Jean Nunn

Jean Josephine Nunn, CB, CBE (21 July 1916 – 24 November 1982) was a senior British civil servant. She served as Principal Private Secretary to James Chuter Ede and Sir David Maxwell-Fyfe, during their time as Home Secretary. She later served as Deputy Secretary of the Cabinet Office. She was the first woman to be admitted to the Order of the Bath.[1]

Jean Nunn

CB CBE
Born
Jean Josephine Nunn

21 July 1916
Abbotsham, Devon
Died24 November 1982 (aged 66)
Horsham, Sussex
NationalityBritish
EducationRoyal School for Daughters of Officers of the Army
Alma materGirton College, Cambridge
OccupationCivil servant
Years active1938 to 1970

Early life

Nunn was born on 21 July 1916 in Abbotsham, Devon, to John Henry Nunn, and his wife, Doris Josephine Nunn (née Gregory). Her father, an officer in the Royal Field Artillery died during World War I. She was educated at St Leonard's School in Ealing, and at the Royal School for Daughters of Officers of the Army, a girls boarding school in Bath, Somerset.[1]

In 1934, she matriculated into Girton College, University of Cambridge. She studied the History Tripos for both Part I and Part II. She graduated in 1937 Bachelor of Arts (BA), which was later promoted to Master of Arts (MA).[1]

Career

In 1938, Nunn joined the Home Office, having passed the examination for the administrative grade of Her Majesty's Civil Service. In 1941, she was appointed private secretary to Sir Alexander Maxwell, the Permanent Under-Secretary of State of the Home Office. From 1947 to 1949, she served as Secretary to the Royal Commission on the Press.[1]

From 1949 to 1951, she served as Principal Private Secretary to James Chuter Ede, the then Home Secretary. She was the first woman to hold this appointment. When Sir David Maxwell Fyfe became Home Secretary, she remained on as his Principal Private Secretary.[1][2] In 1961, she was promoted to Assistant Under-Secretary of State and appointed head of the Children's Department. In 1963, she moved to the Cabinet Office.[1]

In 1963, she was promoted to Deputy Secretary of the Cabinet Office.[1] She was the first woman to be appointed to that rank.[3] In 1970, she became ill and had to take early retirement. Had she not been, she was heading ultimately towards the leadership of one of the departments.[1]

Later life

Having retired in 1970, she spent the next few years being cared for by a friend. The illness that ended her Civil Service career was cerebral arteriosclerosis.[1]

On 24 November 1982, after years of declining health, she died in Oakhill House Nursing Home, Horsham, Sussex.[1] A memorial service was held for her at St Margaret's, Westminster, on 18 January 1983. Attendees included senior civil servants and politicians.[4]

Honours

In the 1966 New Year Honours, she was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for her services as Under-Secretary of the Cabinet Office.[5] In the 1970 New Year Honours, she was appointed Companion of the Order of the Bath (CB), for her services as Deputy Secretary of the Cabinet Office.[6] This made her the first woman to be appointed to the Order of the Bath.[1][7]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Allen, Philip (2004). "Nunn, Jean Josephine (1916–1982)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  2. ^ "Latest Wills". The Times. 12 March 1983. p. 10.
  3. ^ Allen, Philip (6 November 1992). "Woman at the top". The Times. p. 21.
  4. ^ "Memorial Services". The Times. 19 January 1983. p. 14.
  5. ^ "No. 43854". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1965. pp. 9–10.
  6. ^ "No. 45262". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1970. p. 3.
  7. ^ "New Year Honours for 20 Tory officials". The Times. 1 January 1971. p. 1.
1997 Oxfordshire County Council election

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2003 Vale of White Horse District Council election

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2007 Vale of White Horse District Council election

Elections to Vale of White Horse District Council were held on 3 May 2007. The whole council was up for election and the council stayed under Liberal Democrat control with an increased majority. Turnout was significantly higher in many wards than it was in 2003.

2013 Oxfordshire County Council election

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All locally registered electors (British, Irish, Commonwealth and European Union citizens) who were aged 18 or over on Thursday 2 May 2013 were entitled to vote in the local elections. Those who were temporarily away from their ordinary address (for example, away working, on holiday, in student accommodation or in hospital) were also entitled to vote in the local elections, although those who had moved abroad and registered as overseas electors cannot vote in the local elections. It is possible to register to vote at more than one address (such as a university student who had a term-time address and lives at home during holidays) at the discretion of the local Electoral Register Office, but it remains an offence to vote more than once in the same local government election.

Order of the Bath

The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath) is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. The name derives from the elaborate medieval ceremony for appointing a knight, which involved bathing (as a symbol of purification) as one of its elements. The knights so created were known as "Knights of the Bath". George I "erected the Knights of the Bath into a regular Military Order". He did not (as is commonly believed) revive the Order of the Bath, since it had never previously existed as an Order, in the sense of a body of knights who were governed by a set of statutes and whose numbers were replenished when vacancies occurred.The Order consists of the Sovereign (currently Queen Elizabeth II), the Great Master (currently Charles, Prince of Wales, and three Classes of members:

Knight Grand Cross (GCB) or Dame Grand Cross (GCB)

Knight Commander (KCB) or Dame Commander (DCB)

Companion (CB)Members belong to either the Civil or the Military Division. Prior to 1815, the order had only a single class, Knight Companion (KB), which no longer exists. Recipients of the Order are now usually senior military officers or senior civil servants. Commonwealth citizens who are not subjects of the Queen and foreign nationals may be made Honorary Members.The Order of the Bath is the fourth-most senior of the British Orders of Chivalry, after The Most Noble Order of the Garter, The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, and The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick (dormant).

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Royal Commission on the Press

Three Royal Commissions on the Press were held in the United Kingdom during the 20th century. The first (1947–49) proposed the creation of a General Council of the Press to govern behaviour, promote consumer interests and conduct research into the long-term social and economic impact of the print industry. This led to the setting up of the Press Council in 1953. The second Royal Commission (1961–62) studied the economic and financial factors that affecting the Press whilst the third (1974–77) proposed the development of a written Code of Practice for newspapers.

Royal School for Daughters of Officers of the Army

The Royal School for Daughters of Officers of the Army was a girls' boarding school situated in Bath, England. In 1998 it was incorporated into the Royal High School.

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