Jared Lorenzen

Jared Raymond Lorenzen (born February 14, 1981) is a former American football quarterback and former commissioner of the Ultimate Indoor Football League.[1] He played college football at Kentucky and was signed by the New York Giants as an undrafted free agent in 2004.

Lorenzen earned a Super Bowl ring with the Giants in Super Bowl XLII as the backup quarterback behind Eli Manning when the team defeated the then-undefeated New England Patriots in 2007.

Jared Lorenzen
refer to caption
Lorenzen at 2007 Giants training camp
No. 22, 13, 8
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:February 14, 1981 (age 38)
Covington, Kentucky
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:285 lb (129 kg)
Career information
High school:Fort Thomas (KY) Highlands
College:Kentucky
Undrafted:2004
Career history
As player:
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
As administrator:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:0–0
Passing yards:28
Passer rating:58.3
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Lorenzen attended Highlands High School in Fort Thomas, Kentucky, and was a letterman in football, basketball, and baseball. In basketball, he was a three-year letterman and helped lead his team to Kentucky Sweet 16 appearances.[2] As a junior, he passed for a Northern Kentucky-record 2,759 yards and 37 touchdowns in 13 games.[3] As a senior in 1998, he completed 62 percent of his passes for 3,393 yards, 45 touchdowns and six interceptions. He also rushed for 904 yards (8.4 average per carry) and 15 TDs in leading Highlands to a 15–0 season[4] and No.19 national ranking as a senior, earning him the Mr. Football Award.[5] Five games into his senior season, Lorenzen committed to the University of Kentucky.[3]

College career

When Lorenzen arrived at Kentucky, he redshirted as a true freshman. As a redshirt freshman, he was named the team's starting quarterback by head coach Hal Mumme ahead of returning starter Dusty Bonner.[6] The move caused Bonner to transfer.[7] Lorenzen's career at Kentucky was marked by two head coaching changes; Mumme departed as an investigation into NCAA rules violations brought down his staff and resulted in the program being placed on probation with scholarship limitations. After Lorenzen helped lead the team to a 7–5 record in 2002, head coach Guy Morriss left to become the head coach at Baylor University and was replaced by Rich Brooks, who designed plays in which Lorenzen lined up as a receiver while Shane Boyd played quarterback. Despite all the turmoil, Lorenzen set school records in total offense, passing yards, and passing touchdowns, eclipsing many marks set by 1999 NFL No. 1 overall draft pick Tim Couch.[8]

Statistics

Source:[9]

Passing Rushing Receiving
Season Team GS GP Rating Att Comp Pct Yds TD INT Att Yds TD Rec Yds TD
2000 Kentucky 11 11 116.5 559 321 57.4 3,687 19 21 76 140 5 0 0 0
2001 Kentucky 6 8 136.6 292 167 57.2 2,179 19 7 54 119 2 1 -13 0
2002 Kentucky 12 12 135.4 327 183 56.0 2,267 24 5 60 -51 0 0 0 0
2003 Kentucky 12 12 123.3 336 191 56.8 2,221 16 8 89 75 5 1 -11 0
Totals 41 43 126.0 1,514 862 56.9 10,354 78 41 279 283 12 2 -24 0

Numbers in bold are Kentucky records.

Professional career

New York Giants

Lorenzen was not selected in the 2004 NFL Draft and signed as undrafted free agent with the New York Giants.[10] He declined an offer by coach Tom Coughlin to play NFL Europe in 2005.[11] Lorenzen was the third string quarterback for 2004 and 2005 for the Giants.

In the 2006 preseason, Lorenzen led his team to victory by engineering a game-winning drive against the Baltimore Ravens. Following that performance and an impressive training camp he was officially named the Giants backup quarterback three weeks later.

Lorenzen made his first appearance on the field in a Giants uniform on December 30, 2006. During this game, he was used for one play, a quarterback sneak to make a first down on a third-and-one.[12]

Lorenzen made his second appearance on Sunday, January 7, 2007, in the Giants wild card loss against the Philadelphia Eagles. On the Giants opening drive, he lined up at quarterback on a third-and-one and got the first down, "shifting the pile" in the process, on the way to a Giants touchdown.[13] He also entered the game in the third quarter, but the Giants called a timeout and Manning took over at quarterback.

Lorenzen's first significant regular season appearance occurred on September 9, 2007, when he took over for the injured Manning in the fourth quarter of the season opener against the Dallas Cowboys.[14] Lorenzen made both his first regular season pass and rush, but failed to earn a first down. He did not see further action in the 2007 season as Manning's injury did not cost him any further playing time.

Lorenzen was released by the Giants on June 23, 2008.[15]

Indianapolis Colts

On July 24, 2008, Lorenzen was signed by the Indianapolis Colts.[16] He was waived during the final cuts for the 53-man roster.[17]

Kentucky Horsemen

On February 10, 2009, Lorenzen was assigned to the Kentucky Horsemen of af2.[18] The team went bankrupt and was dissolved in October 2009.[19]

Coaching

After the Horsemen folded, Lorenzen retired as a player. On March 23, 2010, he was hired as the quarterbacks coach at his alma mater, Highlands High School, in Fort Thomas, Kentucky.[20]

Northern Kentucky River Monsters

In 2011, Lorenzen went back to pro football, this time as working as the general manager of the Northern Kentucky River Monsters of the Ultimate Indoor Football League.[21] Still wanting to compete, Lorenzen resigned as GM to become the team's starting quarterback.[22] Lorenzen had a highly successful season, winning the league's MVP award.[23]

UIFL Commissioner

After gaining some positive press for his return to football, Lorenzen was named commissioner of the league after the 2011 season.[1]

Owensboro Rage

Still wanting to play, Lorenzen quit the UIFL's top job and signed with the Owensboro Rage of the Continental Indoor Football League partway through the 2013 season.[24] The Rage folded two weeks prior to the end of the season due to financial distress.

Return to the River Monsters

Lorenzen returned to the River Monsters, by this point a member of the Continental Indoor Football League, on December 17, 2013.[25] In Lorenzen's first game of the season, Lorenzen showed that he still had plenty of skill, side-stepping defenders. Lorenzen's play was filmed and the videos ended up all over the internet, overshadowing the River Monsters' 36–20 victory of the Bluegrass Warhorses.[26] The following week, however, Lorenzen broke his tibia in a 42–30 loss to the Erie Explosion, ending his season (and, to date, his pro playing career).[27][28]

Post-football career

Currently, Lorenzen is a guest host of the Lexington-based radio show Kentucky Sports Radio, mainly during UK Football season. In 2015, he also started his own T-shirt company known as ThrowboyTees.[29]

On July 28, 2017, Lorenzen launched "The Jared Lorenzen Project", where he will chronicle online his attempts at battling his obesity, now weighing over 500 lbs.[30][31] By April 2018, Lorenzen had lost over 100 pounds.[32] His story was documented by ESPN in July 2018.[33]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Reigning UIFL MVP Lorenzen named Commissioner". www.theuifl.com. Ultimate Indoor Football League. Archived from the original on November 19, 2011.
  2. ^ "Highlands' Smith 1st-team all-state". www.enquirer.com. The Cincinnati Enquirer. March 9, 1999. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Neil Schmidt (October 1, 1998). "Highlands QB commits to UK". www.enquirer.com. The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  4. ^ "Finalist named for Mr. Football". Daily News. December 13, 1998. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  5. ^ Neil Schmidt (December 23, 1998). "Lorenzen is Mr. Football". www.enquirer.com. The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  6. ^ Greg Dewalt (July 29, 2000). "New Kentucky quarterback Jared Lorenzen is... Large and in Charge". Times Daily. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  7. ^ Jack Thompson (June 11, 2000). "Qb Bonner Leaves Kentucky". www.chicagotribune.com. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  8. ^ Michael Conroy (February 21, 2004). "Lorenzen hopes to make it big in NFL". www.lubbockonline.com. Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  9. ^ "Jared Lorenzen Stats". www.sports-reference.com. USA TODAY Sports Digital Properties. Archived from the original on December 19, 2013. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  10. ^ "Giants sign Kentucky QB Jared Lorenzen". www.espn.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. April 27, 2004. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  11. ^ Branch, John (August 3, 2006). "Lorenzen Tries to Adapt to His Giants Family". Retrieved April 27, 2018 – via NYTimes.com.
  12. ^ "Giants vs. Redskins - Game Recap - December 30, 2006 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  13. ^ "Giants vs. Eagles - Game Recap - January 7, 2007 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  14. ^ Ralph Vacchiano (September 16, 2007). "Giants' QB Jared Lorenzen waiting for chance to start". www.nydailynews.com. NYDailyNews.com. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  15. ^ "Unknown". Archived from the original on June 28, 2008.
  16. ^ "Lorenzen signs with Colts". Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  17. ^ "Jared Lorenzen, QB, Free Agent". Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  18. ^ "Former NFL QB and Kentucky star Jared Lorenzen joins Horsemen; QB Justin Rascati also assigned to team". af2.com. af2. February 10, 2009. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved February 11, 2009.
  19. ^ "Horsemen forced to fold". Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  20. ^ "Jared Lorenzen New QB Coach at Highlands".
  21. ^ Rick Chandler (May 18, 2011). "Former Giants QB Jared Lorenzen still wingin' it, living large". www.nbcsports.com. NBC Sports. Archived from the original on December 19, 2013. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  22. ^ "Jared Lorenzen Returning To Football". lex18.com. LEX18. February 24, 2011. Archived from the original on September 28, 2011. Retrieved May 18, 2011.
  23. ^ "Unknown". www.theuifl.com. Ultimate Indoor Football League. Archived from the original on February 19, 2015.
  24. ^ Sean Edmondson (March 22, 2013). "Owensboro Rage signs former UK QB Jared Lorenzen". www.14news.com. WorldNow and WFIE. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  25. ^ "Super Bowl Champion Returns to River Monsters to "Finish What We Started"". www.oursportscentral.com. OurSports Central. December 18, 2013. Retrieved December 18, 2013.
  26. ^ Paul Dehner Jr. (February 9, 2014). "Jared Lorenzen's CIFL opening performance goes viral". www.cincinnati.com. Gannett. Retrieved February 11, 2014.
  27. ^ "Explosion knock off Northern Kentucky, knock out Lorenzen". www.goerie.com. Erie Times-News. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 10, 2014.
  28. ^ Jonathan Lintner (February 10, 2014). "Jared Lorenzen breaks leg in Sunday's Northern Kentucky River Monsters game". www.courier-journal.com. Gannett. Retrieved February 11, 2014.
  29. ^ "Guess who started a t-shirt company. Jared Lorenzen, that's who".
  30. ^ Sacks, Ethan, Now 500 pounds, former Giants QB Jared Lorenzen goes to battle against obesity, The Today Show, August 10, 2017. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  31. ^ "After weighing in at 500-plus pounds, Jared Lorenzen launches project to get healthy (Video)". Retrieved August 2, 2017.
  32. ^ "How Jared Lorenzen lost 100 pounds in a year". Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  33. ^ ESPN (July 19, 2018), Jared Lorenzen, a once in a generation athlete, now faces a battle for his life, E:60, ESPN, retrieved July 24, 2018

External links

Preceded by
Dennis Johnson
Kentucky Mr. Football
1998
Succeeded by
Travis Atwell
2002 All-SEC football team

The 2002 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by the Associated Press (AP) and the conference coaches for the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season.

The Georgia Bulldogs won the conference, beating the Arkansas Razorbacks 30 to 3 in the SEC Championship game. The Bulldogs went on to defeat the Florida State Seminoles 26 to 13 in the Sugar Bowl.

Georgia defensive end David Pollack was voted both the coaches SEC Player of the Year and AP SEC Defensive Player of the Year. Kentucky running back Artose Pinner was voted the AP SEC Offensive Player of the Year.

2003 Arkansas Razorbacks football team

The 2003 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas during the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Razorbacks played five home games at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, Arkansas and two home games at War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Seven Razorbacks were named to the 2003 All-SEC football team after the regular season: RB Cedric Cobbs, WR George Wilson, TE Jason Peters, OT Shawn Andrews, LB Caleb Miller, CB Ahmad Carroll, and S Tony Bua. Andrews was also awarded the Jacobs Blocking Trophy, given to the best offensive lineman in the SEC, for the second consecutive year. The Razorbacks were coached by head coach Houston Nutt.

2003 Arkansas vs. Kentucky football game

The 2003 Arkansas vs. Kentucky football game was a college football game played on November 1, 2003 between the University of Arkansas and the University of Kentucky; it tied a NCAA record for the longest ever played. The game included seven overtime periods. Arkansas led the game all but a few minutes of regulation until a Kentucky touchdown drive in the last few minutes. Both teams had a blocked punt recovered for a touchdown, another rarity. The game ended in the seventh overtime period when Kentucky quarterback Jared Lorenzen fumbled the football on a quarterback keeper play, ending the game.

2011 Northern Kentucky River Monsters season

The 2011 Northern Kentucky River Monsters season was the first season for the Ultimate Indoor Football League (UIFL) franchise. Announced as startup team for the newly formed Ultimate Indoor Football League in 2010, the team was purchased by Jill Chitwood from the UIFL in February 2011. Just a week before the season began, team General Manager, Jared Lorenzen, relieved himself of his duties as general manager, and became the quarterback for the franchise. In the River Monsters first ever game they defeated the Canton Cougars by a score of 63–41. With a Week 9 win over the Saginaw Sting, the River Monsters had clinched a postseason berth in their first season, clinching home field advantage throughout the playoffs. After wrapping up the season, the UIFL had discovered that the River Monsters had been paying their players over the league's salary cap. The UIFL stripped the River Monsters of the #1 seed and made them the #4 seed, taking away the River Monster's chance to earn playoff money. The River Monster now traveled to Saginaw, Michigan to play the Sting, where the Sting upset the River Monsters 48–47. On June 6, 2011, it was announced that the UIFL and the River Monsters mutually agreed to part ways, leaving the team free to join another league. However, the UIFL had a lease agreement with the arena, which hampered the likelihood the River Monsters would play in Highland Heights in 2012. The team had been mentioned as a charter member Stadius Football Association, but that league never got off the ground.

2011 UIFL season

The 2011 Ultimate Indoor Football League season was the first season of the league. The regular season lasted from February 18 to May 29 and the postseason, will be held the following two weeks with the championship game being held at the highest remaining seed. The 2011 season went off without any teams folding or any games being missed or rescheduled. The Northern Kentucky River Monsters finished with the best regular season record, finished 11–3. However, due to league sanctions they were not able to host an playoff games and were dropped to a four seed.

Saginaw finished 9–5, followed by Eastern Kentucky 8–6, Huntington 7–7, Johnstown 6–8 and Canton 1–13.

Saginaw defeated Northern Kentucky, 48–47, in the first semifinals of the Ultimate Bowl I Playoffs, sponsored by Trophy Awards. In the other semifinal game, Eastern Kentucky advanced to the championship game with a 20–4 victory over Huntington. The 2011 Ultimate Bowl, sponsored by Trophy Awards, was played Friday, June 9 at the Dow Center in Saginaw, MI with the Sting claiming an 86–69 victory over the visiting Drillers.Following the elimination of the Northern Kentucky River Monsters from the playoffs, NKY owner Jill Chitwood and the UIFL came to terms that allowed the River Monsters to leave the UIFL, but the team folded after rumors of joining the Continental Indoor Football League.

2013 Owensboro Rage season

The 2013 Owensboro Rage season was the second and final season for the Continental Indoor Football League (CIFL) franchise.

On July 13, 2012, owner and general manager Eddie Cronin died in an automobile accident. On August 8, 2012, the Rage confirmed that they would continue to be a part of the CIFL again in 2013, with Cronin's fiancé, Melissa Logsdon running the team. The season will be dedicated to Cronin. On September 27, 2012, Logsdon announced that the team would be moving to Owensboro, Kentucky. The Rage also named Kory White as General Manager the same day. The Rage signed former Louisville quarterback Bill Ashburn as well as former Arena Football League wide receiver Robert Redd to get the team's offense going.After starting off 2-0, the Rage lost three straight games. To help the floundering team, the Rage signed Jared Lorenzen to help solidify the quarterback position. Lorenzen helped the Rage instantly by helping the Rage win a close game with the Marion Blue Racers. The Rage received two automatic victories from the folding of the Kane County Dawgs, bringing their record to 5-3, but with two games remaining in the season, the Rage suspended operations due to lack of funds. The Rage forfeit their final two games of the season, making their record 5-5.

2014 Northern Kentucky River Monsters season

The 2014 Northern Kentucky River Monsters season was the second and final season for the Continental Indoor Football League (CIFL) franchise.

After a two-year layoff, the River Monsters announced that they would be returning to an active team, joining the Continental Indoor Football League for the 2014 season. Head coach Brian Schmidt was fired on February 22, and was replaced by defensive coordinator Mike Goodpaster. Goodpaster was able to salvage the season after losing quarterback Jared Lorenzen to injury in Week 2, going 5–2 down the stretch, defeating the Dayton Sharks the final week of the season to clinch the final South Division playoff spot.

DeQwan Young

DeQwan Young (born November 12, 1986) is an American football defensive back who is currently a free agent. He was also the defensive backs coach for the Seton Hill University.

Derek Smith (tight end)

Derek Smith (born October 1, 1980 in Silver Grove, Kentucky) is an athlete who has played American football and basketball. He played for the Highlands Bluebirds under head coach Dale Mueller. Smith, a tight end, and quarterback Jared Lorenzen, formerly of the New York Giants, led Highlands to two Kentucky class 3A state championships. In a single game against rival Scott High School, Smith caught 7 passes for 325 yards and 5 receiving touchdowns, which is still a KHSAA state record.

Derek went on to play three years for the University of Kentucky Wildcats, where he set many school and SEC records for a tight end. Smith left Kentucky after three years to enter the NFL Draft. Listed at 6'4" 263 lb (119 kg), Smith signed with the Indianapolis Colts practice squad and later signed with the St. Louis Rams and the Cincinnati Bengals.

After he was released by the Bengals, Smith went back to college at Northern Kentucky University where he played basketball for the Norse in 2004.

Dusty Bonner

Dusty Bonner (born October 27, 1978) is a former American football quarterback. He was a standout Harlon Hill Trophy winner in 2000 and 2001 while playing for Valdosta State University, and was signed as an undrafted free agent in 2002 by the Atlanta Falcons.

Fort Thomas, Kentucky

Fort Thomas is a home rule-class city in Campbell County, Kentucky, United States, on the southern bank of the Ohio River and the site of an 1890 US Army post. The population was 16,325 at the 2010 census, making it the largest city in Campbell County and it is officially part of the Cincinnati – Northern Kentucky metropolitan area.

Highlands High School (Fort Thomas, Kentucky)

Fort Thomas Highlands High School, also known as Fort Thomas Highlands, is a Semi-Private secondary school located in Fort Thomas, Kentucky. Operated by Fort Thomas Independent Schools, Highlands was founded in 1888. The school took its name from the original name of Fort Thomas, "The Highlands". It currently has around 900 students in grades 9-12.

Josh Betts

Joshua Kane Betts (born August 25, 1982) is a former American football quarterback. He played college football for the Miami RedHawks and was signed by the Indianapolis Colts as an undrafted free agent in 2006.

Betts has also been a member of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats.

Kentucky Wildcats football statistical leaders

The Kentucky Wildcats football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Kentucky Wildcats football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, kicking, and scoring. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Wildcats represent the University of Kentucky in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Kentucky began competing in intercollegiate football in 1892, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1946. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists. For example, Cecil Tuttle rushed for 6 touchdowns against Maryland in 1907, but complete records for the era are unavailable.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Wildcats have played in eight bowl games since this decision, giving many recent players an extra game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

List of left-handed quarterbacks

This is a list of notable left-handed quarterbacks who have played professionally or for a major college program. In gridiron football, quarterbacks have been predominantly right-handed with a few notable exceptions. While left-dominant people make up 10% of the general population, only 0.85% of NFL pass-throwers were left-handed in 2017. With Kellen Moore's retirement after that year, there are currently none in the NFL as of 2019.Former NFL quarterback and current analyst David Carr cited a lower number of left-handed quarterbacks to be due to the fact that plays are usually drawn assuming a right-handed pass-thrower, which may explain some struggles left-handed quarterbacks have. However, a number of left-handed throwers have been successful quarterbacks, including Mark Brunell, Tim Tebow and Michael Vick, and two, Ken Stabler and Steve Young, have reached the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Morgan Newton

Morgan Newton is a former American football tight end. Newton played college football for the Kentucky Wildcats.

Northern Kentucky River Monsters

The Northern Kentucky River Monsters were a professional indoor football team based in Highland Heights, Kentucky. The River Monsters began play as a charter member of the Ultimate Indoor Football League (UIFL) for its inaugural 2011 season spending one season in the UIFL before reaching an agreement with league management to leave. After a two-year hiatus, the River Monsters returned in 2014 as a member of the South Division of the Continental Indoor Football League (CIFL). The River Monsters played their home games at The Bank of Kentucky Center. On June 6, 2011, it was announced that the UIFL and the River Monsters mutually agreed to part ways, leaving the team free to join another league. However, the UIFL had a lease agreement with the arena, which hampered the likelihood the River Monsters would play in Highland Heights in 2012. The team had been mentioned as a charter member Stadius Football Association in 2012, but that league never got off the ground. The team suspended operations on October 1, 2014.

Owensboro Rage

The Owensboro Rage, formerly the Evansville Rage, was a professional indoor football team based in Owensboro, Kentucky. The team was a member of the Continental Indoor Football League. The Rage joined the CIFL in 2012 as an expansion team. The Rage were the first indoor football team to be based in Owensboro. The Rage were founded in 2011 by David Reed. Reed stepped down as President and General Manager in March 2012 due to lack of funds. In 2013 the owner of the Rage became Melissa Logsdon. The Rage played their home games at The Next Level Sports Facility.

Tony Franklin (American football coach)

Tony Franklin (born August 29, 1957) is an American football coach, currently serving as the offensive coordinator for the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders of Conference USA after making a move from the same position with the California Golden Bears.Franklin was previously the quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator of the Auburn University football team, before being fired from that position on October 8, 2008. Franklin is known for his expertise in the spread offense and for developing quarterbacks. Under his guidance, quarterbacks Tim Couch, Dusty Bonner, and Jared Lorenzen each led the SEC in passing, with Couch becoming the first player selected in the 1999 NFL Draft.

While a running back in college at Murray State in 1977, Franklin was a teammate of fellow future coach Bud Foster, who later came to prominence as the Virginia Tech defensive coordinator.

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