Jeff Kemp

Jeffrey Allan Kemp (born July 11, 1959) is a former professional American football quarterback who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the Los Angeles Rams, San Francisco 49ers, Seattle Seahawks, and the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at Dartmouth College.[1] In 1984, Kemp led the Rams with 13 touchdown passes and a trip to the playoffs. In 1986 as a back-up to the injured Joe Montana, he threw 11 touchdowns for the 49ers.

Kemp is the son of late former NFL quarterback and American politician Jack Kemp[1] and brother of former Canadian Football League quarterback Jimmy Kemp. Kemp and his wife, Stacy, have four sons: Kyle, Kory, Kolby and Keegan. He went to high school at Winston Churchill High School in Potomac, Maryland.

Jeff Kemp
No. 9, 15, 16
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:July 11, 1959 (age 59)
Santa Ana, California
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:201 lb (91 kg)
Career information
High school:Potomac (MD) Winston Churchill
College:Dartmouth
Undrafted:1981
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Pass attempts:916
Pass completions:479
Percentage:52.3
TDINT:39–40
Passing yards:6,230
Passer rating:70.0
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ a b Shribman, David; DeGange, Jack (2004). Dartmouth College Football: Green Fields of Autumn. Arcadia Publishing. p. 110. ISBN 9780738536118. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
1981 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1981 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 44th year with the National Football League (NFL) and the 36th season in Los Angeles. The Rams looked to improve on their 11-5 record from 1980. The team failed to improve upon their 11-5 record, and finished with a mediocre 6-10 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 1972.

1984 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1984 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 47th season in the National Football League, their 48th overall, and their 39th in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Rams looked to improve on their 9–7 record from 1983 and make the playoffs for the second consecutive season and 10th in the last 12. They improved on their record by one game, going 10–6, good enough for second place in the NFC West behind the 15–1 San Francisco 49ers. In the playoffs, the Rams lost a low-scoring game to the New York Giants at home, 16–13. During this season, second-year running back Eric Dickerson set the NFL record for most rushing yards in a season, with 2,105 yards.

1985 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1985 Los Angeles Rams season was the franchise's 48th season in the National Football League, their 38th overall, and their 40th in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Rams played in the NFC Championship Game, but were shutout by the eventual Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears. Eric Dickerson rushed for 1,234 yards in 1985 while missing the first two games while in a contract dispute. He missed the Pro Bowl for the first time in his short NFL career. He did, however, go on to rush for a playoff record 248 yards against the Dallas Cowboys in post-season play. It was also the last time the Rams would win an NFC West divisional title for Los Angeles until 2017, and the last NFC West title until 1999 while they were in St. Louis.

1991 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1991 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 59th season in the National Football League.

Despite having a 10–6 record and finishing with the top-ranked defense in the NFL, the Eagles failed to make the playoffs. During Week 1, quarterback Randall Cunningham was lost for the season with a knee injury.

Statistics site Football Outsiders ranks the 1991 Eagles as the greatest defensive team in their ranking's history. Says Football Outsiders, The 1991 Eagles completely lap the field in terms of defensive DVOA. Only the 2002 Bucs had a better pass defense, and only the 2000 Ravens had a better run defense, and the Eagles were much more balanced than either of those teams.

It's crazy to imagine how few points the Eagles might have given up if they were playing with a halfway-decent offense instead of losing Randall Cunningham to a torn ACL in the first game of the season. The Eagles were stuck depending on an over-the-hill Jim McMahon for 11 starts, plus Jeff Kemp for two and Brad Goebel for two. McMahon actually wasn't half bad ... but the other two quarterbacks were awful, especially Goebel who had no touchdowns with six interceptions. And the running game was dreadful, with 3.1 yards per carry as a team.

Still, the Eagles were fifth in the league in points allowed, and first in yards allowed by nearly 400 yards – and the team that was second in yards allowed is also on that top-ten defenses list, the 1991 New Orleans Saints. The Eagles allowed 3.9 yards per play, where no other team allowed fewer than 4.5. As bad as their running game was, their run defense was even better, allowing 3.0 yards per carry. Three-fourths of the starting defensive line was All-Pro (Reggie White, Jerome Brown, and Clyde Simmons). Linebacker Seth Joyner and cornerback Eric Allen made the Pro Bowl as well.

Albie Reisz

Albert Harry “Albie” Reisz (November 29, 1917 – May 1, 1985) was a professional American football player who played quarterback for three seasons for the Cleveland / Los Angeles Rams.

Bruce Mathison

Bruce Martin Mathison (born April 25, 1959) is a former American football quarterback who played in the NFL for the San Diego Chargers (two stints), Buffalo Bills, and the Seattle Seahawks. He played college football at the University of Nebraska.

George Mira

George Ignacio Mira (born January 11, 1942) is a former professional American football player, a quarterback in eight National Football League (NFL) seasons for four teams. He then played five seasons in the Canadian Football League and World Football League.

Jim Powers (American football)

James W. Powers (February 29, 1928 – September 27, 2013) was an American football quarterback, defensive back and linebacker in the National Football League. He played for the San Francisco 49ers. He played college football for the USC Trojans.

Jimmy Kemp

James Paul Kemp (born June 27, 1971) is the president of the Jack Kemp Foundation, the executive vice president of Group 47 and a former CFL quarterback. He is the brother of former NFL quarterback Jeff Kemp and the son of American Football League Most Valuable Player and U.S. Representative Jack Kemp.

Kelly Stouffer

Kelly Wayne Stouffer, (born July 6, 1964), is a former American football quarterback in the NFL. He spent most of his career with the Seattle Seahawks from 1988–1992. He graduated from Rushville High School in Rushville, Nebraska and attended Colorado State University.

He is a television color analyst for college football games on ESPN/ABC, and was formerly with the NFL on FOX, Versus, MountainWest Sports Network and Minnesota Vikings pre-season games.

At the conclusion of his collegiate career, he achieved notoriety when, after being selected by the St. Louis Cardinals in the first round of the 1987 NFL Draft, he sat out what would have been his rookie year due to an inability to agree on a contract. The following season, the Cardinals traded his rights to the Seattle Seahawks, who listed Stouffer as third-string behind starter Dave Krieg and veteran backup Jeff Kemp. Krieg would be sidelined with a separated shoulder, and the following week Kemp was ineffective starting in place of Krieg and was benched in favor of Stouffer by halftime. Stouffer endeared himself to Seattle fans in one play where, after having his nose broken, he threw for a long gain resulting in a touchdown. For several weeks, Stouffer filled in until Krieg returned to the lineup. Stouffer seemed to regress in the eyes of Seahawk coaches over the next couple of years, and fell back to third string behind Kemp.

Once Seahawk head coach Chuck Knox was replaced by Tom Flores and Dave Krieg was let go, Stouffer won the starting job, beating out Dan McGwire and Stan Gelbaugh. Stouffer was injured in week 5, and the Seahawks started the season 1-4. After McGwire was quickly injured, journeyman Gelbaugh became the starter, yielding the job to Stouffer once Stouffer recovered. Stouffer, who seemed to have been showing a return to his rookie form just before his injury, was never the same, however, and Gelbaugh quickly became the established starter. The following season, Stouffer was released.

Stouffer was signed by the Miami Dolphins to a free agent contract in April 1994 but was released prior to the regular season.

Two years later, Stouffer was signed by the Carolina Panthers to a free agent contract in March 1996 but was released prior to the regular season.

In 2000, Stouffer finished his B.S. degree in biology from the Colorado State University College of Agricultural Sciences and became the first undergraduate to earn that degree via the college's distance learning program.

List of Los Angeles Rams starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League. The Rams were formerly known as the St. Louis Rams and the Cleveland Rams. The players are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Rams.

List of Philadelphia Eagles starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Eagles.

List of San Francisco 49ers starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the 49ers.

List of Seattle Seahawks starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Seahawks.

Matt Cavanaugh

Matthew Andrew Cavanaugh (born October 27, 1956) is an American football coach and former player who is the Senior Offensive Assistant for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He is a former American football quarterback in the NFL who played from 1978 to 1991. In the course of his career as a professional football player, he earned two Super Bowl rings. Since his retirement, Cavanaugh has worked as an offensive coach and coordinator, for teams including the San Francisco 49ers, the Chicago Bears, and the Baltimore Ravens, where he earned a third Super Bowl ring as a coach.

Norm Snead

Norman Bailey Snead (born July 31, 1939) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins, Philadelphia Eagles, Minnesota Vikings, New York Giants, and San Francisco 49ers. He played college football for Wake Forest University and was drafted in the first round (second overall pick) of the 1961 NFL Draft.

Red Kirkman

Roger Randolph "Red" Kirkman (October 17, 1905 – November 30, 1973) was a professional American football player for the Philadelphia Eagles. He attended high school in Akron, Ohio. He attended Washington & Jefferson College and Western Reserve University (now known as Case Western Reserve University).

Scott Bull

John Scott Bull (born June 8, 1953) is a former professional football player, spending three seasons as a quarterback with the San Francisco 49ers. He played college football at the University of Arkansas.

In his NFL career, Bull completed 76 of 193 passes for 3 touchdowns. A strong running quarterback, he rushed for 186 yards in 46 attempts and three touchdowns in his three-year professional career. Bull saw his most extensive action in 1978. He spent 1979 on injured reserve with a knee injury suffered in the final game of the 1978 season.

Tom Owen (American football)

Willis Thomas Owen (born September 1, 1952) is a former American football quarterback who played in ten National Football League (NFL) seasons from 1974–1982 for the San Francisco 49ers, the New England Patriots, the Washington Redskins, and the New York Giants. He played college football at Wichita State University and was drafted in the thirteenth round of the 1974 NFL Draft.

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