "2005 Los Angeles Dodgers Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  13. ^ "Maintenance Page". sportsnet.ca. Archived from the original on November 21, 2012. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  14. ^ "Kent signs $11.5 million extension through 2007 – MLB – ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. March 29, 2006. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  15. ^ Second Baseman Jeff Kent retires after 17 major league seasons
  16. ^ "Jeff Kent gets emotional, retires from baseball after 17 seasons". USA Today. The Associated Press. January 23, 2009. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  17. ^ Schulman, Henry (September 12, 2000). "GIANTS CLUBHOUSE / Kent Preparing for the Future". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  18. ^ Habel, Steve. "Two Austin-area Private Clubs Boast Top Layouts". Cybergolf.com. Archived from the original on September 21, 2011.
  19. ^ a b "Kent Announces Women Driven Scholarship Endowment" (Press release). Cal Athletics. September 22, 2014. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  20. ^ TV Guide Superstars page
  21. ^ Ross, Dalton (August 20, 2012). "'Survivor: Philippines': 'Facts of Life' star Lisa Whelchel and baseball MVP Jeff Kent highlight new cast". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved August 20, 2012.
  22. ^ "Former SF Giant Jeff Kent Slams Obama On 'Survivor'". CBS San Francisco. November 8, 2012.
  23. ^ "Kent says he advocates blood tests for players". ESPN. January 12, 2008. Retrieved February 21, 2011.
  24. ^ Schulman, Henry (February 16, 2011). "Jeff Kent joins SF Giants as spring instructor". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  25. ^ Winkler, Adam (February 6, 2014). "Southwestern Baseball "Kent" Get Enough". KEYE-TV. Archived from the original on March 20, 2015. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  26. ^ Baggarly, Andrew (February 26, 2015). "Giants great Kent has connection with third-base prospect". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  27. ^ Saracevic, Al (September 20, 2014). "Jeff Kent, Cal bring light to dark sports landscape". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved March 1, 2015.
  28. ^ http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/washington/2008/10/los-angeles-dod.html
  29. ^ Kent's HOF case CBSSports.com, Retrieved 2013-12-26.
  30. ^ "2015 Hall of Fame Voting". Baseball-Reference.com.
  31. ^ https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900021875/jeff-kents-son-colton-kent-finding-his-own-path-at-byu.html
  32. ^ https://athletics.csi.edu/roster.aspx?rp_id=1617
  33. ^ https://byucougars.com/athlete/baseball/1281494/Colton-Kent
  34. ^ Baseball Awards Voting for 2000 Baseball-Reference.com
  35. ^ Baseball Awards Voting for 2002 Baseball-Reference.com
  36. ^ Baseball Awards Voting for 1997 Baseball-Reference.com
  37. ^ Baseball Awards Voting for 1998 Baseball-Reference.com
  38. ^ Ex-NL MVP Jeff Kent to announce retirement at 40 (AP), Jan. 21, 2009

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Vladimir Guerrero
Todd Helton
Todd Helton
National League Player of the Month
August 1998
June 2000
June 2002
Succeeded by
Mark McGwire
Sammy Sosa
Larry Walker
Preceded by
Tony Eusebio
Houston Astros Longest Hitting Streak
2004–2006
Succeeded by
Willy Taveras
Preceded by
Neifi Pérez
Hitting for the cycle
May 3, 1999
Succeeded by
Todd Helton
1997 San Francisco Giants season

The 1997 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 115th season in Major League Baseball, their 40th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 38th at 3Com Park at Candlestick Point. The Giants finished in first place in the National League West with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. They lost the National League Division Series in three games to the Florida Marlins.

1998 San Francisco Giants season

The 1998 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 116th season in Major League Baseball, their 41st season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 39th at 3Com Park at Candlestick Point. The team finished in second place in the National League West with an 89-74 record, 9½ games behind the San Diego Padres.

2000 San Francisco Giants season

The 2000 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 118th season in Major League Baseball and their 43rd season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season. The Giants finished in first place in the National League West with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. They lost the National League Division Series in four games to the New York Mets.

The team played their first season in newly opened Pacific Bell Park.

2001 San Francisco Giants season

The 2001 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 119th year in Major League Baseball, their 44th year in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their second at Pacific Bell Park. The team finished in second place in the National League West with a 90–72 record, 2 games behind the Arizona Diamondbacks.

2004 National League Championship Series

The 2004 National League Championship Series (NLCS) was a Major League Baseball playoff series played from October 13 to 21 to determine the champion of the National League, between the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals and the wild-card qualifying Houston Astros. This marked the first time in either Major League that two teams from the Central Division met in a Championship Series.

In a series in which all seven games were won by the home team, the Cardinals won 4–3 to advance to the World Series against the American League champion Boston Red Sox. The Red Sox reached their first World Series since 1986, with the Cardinals playing in their first since 1987. While the NLCS was an exciting back-and-forth series, it was overshadowed in media attention by Boston's comeback in the ALCS.

The Cardinals would go on to lose in a sweep to the Boston Red Sox in the World Series in four games.

2005 Los Angeles Dodgers season

In 2005, the Los Angeles Dodgers suffered from a rash of injuries to key players such as closer Éric Gagné, shortstop César Izturis and outfielder J. D. Drew and fell to their second worst record in Los Angeles history, finishing in fourth place in the Western Division of the National League. After the season, manager Jim Tracy and General Manager Paul DePodesta were both fired and the team was torn apart. This was also the last season to be broadcast on KCOP (13).

Anchorage Bucs

The Anchorage Bucs Baseball Club is a college summer baseball team in Anchorage, Alaska. The team has been a member of the Alaska Baseball League since 1981.

They were originally formed in 1980 as an Anchorage Adult League team. Team colors are black and gold. Former players who advanced to the majors include Keith Foulke, Geoff Jenkins, Wally Joyner, Don August, Jeff Kent and numerous others. They were known as the Cook Inlet Bucs until 1984.

Home games are played at Mulcahy Stadium in Anchorage.

Cartesian Dreams

Cartesian Dreams is the seventh studio album by the rock band House of Lords. It was released on September 18, 2009 in Europe and October 13, 2009 in the US.

The album features the same line-up as the previous albums World Upside Down and Come to My Kingdom, except new bassist Matt McKenna, and was produced by singer James Christian and Jeff Kent with Tommy Denander as co producer on a couple of songs he co wrote.

Chrome Hill

Chrome Hill is a limestone reef knoll

on the Derbyshire side of the upper Dove valley. It is adjacent to the more distinctive but lower Parkhouse Hill.

Chrome Hill was declared open access land

under the provisions of the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000. However, the only access from the north west remains along a concessionary footpath. Chrome Hill contains good exposures of Gigantoproductus fossils; it is part of a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest and visitors should not remove geological samples.

In 1997, the writer Jeff Kent discovered that a double sunset could be seen against Chrome Hill from the southern flank of Parkhouse Hill. Two years later, the author discovered that a similar event took place from nearby Glutton Bridge, on the upper valley of the River Dove, which was more easily accessible. Shortly afterwards, the phenomenon was first captured on film by the photographer Chris Doherty. Since 2002, Kent has offered guided public viewings of the occurrence from Glutton Bridge on the summer solstice, with a fair degree of success. The phenomenon is visible from Glutton Bridge in good weather for a short period around the summer solstice, when the sun sets just to the southwest of the summit of Chrome Hill, begins to re-emerge almost immediately afterwards from its steep northeastern slope before fully reappearing and later sets for a second and final time at the foot of the hill. The precise event and its location are described in Kent's book The Mysterious Double Sunset.Chrome Hill has had songs written in its honour by the Norwegian musicians Sigurd Hole (Chrome Hill) and Jonas Howden Sjøvaag (Up on Chrome Hill). In 2008 the Norwegian jazz quartet Damp changed its name to Chrome Hill.

Come to My Kingdom

Come to My Kingdom is the sixth studio album by House of Lords, released on March 17, 2008 in Europe and October 7, 2008 in the US.

The album features the same line-up as the previous album World Upside Down and was produced by singer James Christian and Jeff Kent who also co-wrote most all of the album's vocal melodies and lyrics.

Dreams (band)

Dreams was one of the original prominent jazz rock bands in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The band was formed by Jeff Kent and Doug Lubahn, who wrote and arranged their songs. It began as a trio and evolved into a horn-based band over time. They were later joined by Will Lee, Don Grolnick, Bob Mann, and Eddie Vernon.

Dreams selected as their producer, composer and sound engineer, Fred Weinberg, whose work included albums for Eddie Palmieri, Tito Puente, La Lupe, Mongo Santamaria, Celia Cruz, Illustration (Alan Lorber's group), and Little Anthony. Phil Ramone, another highly respected producer and studio owner, for whom Weinberg worked at the time at a studio named A & R in New York City, gave his blessings to Weinberg to record and mix the Dreams LP with former Atlantic A-1 engineer Jim Reeves at CBS Studios in New York City. During the Dreams sessions the recording sessions were moved by CBS execs to their CBS Chicago Studios because the CBS 52nd street studios became booked for several weeks by Paul Simon, and because Dreams had a deadline for their LP release. The album received a full page ad and a favorable review in Billboard Magazine.Dreams' second and final album Imagine My Surprise was produced in Memphis by Steve Cropper. Cropper wanted to "help the audience to better understand the group" so in his production he put "funkier, more commercial rhythms behind [the band]" while trying to "keep jazz up front at the same time."While Dreams did not achieve the commercial success of either Chicago or Blood Sweat & Tears, they served as a launchpad for eventually prominent jazz fusion artists Billy Cobham, Don Grolnick, and Randy & Michael Brecker (later known as the Brecker Brothers). Other prominent band members included guitarist John Abercrombie, trombonist Barry Rogers, guitarist Bob Mann (who later joined Mountain) and bassist Will Lee.

One of the principal differences between Dreams and most other brass-infused bands was Dream's emphasis on spontaneity. The horn section would "work up spontaneous arrangements by jamming, always leaving them wide open to interpretations from night to night."

House of Lords (band)

House of Lords is a rock band based out of Connecticut, with members in New Jersey and Florida.

Jeff Kent (author)

Jeffrey John William Kent (born 28 July 1951) is an English academic, musician, and historian.

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at second base

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Among second basemen, Ryne Sandberg, who played 15 seasons with the Chicago Cubs in his 16-year career, owns the most Silver Sluggers with seven wins, including five consecutive from 1988 to 1992. Three other National League players have won the award four times. Jeff Kent (2000–2002, 2005) won three consecutive awards with the San Francisco Giants, before adding a fourth with the Los Angeles Dodgers; Craig Biggio, who played his entire career with the Houston Astros, won the award four times as a second baseman (1994–1995, 1997–1998) after winning another as a catcher. Chase Utley followed Kent's last win by capturing four consecutive awards (2006–2009).In the American League, José Altuve and Robinson Canó have won five Silver Slugger awards. Altuve won five consecutive awards (2014–2018), all with the Astros, while Cano won all five of his Silver Slugger awards as a member of the New York Yankees, including four consecutive wins (2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013). Altuve and Cano's five Silver Slugger awards are second-most all-time for a second baseman and first among American League winners, ahead of four second basemen who are all four-time winners in the American League. Roberto Alomar won the award at the same position with three different teams (Baltimore Orioles, Toronto Blue Jays, Cleveland Indians). Julio Franco won four consecutive awards (1988–1991) with two different teams, and Lou Whitaker won four awards in five years (1983–1985, 1987) with the Detroit Tigers.Altuve holds the record for the highest batting average in a second baseman's Silver Slugger-winning season with the .346 mark he set in 2017. In the National League, Daniel Murphy's .347 batting average in 2016 ranks first. Willie Randolph, who won the inaugural award in the 1980 season, set a record for on-base percentage (.427) that has not yet been broken. Chuck Knoblauch is second behind Randolph in the American League with a .424 on-base percentage, a mark that was tied by Jeff Kent in 2000 to set the National League record. That year, Kent also set the record among second basemen for highest slugging percentage (.596) and the National League record for runs batted in (125). Bret Boone is the overall leader in runs batted in (141) and holds the American League record for slugging percentage (.578); both of these records were established in 2001. Sandberg hit 40 home runs in 1990, the most ever by a second baseman in a winning season, while Alfonso Soriano set the American League mark with 39 in 2002.

Parkhouse Hill

Parkhouse Hill is a small but distinctive hill in the Peak District National Park in the English county of Derbyshire. It lies on the north side of the River Dove, close to the border with Staffordshire.

Geologically, the hill is the remains of an atoll (a 'reef knoll') which is believed to have existed during the Carboniferous period when what is now the Peak District was covered by a tropical sea. Together with its higher but less distinctive neighbour, Chrome Hill, it forms the Chrome and Parkhouse Hills SSSI, cited for their geology and limestone flora.For many years access to Parkhouse Hill was difficult, as there was no right of way to the summit. Access is now possible under the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, as the hill is a designated access area.

In 1997, the writer Jeff Kent discovered that a double sunset could be seen against Parkhouse Hill from nearby Glutton Grange and, two years later, the phenomenon was first captured on film by the photographer Chris Doherty. The occurrence is visible in good weather in late March, early April and September, when the sun sets just to the south of the summit of the hill, begins to re-emerge almost immediately afterwards from its steep northern slope before fully reappearing and later sets for a second and final time at the foot of the hill. The precise event and its location are described in Kent's book The Mysterious Double Sunset.

Silver Slugger Award

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball. These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.The prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position. This means that it is possible for three left fielders, or any other combination of outfielders, to win the award in the same year, rather than one left fielder, one center fielder, and one right fielder. In addition, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include a designated hitter in place of the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead.Home run record-holder Barry Bonds won twelve Silver Slugger Awards in his career as an outfielder, the most of any player. He also won the award in five consecutive seasons twice in his career: from 1990 to 1994, and again from 2000 to 2004. Retired former New York Mets catcher Mike Piazza and former New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez are tied for second, with ten wins each. Rodriguez' awards are split between two positions; he won seven Silver Sluggers as a shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and Texas Rangers, and three with the Yankees as a third baseman. Wade Boggs leads third basemen with eight Silver Slugger Awards; Barry Larkin leads shortstops with nine. Other leaders include Ryne Sandberg (seven wins as a second baseman) and Mike Hampton (five wins as a pitcher). Todd Helton and Albert Pujols are tied for the most wins among first baseman with four, although Pujols has won two awards at other positions. David Ortiz has won seven awards at designated hitter position, the most at that position.

Thorpe Cloud

Thorpe Cloud is an isolated limestone hill (a reef knoll) lying between the villages of Thorpe and Ilam on the Derbyshire/Staffordshire border at the southern end of Dovedale. It is a popular hill amongst the many day-trippers who visit the area, and provides a fine viewpoint north up the dale and south across the Midland plain.

Like much of the dale, including Bunster Hill on the opposite bank, it is in the ownership of the National Trust, and is part of their South Peak Estate. These Dovedale properties were acquired by the Trust in 1934.

In 1997, the writer Jeff Kent discovered that a double sunset could be seen against Thorpe Cloud from the top of nearby Lin Dale and, two years later, the phenomenon was first captured on film by the photographer Chris Doherty. The occurrence is visible in good weather on and around the summer solstice and perhaps beyond, when the sun sets on the summit of the hill, partially reappears from its steep northern slope and sets for a second and final time shortly afterwards. The precise event and its location are described in Kent's book The Mysterious Double Sunset.Thorpe Cloud and Dovedale were used as locations in the 2010 film of Robin Hood, starring Russell Crowe. Thorpe Cloud can be clearly made out in several scenes towards the end of the film.

Thorpe Cloud also has a rifle range which local and national shooting clubs use.

World Upside Down

World Upside Down is the fifth studio album (second since the reunion), by House of Lords, released on May 23, 2006.

The album features founding member James Christian once again with an all-new line-up, as he is the only one of the original members left on the line-up. Still, founding member Gregg Giuffria, who was not reunited with the original line-up for the 2004 album The Power and the Myth, is featured on the album as a guest keyboardist.

Collaborator and producer Jeff Kent played bass and keyboards on the album, as the band was without a bassist at the time.

Sporting News Major League Baseball All Decade Team (2000–2009)
Winners of
Survivor

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