Jamling Tenzing Norgay

Jamling Tenzing Norgay (Nepali: जम्लिंग तेन्जिंग नोर्गे; born 23 April 1965) is a Nepali Sherpa mountain climber.[1]

Jamling Tenzing Norgay
Island peak summit
Jameling Tenzing Norgay at the Island Peak summit
Born23 April 1965 (age 53)
OccupationMountaineer/ Motivational Speaker
Spouse(s)Sonam Yangchen
ChildrenDeki Tenzing, Dechen Tenzing, Pelzom Tenzing
Parent(s)Tenzing Norgay
Daku
Jamling with HH Dalai Lama
Jamling Tenzing Norgay with Dalai Lama

Biography

Norgay is the son of Nepali mountaineer and guide Tenzing Norgay (who first climbed Mount Everest in 1953 with Sir Edmund Hillary) and Daku, his third wife. Jamling Tenzing Norgay himself later followed in his father's footsteps and climbed Everest in 1996 with a team led by David Breashears that also included mountaineer Ed Viesturs and Araceli Segarra, an experience documented in the 1998 IMAX film Everest. In 2002, he and Peter Hillary, the son of Edmund Hillary, were part of an expedition to climb Everest and commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first ascent.[2]

Norgay went on to write Touching My Father's Soul, a book documenting his experiences on the summit attempt. The book was notable for the frankness with which it discussed the relationship between the often wealthy climbers and the Sherpas who obtain their incomes from assisting expeditions. Norgay's book was the first to discuss from the Sherpas' point of view of the disastrous May 1996 climbing season, in which twelve climbers died. It noted, for example, that little notice is taken when Sherpas die, but much attention is focused when those lost are clients.[2]

Norgay is an alumnus of Northland College.[1]

Bibliography

  • Norgay, Jamling Tenzing (2001), Touching my father's soul: a Sherpa's journey to the top of Everest (reprint ed.), HarperSanFrancisco, ISBN 978-0-06-251688-6
  • Hartemann, Frederic V.; Hauptman, Robert; Norgay, Jamling Tenzing (2005), The mountain encyclopedia: an A-Z compendium of more than 2,300 terms, concepts, ideas, and people, Taylor Trade, ISBN 978-1-58979-161-9
Jamling-Tenzing-Norgay-with-Prime-Minister-India-and-Edmund-Hillary
In 2003, Jamling Tenzing Norgay and Sir Edmund Hillary receiving Everest 50 Years Award from Prime Minister of India

References

  1. ^ a b Reuters. "Britain's Queen Elizabeth meets Nepalese Sherpa mountain climber Jamling Norgay, son of Tenzing Norgay, during a reception to celebrate the 60th Anniversary of the ascent of Mount Everest in London". trust.org/Thomson Reuters Foundation News. Retrieved 24 October 2018.
  2. ^ a b Everest Anniversary Team Makes Final Summit Attempt, National Geographic News, 23 May 2002. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
1965 in India

Events in the year 1965 in the Republic of India.

Edmund Hillary

Sir Edmund Percival Hillary (20 July 1919 – 11 January 2008) was a New Zealand mountaineer, explorer, and philanthropist. On 29 May 1953, Hillary and Nepalese Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay became the first climbers confirmed to have reached the summit of Mount Everest. They were part of the ninth British expedition to Everest, led by John Hunt. From 1985 to 1988 he served as New Zealand's High Commissioner to India and Bangladesh and concurrently as Ambassador to Nepal.

Hillary became interested in mountaineering while in secondary school. He made his first major climb in 1939, reaching the summit of Mount Ollivier. He served in the Royal New Zealand Air Force as a navigator during World War II. Prior to the Everest expedition, Hillary had been part of the British reconnaissance expedition to the mountain in 1951 as well as an unsuccessful attempt to climb Cho Oyu in 1952. As part of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition he reached the South Pole overland in 1958. He subsequently reached the North Pole, making him the first person to reach both poles and summit Everest.

Following his ascent of Everest, Hillary devoted himself to assisting the Sherpa people of Nepal through the Himalayan Trust, which he established. His efforts are credited with the construction of many schools and hospitals in Nepal. Hillary had numerous honours conferred upon him, including the Order of the Garter in 1995. Upon his death in 2008, he was given a state funeral in New Zealand.

Everest (1998 film)

Everest is a 70mm American documentary film, from MacGillivray Freeman Films, about the struggles involved in climbing Mount Everest, the highest mountain peak on Earth, located in the Himalayan region of Nepal. It was released to IMAX theaters in March 1998 and became the highest-grossing film made in the IMAX format.

Incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China

The incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China, (called the Chinese invasion of Tibet by the Tibetan Government in Exile; called "peaceful liberation of Tibet" in China), was the process by which the People's Republic of China (PRC) gained control of Tibet. These regions came under the control of China after attempts by the Government of Tibet to gain international recognition, efforts to modernize its military, negotiations between the Government of Tibet and the PRC, a military conflict in the Qamdo area of Western Kham in October 1950, and the eventual acceptance of the Seventeen Point Agreement by the Government of Tibet under Chinese pressure in October 1951. In the West, it is generally believed that China annexed Tibet. The Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structure remained in place in the Tibetan Autonomous Region under the authority of China until the 1959 Tibetan uprising, when the Dalai Lama fled into exile and after which the Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structures were dissolved.

Jim Clash

James Michael "Jim" Clash is an American participatory adventure journalist and author. He has engaged in some of the world’s most daring exploits and lived to write about them. He has written for Forbes, AskMen, Huffington Post, Bloomberg Businessweek, and Automobile Magazine. He has written three books: Forbes To The Limits, The Right Stuff: Interviews With Icons Of The 1960's, and The Right Stuff: Interviews With Icons Of The 1970's/1980's. Jim is a Fellow and former Board Member of The Explorers Club and is also ticket holder 610 on Virgin Galactic for a flight to space.

List of 20th-century summiters of Mount Everest

Mount Everest, at 8,848 metres (29,029 ft) is currently the world's highest mountain range and has now become a particularly desirable peak for mountaineers. This is a list of people who reached the summit of Mount Everest in the 20th century. Overall about 1,383 people summited Everest between 1953 and the end of 2000. After 2000, the number of summiters greatly increased when ascending the mountain became more accessible and more popular. By 2013, 6,871 summits had been recorded by 4,042 different people.

List of Nepalese people

This is a list of notable Nepali people.

List of climbers and mountaineers

This list of climbers and mountaineers is a list of people notable for the activities of mountaineering, rock climbing (including bouldering) and ice climbing.

Mount Everest

Mount Everest, known in Nepali as Sagarmatha (सगरमाथा) and in Tibetan as Chomolungma (ཇོ་མོ་གླང་མ), is Earth's highest mountain above sea level, located in the Mahalangur Himal sub-range of the Himalayas. The international border between Nepal (Province No. 1) and China (Tibet Autonomous Region) runs across its summit point.

The current official elevation of 8,848 m (29,029 ft), recognized by China and Nepal, was established by a 1955 Indian survey and subsequently confirmed by a Chinese survey in 1975. In 2005, China remeasured the rock height of the mountain, with a result of 8844.43 m (29,017 ft). There followed an argument between China and Nepal as to whether the official height should be the rock height (8,844 m, China) or the snow height (8,848 m, Nepal). In 2010, an agreement was reached by both sides that the height of Everest is 8,848 m, and Nepal recognizes China's claim that the rock height of Everest is 8,844 m.In 1865, Everest was given its official English name by the Royal Geographical Society, upon a recommendation by Andrew Waugh, the British Surveyor General of India. As there appeared to be several different local names, Waugh chose to name the mountain after his predecessor in the post, Sir George Everest, despite Everest's objections.Mount Everest attracts many climbers, some of them highly experienced mountaineers. There are two main climbing routes, one approaching the summit from the southeast in Nepal (known as the "standard route") and the other from the north in Tibet. While not posing substantial technical climbing challenges on the standard route, Everest presents dangers such as altitude sickness, weather, and wind, as well as significant hazards from avalanches and the Khumbu Icefall. As of 2017, nearly 300 people have died on Everest, many of whose bodies remain on the mountain.The first recorded efforts to reach Everest's summit were made by British mountaineers. As Nepal did not allow foreigners into the country at the time, the British made several attempts on the north ridge route from the Tibetan side. After the first reconnaissance expedition by the British in 1921 reached 7,000 m (22,970 ft) on the North Col, the 1922 expedition pushed the north ridge route up to 8,320 m (27,300 ft), marking the first time a human had climbed above 8,000 m (26,247 ft). Seven porters were killed in an avalanche on the descent from the North Col. The 1924 expedition resulted in one of the greatest mysteries on Everest to this day: George Mallory and Andrew Irvine made a final summit attempt on 8 June but never returned, sparking debate as to whether or not they were the first to reach the top. They had been spotted high on the mountain that day but disappeared in the clouds, never to be seen again, until Mallory's body was found in 1999 at 8,155 m (26,755 ft) on the north face. Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary made the first official ascent of Everest in 1953, using the southeast ridge route. Norgay had reached 8,595 m (28,199 ft) the previous year as a member of the 1952 Swiss expedition. The Chinese mountaineering team of Wang Fuzhou, Gonpo, and Qu Yinhua made the first reported ascent of the peak from the north ridge on 25 May 1960.

Norgay

Norgay may refer to:

Nepalese-Sherpa descended mountaineers:

Tenzing Norgay (1915–1986), for whom it was a given name, often mistaken for a surname

Tenzing Montes (formerly called 'Norgay Montes') mounts on Pluto in honour of Tenzing Norgay

Jamling Tenzing Norgay (born 1965), who intentionally uses it as a surname

Northland College (Wisconsin)

Northland College is a private college in Ashland, Wisconsin. Founded as the North Wisconsin Academy in 1892, the college was established in 1906. Originally affiliated with the Congregational Church, the college remains loosely tied to the Congregational Church's descendant, the United Church of Christ. It enrolls 600 full-time undergraduate students and employs 60 faculty members and 99 staff members. Northland College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities.

Sherpa people

Sherpa is one of the major ethnic groups native to the most mountainous regions of Nepal, as well as certain areas of China, Bhutan, India, and the Himalayas. The term sherpa or sherwa derives from the Sherpa language words Shar ("east") and Wa ("people"), which refer to their geographical origin in Kham Salmogang of eastern Tibet.

Most Sherpa people live in the eastern regions of Nepal; however, some live farther west in the Rolwaling Valley and in the Helambu region north of Kathmandu. Sherpas had village gompas (temples) where they practised their religious traditions. Tengboche was the first celibate monastery in Solu-Khumbu. Sherpa people also live in China, Bhutan, and the Indian states of Sikkim and the northern portion of West Bengal, specifically the district of Darjeeling. The Sherpa language belongs to the south branch of the Tibeto-Burman languages, and it is a mixed Eastern Tibet (Khamba) and central Tibetan dialects. However, this language is separate from Lhasa Tibetan and unintelligible to Lhasa speakers.The number of Sherpas migrating to Western countries has significantly increased in recent years, especially to the United States. New York City has the largest Sherpa community in the United States, with a population of approximately 3,000. The 2001 Nepal census recorded 154,622 Sherpas within its borders. Some members of the Sherpa population are known for their skills in mountaineering as a livelihood.

St. Paul's School, Darjeeling

St. Paul's School is an independent boarding school for boys in the town of Darjeeling, West Bengal, India. Entrance tests for admission are held every September. The school follows the ICSE curriculum till the class 10 and the ISC for higher secondary (classes 11 and 12).

Tenzing (name)

Tenzing is a Nepalese name. Notable people with the name include:

Tenzing Norgay (1914–1986), Nepalese mountaineer in the first Everest ascent.

Jamling Tenzing Norgay (born 1965), Nepalese mountaineer (son of Tenzing Norgay)

Tashi Tenzing (born 1965), Nepalese mountaineer (maternal grandson of Tenzing Norgay)

Tenzing Norgay

Tenzing Norgay (; Sherpa: བསྟན་འཛིན་ནོར་རྒྱས tendzin norgyé; 29 May 1914 – 9 May 1986), born Namgyal Wangdi and often referred to as Sherpa Tenzing, was a Nepali-Indian Sherpa mountaineer. He was one of the first two individuals known to reach the summit of Mount Everest, which he accomplished with Edmund Hillary on 29 May 1953. Time named him one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century.

Timeline of Mount Everest expeditions

Mount Everest is the world's highest mountain, with a peak at 8,848 metres (29,029 ft) above sea level. It is situated in the Himalayan range.

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