Jeff Bregel

Jeffrey Bryan Bregel (born May 1, 1964) is a former college and professional[1] football who was a guard in the National Football League (NFL) for three seasons during the late 1980s. He played college football for the University of Southern California, and thereafter played professionally for the San Francisco 49ers of the NFL. Bregel was born in Redondo Beach, California.

Jeff Bregel
No. 65
Position:Guard
Personal information
Born:May 1, 1964 (age 54)
Redondo Beach, California
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:435 lb (197 kg)
Career information
High school:Los Angeles (CA) Kennedy
College:Southern California
NFL Draft:1987 / Round: 2 / Pick: 37
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:21
Games started:3
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ Pro-Football-Reference
1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1985 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific 10 Conference teams for the 1985 college football season.

1985 College Football All-America Team

The 1985 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1985. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1985 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN), Gannett News Service (GNS), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Pro Football Weekly, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

Ten players were unanimously selected as first-team All-Americans by all five official selectors. They are:

Bo Jackson, Auburn running back who rushed for 1,786 yards and won the 1985 Heisman Trophy;

Chuck Long, Iowa quarterback who won the 1985 Davey O'Brien Award and Maxwell Award and placed second in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Lorenzo White, Michigan State running back who became the first Big Ten Conference player to rush for over 2,000 yards and placed fourth in the 1985 Heisman Trophy voting;

Brian Bosworth, Oklahoma linebacker who won the 1985 Dick Butkus Award;

David Williams, Illinois wide receiver who caught 85 passes for 1,047 yards and finished his college career as the second leading receiver in NCAA history;

Larry Station, Iowa linebacker who led the team in tackles for the fourth straight season with 129;

John Lee, UCLA placekicker who set the NCAA record for highest percentage of extra points and field goals made in a career with 93.3% (116 of 117 PATs, 79 of 92 FGs);

Jim Dombrowski, Virginia offensive tackle;

Leslie O'Neal, Oklahoma defensive end; and

Tim Green, Syracuse defensive end.

1986 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1986 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1986 college football season.

1986 College Football All-America Team

The 1986 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1986. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1986 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1986 USC Trojans football team

The 1986 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth and final year under head coach Ted Tollner, the Trojans compiled a 7–5 record (5–3 against conference opponents), finished in a three-way tie for fourth place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 264 to 239.Quarterback Rodney Peete led the team in passing, completing 160 of 305 passes for 2,138 yards with 10 touchdowns and 15 interceptions. Ryan Knight led the team in rushing with 148 carries for 536 yards and seven touchdowns. Ken Henry led the team in receiving yards with 43 catches for 807 yards and seven touchdowns.

1987 NFL Draft

The 1987 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 28–29, 1987, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

1987 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1987 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 38th year with the National Football League. The 49ers won the division for the second consecutive season, and ended the season as the top seed in the NFC playoffs. The season ended with an upset loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs.

1988 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1988 San Francisco 49ers season was their 43rd season in the National Football League. The season was highlighted by their third Super Bowl victory. In 1988, the 49ers struggled. At one point, they were 6–5 and in danger of missing the playoffs but rose to defeat the Washington Redskins on a Monday night, eventually finishing the season at 10–6. They gained a measure of revenge by thrashing the Minnesota Vikings 34–9 in the first round. The 49ers then traveled to Chicago's Soldier Field, where the chill factor at gametime was 26 degrees below zero. They defeated the Chicago Bears 28–3 in the NFC Championship.

For the 49ers, it was their first Super Bowl appearance since they defeated the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl XIX. They had made the playoffs in the three seasons between Super Bowl XIX and Super Bowl XXIII, but were eliminated each time in the first round, primarily because of the poor performances by their offensive stars in those games; quarterback Joe Montana, receiver Jerry Rice and running back Roger Craig all failed to produce a single touchdown.

The 49ers alternated quarterbacks as Montana and Steve Young both started at various points of the season. The broadcast booth of the 49ers radio network also saw change, as Joe Starkey substituted for longtime 49ers play by play announcer Lon Simmons during several games, mostly in October when Simmons called the Oakland Athletics 1988 American League Championship Series and 1988 World Series games for the Oakland A's flagship station, KSFO–AM. The 1988 season was the last for Simmons as 49ers broadcaster. With the regular season and postseason, the 49ers compiled a total of 13 victories (a .684 win percentage) on the season, a record-low for Super Bowl champions. In 2011, the New York Giants would tie this record (but with a .650 win percentage as they suffered seven losses as opposed to the 49ers six).

1989 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1989 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th season in the National Football League and first under head coach George Seifert. After going 14–2 in the regular season, the 49ers completed the season with the most dominant playoff run in NFL history, outscoring opponents 126–26 and winning their fourth Super Bowl victory.

In 2007, ESPN.com's Page 2 ranked the 1989 49ers as the greatest team in Super Bowl history.This was the season were the 49ers added the black trim on the SF logo on the helmets which lasted until the 1995 season and the final season the team wore screen printed numbers on jerseys.

Quarterback Joe Montana had one of the greatest passing seasons in NFL history in 1989. Montana set a then-NFL record with a passer rating of 112.4, with a completion percentage of 70.2%, and a 26/8 touchdown-to-interception ratio. In the playoffs, Montana was even more dominant, with a 78.3% completion percentage, 800 yards, 11 touchdowns, no interceptions, and a 146.4 rating. Cold Hard Football Facts calls Montana's 1989 season "the one by which we must measure all other passing seasons."

Granada Hills, Los Angeles

Granada Hills is a lightly populated, highly diverse and high-income neighborhood. It is a suburban residential community in the San Fernando Valley portion of the city of Los Angeles.

There is an active sports program and a range of city recreation centers. The neighborhood has fourteen public and seven private schools.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

List of USC Trojans in the NFL Draft

This is a list of USC Trojans football players in the NFL Draft.

Pac-12 Conference football individual awards

Coaches of the Pac-12 Conference bestow the following awards at the end of each football season. The conference was founded in its current form as the Athletic Association of Western Universities in 1959, but traces its roots to the Pacific Coast Conference, founded in 1915. The conference name changed to Pacific-8 Conference (Pac-8) in 1968 and Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) in 1978. The conference's 2011 expansion to 12 members saw the conference formally renamed as the Pac-12 Conference.

San Francisco 49ers draft history

This page is a list of San Francisco 49ers NFL Draft selections. The first draft the 49ers participated in was the 1950 NFL Draft, in which they made Leo Nomellini of Minnesota their first ever selection.

Offense
Defense
Special teams
Offense
Defense
Special teams
Offense
Defense

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