Javy López

Javier "Javy" Lopez Torres (born November 5, 1970) is a Puerto Rican former catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Atlanta Braves (1992–2003), Baltimore Orioles (2004–2006) and Boston Red Sox (2006). He batted and threw right-handed. He was named Ponce, Puerto Rico's Athlete of the Year from 1984 to 1987.

Javy López
Javy Lopez 3x4
Catcher
Born: November 5, 1970 (age 48)
Ponce, Puerto Rico
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 18, 1992, for the Atlanta Braves
Last MLB appearance
September 2, 2006, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.287
Home runs260
Runs batted in864
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

Atlanta Braves

López (birth name: Javier López Torres [note 1]) was signed by the Atlanta Braves in 1987 as an amateur free agent, López made his debut on September 18, 1992, against the Houston Astros. After sharing duties with Charlie O'Brien and Eddie Pérez for four seasons, he established himself as the Braves' regular catcher in 1996. The same season, he led the Braves to win the National League Championship Series, earning the series Most Valuable Player honors. He also made the National League All-Star team from 1997–98. Lopez had his best season in 2003 with a .328 batting average, 43 home runs and 109 RBI in 129 games, including a .378 on-base percentage and a .687 slugging percentage. In that season he broke Todd Hundley's record for most home runs hit in a season by a catcher (41) and was selected to the All-Star Game, winning the Silver Slugger Award and finishing fifth in the National League MVP ballot.

While with the Braves, López caught Kent Mercker's no-hitter on April 8, 1994.[1]

Baltimore Orioles

Before the 2004 season López signed as a free agent with the Baltimore Orioles. He hit .316 with 86 RBI, and the following season hit .278 with 49 RBI, while seeing a decline in his game time from 150 to 103 games.

Boston Red Sox

In the 2006 midseason he was acquired by the Boston Red Sox from Baltimore in exchange for minor league outfielder Adam Stern and cash consideration.[2] López debuted with Boston on the same day after Doug Mirabelli left the game early after an ankle injury. On September 8, the Red Sox released López due to Jason Varitek returning from the disabled list, which minimized his playing time.

Retirement

In January 2007, it was reported that López reached a preliminary agreement on a $750,000, one-year contract with the Colorado Rockies,[3] but he did not play for them during the regular season.[4] Before the 2008 season he signed a minor league deal with an invitation to spring training with the Atlanta Braves, in an attempt to return to the majors. But after being told he would not make the opening day lineup, López retired for good.[5] "I feel perfect physically", he said. "It's just that the hitting wasn't there and unfortunately I didn't throw the guy out on the stealing attempts. That's a concern. I don't blame them. My role as a backup catcher is to be able to throw every single runner out."[6] He plans to continue in the Atlanta Braves organization performing other duties.

In a 15-season career, López posted a .287 average with 260 home runs and 864 RBI in 1,503 games. His 243 home runs as a catcher ranks eighth on the career list at that position. His final game was on September 2, 2006.[7]

Personal

López married Analy Hernández. They had two children: Javier Alexander (born 11/6/95) and Kelvin Gabriel (born 10/17/99). They divorced and López married his second wife Gina Brodbeck on June 23, 2004,[8] and they have had two sons, Brody Brodbeck, born in 2010 and Gavin in 2013.[9]

Notes

  1. ^ This article uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is López and the second or maternal family name is Torres.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Retrosheet Boxscore: Atlanta Braves 6, Los Angeles Dodgers 0". Retrosheet.org. 1994-04-08. Retrieved 2014-03-06.
  2. ^ "Sports News & Articles – Scores, Pictures, Videos – ABC News". Abcnews.go.com. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved 2014-03-06.
  3. ^ "Former All-Star catcher Lopez, Rockies agree to deal – MLB – ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. 2007-01-09. Retrieved 2014-03-06.
  4. ^ "Rockies release veteran Lopez | Rockies.com: News". Colorado.rockies.mlb.com. 2013-05-24. Retrieved 2014-03-06.
  5. ^ "Lopez decides to retire after being cut | MLB.com: News". Mlb.mlb.com. 2013-05-24. Retrieved 2014-03-06.
  6. ^ "C Lopez retires after being reassigned to minor league camp – MLB – ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. 2008-03-22. Retrieved 2014-03-06.
  7. ^ "Javy Lopez stats". Baseball Reference.
  8. ^ "Javy Lopez: Biography and Career Highlights | braves.com: Players". Mlb.mlb.com. 2013-05-24. Retrieved 2014-03-06.
  9. ^ "Javy Lopez Q & A". Yardbarker.com. 2012-03-09. Retrieved 2014-03-06.

External links

1996 Atlanta Braves season

The 1996 Atlanta Braves season was the 126th season in the history of the franchise and 31st season in the city of Atlanta. They secured a regular season record of 96-66 and reached the World Series, where it lost to the New York Yankees in six games, failing to defend its championship in 1995. Despite taking a 2-0 lead the Braves unexpectedly lost the next 4 games. This World Series appearance was their fourth appearance in the last 5 years as a franchise. Atlanta won its seventh division title (second in the National League East, the other five in the NL West) and its fifth in six years. In the previous round, Atlanta completed a miraculous comeback. After trailing in the NLCS to St. Louis three games to one, Atlanta outscored St. Louis 32-1 in games five through seven to complete the comeback. The collapse was remembered as one of the largest in North American sports history.

1996 National League Championship Series

The 1996 National League Championship Series (NLCS) matched the East Division champion Atlanta Braves and the Central Division champion St. Louis Cardinals. It was the second NLCS meeting of the two teams and first since 1982. The Braves won in seven games, becoming the eighth team in baseball history to win a best-of-seven postseason series after being down 3–1, and first to overcome such a deficit in the NLCS. They outscored the Cardinals, 32–1, over the final three games. Also, Bobby Cox became the only manager to be on both the winning and losing end of such a comeback in postseason history, having previously blown the 1985 American League Championship Series with the Toronto Blue Jays against the Kansas City Royals.

The Braves would go on to lose to the New York Yankees in the World Series in six games.

1996 World Series

The 1996 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1996 season. The 92nd edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the National League (NL) champion (and defending World Series champion) Atlanta Braves and the American League (AL) champion New York Yankees. The Yankees defeated the Braves, four games to two, to capture their first World Series title since 1978 and their 23rd World Series championship overall. The series was played from October 20–26, 1996, and was broadcast on television on Fox. Yankees relief pitcher John Wetteland was named the World Series Most Valuable Player for saving all four Yankee wins.

The Yankees advanced to the World Series by defeating the Texas Rangers in the AL Division Series, three games to one, and then the Baltimore Orioles in the AL Championship Series, four games to one. It was the Yankees' first appearance in a World Series since 1981. The Braves advanced to the Series by defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in the NL Division Series, three games to none, and then the St. Louis Cardinals in the NL Championship Series, four games to three. It was the Braves' second consecutive appearance in a World Series.

The Yankees lost the first two games at home, being outscored by the Braves, 16–1. However, they rebounded to win the next four games, the last three in close fashion, including a dramatic comeback win in Game 4 to tie the series. They became the third team to win a World Series after losing Games 1 and 2 at their home stadium, following the Kansas City Royals in 1985 and the New York Mets in 1986. They also became the first team since the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1981 to win four consecutive games in a World Series after losing the first two.

Game 5 was the final game to be played at Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium, as the Braves moved into Turner Field the following season. Atlanta became the only city to host the World Series and the Olympics in the same year and Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium became the only stadium to host baseball in an Olympics and the World Series in the same year.

1997 Atlanta Braves season

The 1997 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 32nd season in Atlanta and 127th overall. The Braves won their sixth consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 9 games over the second place Florida Marlins. However, the Marlins would later defeat the Braves in the 1997 National League Championship Series. 1997 was the first year that the Braves played their home games in Turner Field, which originally served as a venue for the 1996 Summer Olympics.

1997 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1997 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 68th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1997, at Jacobs Field in Cleveland, the home of the Cleveland Indians of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3-1. The game marked the fifth time the All-Star Game was held in Cleveland and first since 1981. It was also the first All-Star game held at Jacobs Field, which opened three years earlier.

1998 Atlanta Braves season

The 1998 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 33rd season in Atlanta and 128th overall. They went on to win their seventh consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 18 games over the second place New York Mets.

The team featured six all stars: shortstop Walt Weiss and third baseman Chipper Jones were voted as starters, while first baseman Andrés Galarraga, catcher Javy López, and pitchers Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux were selected as reserves. Jones and Lopez each hit over 30 home runs as Galaragga (acquired from Colorado) led the club in home runs and RBI. Galaragga finished as an MVP candidate.

The 1998 Braves beat the Chicago Cubs three games to none in the National League Division Series. In the next round Atlanta then lost to the San Diego Padres in the National League Championship Series four games to two. Despite winning two games after losing the first three, Atlanta's comeback bid came short by being eliminated in game 6. San Diego's winning over Atlanta was seen as one of the biggest upsets in postseason history.

This team has earned a few historic accolades. ESPN writer David Schoenfield lists them as one of the top teams in MLB history to not win a World SeriesESPN columnist Jeff Merron also writes that the pitching staff of Maddux, Glavine, John Smoltz, Denny Neagle, and Kevin Millwood was the greatest of all time. The quintet posted a cumulative 2.97 ERA and amassed 88 wins (almost 18 wins per starter), equaling the win total of the 2nd place Mets. The 1998 Braves are the only team in MLB history to have five pitchers each strike out 150 batters in the same season. Glavine, the lone 20 game winner in the National League for that year, won the Cy Young Award.

1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 69th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 7, 1998, at Coors Field in Denver, Colorado, the home of the Colorado Rockies of the National League. The first All-Star contest played in the Mountain Time Zone, the game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13-8. It remains the highest-scoring All-Star Game in MLB history. Also, it was the last MLB All Star Game not to be held on the 2nd or 3rd Tuesday of July, it was held on the 1st Tuesday of July, and thus the earliest ASG held since then.

The pregame ceremony honored the United States Air Force Academy who provided the five-man color guard, flag presentations, and, at the end of country music singer Faith Hill's performance of the U.S. National Anthem, the flyover ceremonies. Hill's National Anthem performance was preceded by actress Gloria Reuben's performance of The Canadian National Anthem.

Twelve-year-old Elias Kurts was given the honor of throwing out the ceremonial first pitch, the first "non-celebrity" so honored.

1998 National League Division Series

The 1998 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 1998 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 29, and ended on Sunday, October 4, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 106–56) vs. (4) Chicago Cubs (Wild Card, 90–73): Braves win series, 3–0.

(2) Houston Astros (Central Division champion, 102–60) vs. (3) San Diego Padres (Western Division champion, 98–64): Padres win series, 3–1.The Atlanta Braves and San Diego Padres went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Padres defeated the Braves four games to two to become the National League champion, and lost to the American League champion New York Yankees in the 1998 World Series.

1999 Atlanta Braves season

The 1999 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 34th season in Atlanta and 129th overall. The Braves won their eighth consecutive division title with a 103-59 record and 6 game lead over the New York Mets. The Braves appeared in the World Series for the fifth time during the 1990s. The Braves lost all four games of the 1999 World Series to the New York Yankees, resulting in a sweep. The Braves played their 2nd World Series against the Yankees in 4 years, with the first being in 1996, which they played in six games. This is to date their last National League pennant.

Two key players on the 1999 Braves were Chipper Jones & John Rocker. Jones won the National League's Most Valuable Player award with a .310 average, 45 HRs, 110 RBIs, and sealed the award with his September heroics against the New York Mets. Rocker recorded 38 saves as Atlanta's closer, but later created controversy due to his racist and homophobic comments in a December 27, 1999, Sports Illustrated article.

2001 Atlanta Braves season

The 2001 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 36th season in Atlanta and 131st overall. The Braves won their tenth consecutive division title. The season saw the team finish first in the NL East Division with an 88-74 record – the worst among playoff teams in 2001, and also the worst record for the Braves since 1990 (meaning the worst record through their run of 14 consecutive division titles starting in 1991. Not counting the strike-shortened 1994 season). Atlanta finished the season with just a 2 game division lead over the Philadelphia Phillies.

The Braves swept the favored Houston Astros in the NLDS before losing to the eventual World Series champion Arizona Diamondbacks in the NLCS 4-1, in which Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling notably dominated Atlanta's offense.

2002 National League Division Series

The 2002 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2002 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Monday, October 7, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) Atlanta Braves (Eastern Division champion, 101–59) vs. (4) San Francisco Giants (Wild Card, 95–66); Giants win series, 3–2.

(2) Arizona Diamondbacks (Western Division champion, 98–64) vs. (3) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champion, 97–65); Cardinals win series, 3–0.The Cardinals and Giants went on to meet in the NL Championship Series (NLCS). The Giants became the National League champion, and lost to the American League champion Anaheim Angels in the 2002 World Series.

2005 Baltimore Orioles season

The 2005 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses. The team started off hot, compiling a record of 42 wins and 30 losses while spending 62 days in first place in AL East. After June 23, the team started slipping on the way to a losing record and manager Lee Mazzilli's dismissal in early August.

2006 Boston Red Sox season

The 2006 Boston Red Sox season was the 106th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League East with a record of 86 wins and 76 losses, 11 games behind the New York Yankees.

Atlanta Braves award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Atlanta Braves professional baseball franchise, including its years in Boston (1871–1952) and Milwaukee (1953–1965).

Greenville Braves

The Greenville Braves were an American minor league baseball franchise, based in Greenville, South Carolina, that served as the Class AA farm team of the Atlanta Braves between 1984 and 2004. The Braves played in Greenville Municipal Stadium for all 21 years of their existence.

The team had much success and many famous future Atlanta players such as Tom Glavine, Chipper Jones, Javy López, Jason Marquis, Eddie Pérez, Andruw Jones, and John Rocker played there. They won multiple Southern League championships, and the 1992 edition, managed by Grady Little and featuring Chipper Jones and López, won 100 out of 143 games (.699) during the regular season to take the pennant, then captured the SL playoff title. The 1992 Braves were recognized as one of the 100 greatest minor league teams of all time. After the 2004 season, the parent club in Atlanta transferred the G-Braves to Pearl, Mississippi, where the team is now known as the Mississippi Braves.

The Braves cited an outdated stadium that did not meet current standards and the City of Greenville's unwillingness to create a sufficient financial package to build a new stadium as the cause of the move. With the Greenville Braves out, the Greenville Bombers (formerly the Capital City Bombers), Class A South Atlantic League affiliate of the Boston Red Sox, moved into the old Braves stadium in 2005. In 2006, a brand new stadium located in Downtown Greenville, Fluor Field at the West End, opened and the Bombers changed their name to the Greenville Drive.

Greg Olson (baseball)

Greg Olson (born September 6, 1960) is a former Major League Baseball catcher who played with the Minnesota Twins and Atlanta Braves from 1989 to 1993. Olson was selected to the National League All-Star team in 1990 and appeared in the 1991 World Series with the Braves. In 1992, Olson was having a career year until a collision with Ken Caminiti of the Houston Astros broke his right leg. Olson played one more year for Atlanta before being released in the off season to make room for rising prospect Javy López. Olson signed with the New York Mets for the 1994 season but was released following spring training, leading to his retirement. Olson now resides in Eden Prairie, Minnesota in a mansion with his labrador retriever Ryder.

Javier López

Javier López may refer to:

Arturo López (Javier Arturo López, born 1983), Mexican-American baseball pitcher

Javier López (baseball) (born 1977), Puerto Rican-American baseball player

Javier López (general) (1792–1836), Argentine soldier and several times governor of Tucumán Province

Javier López (sport shooter) (born 1989), Spanish sports shooter

Javier López (born 1949), Spanish theologian and a priest of the Catholic Church

Javi López (Francisco Javier López Castro, born 1964), Spanish retired footballer and manager

Javi López (Francisco Javier López Díaz, born 1988), Spanish footballer

Javi López (Javier López Muñoz, born 1990), Spanish footballer

Javier López Fernández, Spanish member of the European Parliament

Javi López (Javier López Rodríguez, born 1986), Spanish footballer

Javy López (Javier López Torres, born 1970), Puerto Rican former catcher in Major League Baseball

Javier López Vallejo (born 1975), retired Spanish footballer

Javier López Zavala (born 1969), Mexican politician

Javier Vázquez López (born 2000), Spanish footballer

Johnny Estrada

Johnny Pulado Estrada III (born June 27, 1976) is a former American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a catcher for the Philadelphia Phillies, Atlanta Braves, Arizona Diamondbacks, Milwaukee Brewers and the Washington Nationals.

Estrada was selected in the 17th round of the 1997 Major League Baseball draft by the Philadelphia Phillies. His major league career started in 2001 with the Phillies after an injury to the regular starting catcher, Mike Lieberthal. In 2002, he became a part-time player. Estrada was acquired by the Atlanta Braves from the Phillies on December 20, 2002, for Kevin Millwood in a move that was said to be financially motivated, since the Braves could not pay Millwood's salary. During the 2003 season, Estrada spent most of the year on Atlanta's Triple-A team, the Richmond Braves. After Javy López left due to free agency, Estrada became Atlanta's starting catcher in 2004. He hit .314 with 9 home runs and 76 RBI. Estrada also made the All-Star team and helped Atlanta win their 13th division title in a row. After a slightly disappointing 2005 season, Estrada was traded by the Braves to the Arizona Diamondbacks for pitchers Lance Cormier and Óscar Villarreal on December 7, 2005.

The 2006 season saw Estrada return to his All-Star form. He hit .302 with 11 home runs and 71 RBI in 115 games. After the 2006 season, Estrada was traded to the Milwaukee Brewers along with pitchers Claudio Vargas and Greg Aquino for pitchers Doug Davis and Dana Eveland and outfielder Dave Krynzel.

On November 20, 2007, Estrada was traded from the Brewers to the New York Mets for pitcher Guillermo Mota. Estrada was not offered a new contract by the Mets and became a free agent on December 12, 2007. On January 31, 2008, Estrada signed a one-year contract with the Washington Nationals worth approximately $1.25 million. On July 24, Estrada was designated for assignment, and released on July 31.

List of Silver Slugger Award winners at catcher

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage (OBP), in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.Among catchers, Mike Piazza has won the most Silver Slugger Awards, with ten consecutive wins in the National League between 1993 and 2002; this is the most Silver Sluggers won consecutively by any player in Major League Baseball. In the American League, Iván Rodríguez has won the most Silver Sluggers, with six consecutive wins from 1994 to 1999, and a seventh when he tied with Víctor Martínez in 2004. Lance Parrish won the American League award six times (1980, 1982–1984, 1986, and 1990), and Joe Mauer and Jorge Posada have won it five times; Mauer won in 2006, 2008–2010 and 2013, while Posada won in 2000–2003 and 2007. Hall of Famer Gary Carter (1981–1983, 1984–1986) and Brian McCann (2006, 2008-2011) are five-time winners in the National League. Other multiple awardees include Buster Posey (four wins; 2012, 2014–2015, 2017), Benito Santiago (four wins; 1987–1988, 1990–1991), Mickey Tettleton (three wins; 1989, 1991–1992) and Carlton Fisk (three wins; 1981, 1985, 1988). J. T. Realmuto and Salvador Pérez are the most recent National and American League winners, respectively.

Piazza holds several Major League records for catchers in a Silver Slugger-winning season; most were set in 1997. That season, he had an on-base percentage of .431, and had 124 runs batted in (a total he matched in 1999) to lead the award-winning catchers in those statistical categories. Javy López holds the Major League records among winners for home runs (43) and slugging percentage (.687); these were set in 2003. Mauer holds the Major League record in batting average with a .365 clip he set in 2009. Mauer also leads the American League in on-base percentage (.444 in 2009) and slugging percentage (.587 in 2009). Parrish batted in 114 runs in 1983, and Fisk hit 37 home runs in 1985.

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