Jeff Brantley

Jeffrey Hoke Brantley (born September 5, 1963), is an American former professional baseball relief pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 14 seasons, from 1988 to 2001.[1] Brantley currently is a broadcaster for the Cincinnati Reds.[2]

Jeff Brantley
Jeff Brantley covering Reds at Phillies 2008
Pitcher
Born: September 5, 1963 (age 55)
Florence, Alabama
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 5, 1988, for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
May 23, 2001, for the Texas Rangers
MLB statistics
Win–loss record43–46
Earned run average3.39
Strikeouts728
Saves172
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early career

Brantley lettered in three sports at W. A. Berry High School[3] (which was replaced by Hoover High School (Alabama)). Brantley also was the quarterback on Berry state championship football team.[4]

Brantley played college baseball at Mississippi State University, where he was a teammate of Will Clark, Rafael Palmeiro and Bobby Thigpen on a Bulldogs team that participated in the 1985 College World Series.[5] He is the co-holder of the SEC record for career wins by a pitcher with 45, along with University of South Carolina and Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Kip Bouknight.[6]

Major league career

Brantley played for the San Francisco Giants, Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies, all of the National League, and the Texas Rangers of the American League. He was a member of the 1989 Giants that defeated the Chicago Cubs to win the National League pennant and eventually lost to the Oakland A's in the World Series.[1] In the World Series, he pitched in three games with an ERA of 4.15.[7]

Brantley was an All-Star in 1990, finishing the season with a 5-3 record and a 1.56 ERA.[7] He led the National League in 1996 with 44 saves.[1]

In 2010, he was inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame.[8][9]

Broadcasting career

Brantley was a color commentator for ESPN broadcasts of Major League Baseball games and an in-studio contributor for Baseball Tonight from 2002 through 2006. In 2007, he joined the radio broadcast team of the Cincinnati Reds on the Cincinnati Reds Radio Network (flagship station WLW 700 AM), joining Marty Brennaman and Thom Brennaman and the FSN Ohio television broadcast team with Chris Welsh and George Grande.[10]

Personal

He and his wife, Ashley, are the parents of a daughter, Elizabeth, and a son, Mason. Brantley also has two children from his first marriage, Emily and Murphy.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Jeff Brantley Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  2. ^ "Broadcasters". Cincinnati Reds.
  3. ^ "Jeff Brantley - BR Bullpen". www.baseball-reference.com.
  4. ^ "Baseball Coach Larry Giangrosso Inducted Into Alabama Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame". UAB Sports. July 16, 2001. Retrieved 11 February 2014.
  5. ^ "Mississippi State University (Mississippi State, MS) Baseball Players - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "Database of Free Online Books, Textbooks, and Lecture Notes - Mssportsmagazine". www.mssportsmagazine.com.
  7. ^ a b "Jeff Brantley Stats - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  8. ^ Cleveland, Rick (October 23, 2016). "Brantley's World Series memory is one he'd just as soon forget". Mississippi Today. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-02-21. Retrieved 2014-02-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ "Cincinatti Reds Broadcasters". MLB.com.

External links

1985 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.The NCAA recognizes two different All-America selectors for the 1985 college baseball season: the American Baseball Coaches Association (since 1947) and Baseball America (since 1981).

1990 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1990 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 61st playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 10, 1990, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, the home of the Chicago Cubs of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 2-0. The game is remembered for a rain delay in the 7th inning that resulted in CBS airing Rescue 911 during the delay. This is also the first game – and so far the only one – to feature two players bearing the same name: Greg Olson. One was a pitcher, represented the AL squad and Baltimore Orioles and featured three G's in the first name and the other was a catcher, represented the NL squad and Atlanta Braves and featured only two G's in the first name. Outfielder Jose Canseco of the Oakland Athletics and First Baseman Will Clark of the San Francisco Giants were the leaders of their leagues in the fan votes. They both batted third in the line up for their squads.

The pregame ceremonies celebrated the 85th anniversary of the Great Lakes Naval Training Station which, as with previous All-Star Games held in Chicago, provided the colors presentation. After Wayne Messmer sang O Canada, recording artist (and native Chicagoan) Richard Marx sang The Star-Spangled Banner. The last All-Star Game previously held at Wrigley Field was represented by Ernie Banks who threw out the ceremonial first pitch.

1995 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1995 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Reds winning the National League Central, and the National League Division Series in three straight games over the Los Angeles Dodgers before losing the National League Championship Series in four games to the eventual World Series champion Atlanta Braves.

1995 National League Division Series

The 1995 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1995 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Saturday, October 7, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. As a result of both leagues realigning into three divisions in 1994, it marked the first time in major league history that a team could qualify for postseason play without finishing in first place in its league or division. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 90–54) vs. (4) Colorado Rockies (Wild Card, 77–67): Braves win series, 3–1.

(2) Cincinnati Reds (Central Division champion, 85–59) vs. (3) Los Angeles Dodgers (Western Division champion, 78–66): Reds win series, 3–0.The Atlanta Braves and Cincinnati Reds went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Braves became the National League champion, and defeated the American League champion Cleveland Indians in the 1995 World Series.

1995 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1995 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 113th season in the history of the franchise.

1998 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1998 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 116th season in the history of the franchise.

1999 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1999 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 117th season in the history of the franchise.

2000 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 2000 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 118th season in the history of the franchise.

Cincinnati Reds Radio Network

The Cincinnati Reds Radio Network is an American radio network composed of 69 radio stations which carry English-language coverage of the Cincinnati Reds, a professional baseball team in Major League Baseball (MLB). Cincinnati station WLW (700 AM) serves as the network's flagship; WLW also simulcasts over a low-power FM translator. The network also includes 68 affiliates in the U.S. states of Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee and West Virginia: fifty-three AM stations, thirty-nine of which supplement their signals with one or more low-power FM translators, and fifteen full-power FM stations. Marty Brennaman (through the 2019 season) and Jeff Brantley currently serve as the network's play-by-play announcers; Thom Brennaman, Marty's son, also does occasional radio play-by-play in addition to calling television broadcasts for the Reds on Fox Sports Ohio. The elder Brenneman announced in January 2019 that he would retire at the end of the 2019 season, his 46th calling Reds games.In addition to traditional over-the-air AM and FM broadcasts, network programming airs on SiriusXM satellite radio; and streams online via SiriusXM Internet Radio, TuneIn Premium, and MLB.com Gameday Audio. Cincinnati Bell has naming rights of the network.

Fresno Giants

The Fresno Giants were a minor league baseball team that played in the California League from 1941–1988. The team was based in Fresno, California.

List of Cincinnati Reds team records

This is a list of team records for the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. (The Reds do not recognize records set before 1900.)

List of ESPN Major League Baseball broadcasters

ESPN Major League Baseball broadcasters are listed below, including games broadcast only on ESPN currently and formerly.

List of Major League Baseball career games finished leaders

In baseball statistics, a relief pitcher is credited with a game finished (denoted by GF) if he is the last pitcher to pitch for his team in a game. A starting pitcher is not credited with a GF for pitching a complete game.

Mariano Rivera is the all-time leader in games finished with 952. Rivera is the only pitcher in MLB history to finish more than 900 career games. Trevor Hoffman and Lee Smith are the only other pitchers to finish more than 800 games in their careers.

Mississippi State Bulldogs baseball

The Mississippi State Bulldogs baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball team representing Mississippi State University in NCAA Division I college baseball. The program is a member of the West Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The current head coach is Chris Lemonis, who replaced interim head coach Gary Henderson. They have appeared in the College World Series 11 times, most recently in 2019. They earned their highest finish in their 2013 CWS appearance, losing in the finals to UCLA, finishing the season with a consensus No. 2 ranking, the highest in program history.

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