James Kimbrough Jones

James Kimbrough Jones (September 29, 1839 – June 1, 1908) was a Confederate Army veteran, plantation owner, lawyer, US Congressional Representative, United States Senator and chairman of the Democratic National Committee from Arkansas.

James Jones
James Jones
Chairman of the Senate Democratic Caucus
In office
December 1899 – March 4, 1903
Preceded byDavid Turpie
Succeeded byArthur Pue Gorman
Chair of the Democratic National Committee
In office
1896–1904
Preceded byWilliam F. Harrity
Succeeded byThomas Taggart
United States Senator
from Arkansas
In office
March 4, 1885 – March 4, 1903
Preceded byJames D. Walker
Succeeded byJames Paul Clarke
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arkansas's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1881 – February 19, 1885
Preceded byWilliam F. Slemons
Succeeded byClifton R. Breckinridge
Personal details
Born
James Kimbrough Jones

September 29, 1839
Marshall County, Mississippi, U.S.
DiedJune 1, 1908 (aged 68)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Military service
Allegiance Confederate States
Branch/service Confederate States Army
RankPrivate
Unit3rd Arkansas Cavalry[1]
Battles/warsAmerican Civil War

Biography

Born in Marshall County, Mississippi, Jones moved with his father to Dallas County, Arkansas in 1848. He pursued classical studies under a private tutor; he would later study law and was, in 1874, admitted to the bar, practicing in Washington, Arkansas.[2]

During the American Civil War, Jones served in the Confederate States Army|Confederate Army, and returned to his Arkansas plantation afterward. From 1873 to 1879, he was a member of the Arkansas State Senate, and was president of that body from 1877 to 1879. In 1896 and 1900, he was the chairman of the Democratic National Committee.[2]

Mary Jones
Mary Jones, daughter of James Kimbrough Jones

Jones was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth Congresses (March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1885); he was re-elected to the Forty-ninth but tendered his resignation on February 19, 1885, having been elected to the United States Senate that year. Jones was reelected in 1891 and 1897 and served from March 4, 1885, to March 3, 1903, unsuccessfully seeking reelection in 1902. While in the Senate, he was chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs (Fifty-third Congress), Committee on Corporations Organized in the District of Columbia (Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Congresses), Committee on Private Land Claims (Fifty-fifth Congress.)[2]

After his Congressional service, Jones resumed the practice of law in Washington, D.C., where he died; he was buried in Rock Creek Cemetery.[3]

References

  1. ^ "James Kimbrough Jones". Butler Center for Arkansas Studies. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Jones, James Kimbrough". United States Congress. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  3. ^ "James Kimbrough Jones". Find A Grave. Retrieved 28 September 2018.

Sources

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
William F. Slemons
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arkansas's 2nd congressional district

1881–1885
Succeeded by
Clifton R. Breckinridge
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
James D. Walker
U.S. Senator (Class 3) from Arkansas
1885–1903
Served alongside: Augustus Garland, James Berry
Succeeded by
James Paul Clarke
Preceded by
Henry L. Dawes
Chair of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee
1893–1895
Succeeded by
Richard F. Pettigrew
Preceded by
Nelson W. Aldrich
Chair of the Senate District of Columbia Corporations Committee
1895–1897
Succeeded by
John W. Daniel
Preceded by
Isham G. Harris
Chair of the Senate Private Land Claims Committee
1898–1899
Succeeded by
Henry M. Teller
Party political offices
Preceded by
William F. Harrity
Chair of the Democratic National Committee
1896–1904
Succeeded by
Thomas Taggart
Preceded by
David Turpie
Chair of the Senate Democratic Caucus
1899–1903
Succeeded by
Arthur Pue Gorman
1839 in the United States

Events from the year 1839 in the United States.

1908 in the United States

Events from the year 1908 in the United States.

Arthur Pue Gorman

Arthur Pue Gorman (March 11, 1839 – June 4, 1906) was a United States Senator from Maryland, serving from 1881 to 1899 and from 1903 to 1906. He also served in the Maryland House of Delegates from 1869 to 1875, and the Maryland State Senate to 1881. He was a prominent leader of the Bourbon Democrat faction in the Democratic Party and later served as a member of the Mills Commission which investigated the origins of the sport of baseball and established its inventor.

David Turpie

David Battle Turpie (July 8, 1828 – April 21, 1909) was an American politician who served as a Senator from Indiana from 1887 until 1899; he also served as Chairman of the Senate Democratic Caucus from 1898 to 1899 during the last year of his tenure in the Senate.

Turpie was born in Hamilton County, Ohio. He grew up in Ohio and graduated from Kenyon College in 1848. He studied law and moved to Logansport, Indiana where he set up a law practice. He soon became active in the United States Democratic Party to which he would belong for the rest of his life.

Turpie was elected to the state legislature at the age of 24 in 1852. He served one term and then returned to practicing law. In 1854 he became a common pleas judge and in 1856 he became a state circuit court judge. In 1858 he was elected to the state legislature again for one year.

He was the Democratic candidate for the U.S. House seat held by Schuyler Colfax in 1862, losing only narrowly. Shortly thereafter, Turpie was elected to the United States Senate from Indiana in January 1863, to fill the unexpired term of Jesse D. Bright who had been expelled for alleged disloyalty. The term was nearly complete, however, so Turpie only served in the Senate for one month. He returned to practicing law.

Turpie moved to Indianapolis, Indiana in 1872. He was again elected to the state legislature and served as speaker of the Assembly from 1874 to 1875. He served as the United States District Attorney for Indiana from 1886 to 1887.

In 1887, Turpie was again elected to the United States Senate from Indiana, this time for a full term. He defeated Benjamin Harrison who would soon become the President of the United States. His return to the U.S. Senate, after 24 years and 1 day out of office, marks the third longest gap in service to the chamber in history. Turpie was reelected in 1893 and served in the Senate for 12 years, from 1887 to 1899. As a senator, he served as chairman of the Committee on the Census from 1893 to 1895, chairman of the Democratic Conference from 1898 to 1899, and supported a plebiscite on annexation for the people of Hawaii rather than forced annexation. Turpie was defeated for reelection by Albert J. Beveridge. He retired from public life and died in Indianapolis.

Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies

A Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies is a special committee of the United States Congress formed every four years to manage presidential inaugurations.

A committee has been formed every four years since at least the 1901 inauguration of William McKinley.The members are sitting members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives. Typically, the House members include the Speaker of the House as well as the House majority and minority leaders. The Senate members are drawn from the leadership of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration (previously known by other names). A senator acts as Chairman of the Joint Committee; the chairman is therefore drawn from the party in control of the Senate, which may or may not be the same party as the president-elect's. Membership in the committee gives its members the opportunity to control tickets to the inauguration ceremonies.

Kimbrough

Kimbrough is both a surname and a given name. Notable people with the name include:

Surname:

Charles Kimbrough (born 1936), actor

Clint Kimbrough (1933–1996), actor

Elbert Kimbrough (born 1938), American football player

Emily Kimbrough (1899–1989), co-author of Our Hearts Were Young and Gay

Frank Kimbrough (born 1956), jazz pianist

Frank Kimbrough (American football) (1904–1971), American football player

John Kimbrough (1918–2006), Texas athlete and politician

Junior Kimbrough (1930–1998), blues musician

Lottie Kimbrough (1900–unknown), American country blues singer

Mary Craig Sinclair (1882–1961), née Kimbrough, writer, wife of Upton Sinclair

Newman W. Kimbrough (1900-1975), American law enforcement, President FBI National Academy 1949-1957 (Longest tenure as President of FBI NA), from Alabama

Robert Shane Kimbrough (born 1967), astronaut

Seth Kimbrough (born 1982), musician and BMX rider

Stan Kimbrough (born 1966), basketball player

Tony Kimbrough (born 1964), American football player

Will Kimbrough (born 1964), singer-songwriterGiven name:

James Kimbrough Jones (1839–1908), United States Senator

Duke Kimbrough McCall (1914-2013), religious leader

Kimbrough Stone (1875–1958), United States federal judge

List of Freemasons (E–Z)

This is a list of notable Freemasons. Freemasonry is a fraternal organisation that exists in a number of forms worldwide. Throughout history some members of the fraternity have made no secret of their involvement, while others have not made their membership public. In some cases, membership can only be proven by searching through the fraternity's records. Such records are most often kept at the individual lodge level, and may be lost due to fire, flood, deterioration, or simple carelessness. Grand Lodge governance may have shifted or reorganized, resulting in further loss of records on the member or the name, number, location or even existence of the lodge in question. In areas of the world where Masonry has been suppressed by governments, records of entire grand lodges have been destroyed. Because of this, masonic membership can sometimes be difficult to verify.

Standards of "proof" for those on this list may vary widely; some figures with no verified lodge affiliation are claimed as Masons if reliable sources give anecdotal evidence suggesting they were familiar with the "secret" signs and passes, but other figures are rejected over technical questions of regularity in the lodge that initiated them. Where available, specific lodge membership information is provided; where serious questions of verification have been noted by other sources, this is also indicated.

List of United States Representatives from Arkansas

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Arkansas. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state (through the present day), see United States Congressional Delegations from Arkansas. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

List of former members of the United States House of Representatives (J)

This is a complete list of former members of the United States House of Representatives whose last names begin with the letter J.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 47th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 47th United States Congress listed by seniority.

As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 47th Congress (March 4, 1881 – March 3, 1883). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

List of members of the United States House of Representatives in the 48th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States House of Representatives during the 48th United States Congress listed by seniority.

As an historical article, the districts and party affiliations listed reflect those during the 48th Congress (March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1885). Current seats and party affiliations on the List of current members of the United States House of Representatives by seniority will be different for certain members.Seniority depends on the date on which members were sworn into office. Since many members are sworn in on the same day, subsequent ranking is based on previous congressional service of the individual and then by alphabetical order by the last name of the congressman.

Committee chairmanship in the House is often associated with seniority. However, party leadership is typically not associated with seniority.

Note: The "*" indicates that the representative/delegate may have served one or more non-consecutive terms while in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress.

Oak Grove Missionary Baptist Church

The Oak Grove Missionary Baptist Church is a historic church on Hempstead County Route 16, about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of the small town of Blevins, Arkansas. It is a single-story wood frame structure, with a Jerkinhead roof, and a steeple topped by a hip roof. It was built in 1942, using in part materials recycled from an 1870 church which was dismantled due to the establishment of the Southwestern Proving Ground in 1940. The church serves an African-American congregation that was, prior to its relocation, in a community that was originally named for, and supported by, Arkansas Senator James Kimbrough Jones. The church property includes a small wood-frame Sunday school building, constructed about the same time as the church, and a cemetery.The church was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

Political party strength in Arkansas

The following table indicates the party of elected officials in the U.S. state of Arkansas:

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Secretary of State

Attorney General

State Auditor

State Treasurer

State Land CommissionerThe table also indicates the historical party composition in the:

State Senate

State House of Representatives

State delegation to the United States Senate

State delegation to the United States House of RepresentativesFor years in which a United States presidential election was held, the table indicates which party's nominees received the state's electoral votes.

The parties are as follows: American Independent (AI), Democratic (D), Green (G), Independent (I), no party (N), Republican (R), Whig (W), and a tie or coalition within a group of elected officials.

Rock Creek Cemetery

Rock Creek Cemetery is an 86-acre (350,000 m2) cemetery with a natural and rolling landscape located at Rock Creek Church Road, NW, and Webster Street, NW, off Hawaii Avenue, NE, in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington, D.C., United States. It is across the street from the historic Soldiers' Home and the Soldiers' Home Cemetery. It also is home to the InterFaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington. On August 12, 1977, Rock Creek Cemetery and the adjacent church grounds were listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Rock Creek Church Yard and Cemetery.

Senate Democratic Caucus

The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate, sometimes referred to as the Democratic Conference, is the formal organization of all senators who are part of the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. For the makeup of the 116th Congress, the conference additionally includes two independent senators (Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Angus King of Maine) who formally caucus with the Democrats for the purpose of committee assignments and structural organization, bringing the current total to 47 members. The central organizational front for Democrats in the senate, its primary function is communicating the party's message to all of its members under a single banner.

Thomas Taggart

Thomas Taggart (November 17, 1856 – March 6, 1929) was the political boss of the Democratic Party in Indiana for the first quarter of the twentieth century and remained an influential political figure in local, state, and national politics until his death. Taggart was elected auditor of Marion County, Indiana (1886–1894) and mayor of Indianapolis (1895 to 1901). His mayoral administration supported public improvements, most notably the formation of the city's park and boulevard system. He also served as a member of the Democratic National Committee (1900–1916) and as its chairman (1904–1908). Taggart was appointed to the U.S. Senate in March 1916, but lost the seat in the November election.

Taggart, an Irish-born immigrant, came to the United States in 1861 at the age of five, grew up in Xenia, Ohio, and moved to Indiana as a teenager. After relocating to Indianapolis in 1877, he began a successful career as an hotelier, financier, and politician. As the party's county chairman during Grover Cleveland's 1888 presidential campaign, Taggart helped him carry Marion County over Republican Benjamin Harrison, the hometown candidate. As state chairman in 1892, Taggart helped Cleveland carry Indiana in opposition to Harrison’s bid for reelection. In 1908 Taggart assisted in securing the Democratic nomination of John W. Kern for U.S. vice president and Thomas R. Marshall for governor of Indiana. He was also involved in securing the nomination of Woodrow Wilson for U.S. president and Marshall for vice president in 1912, as well as James M. Cox's nomination in the 1920 presidential election. In addition to his political activities, Taggart was the owner and developer of the French Lick Springs Hotel in Orange County, Indiana; he also maintained a summer home at Hyannis Port, Massachusetts.

United States congressional delegations from Arkansas

These are tables of congressional delegations from Arkansas to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Class 2
Class 3
Full Committee
(1820–1947)
Select Committee
(1977–1993)
Full Committee
(1993–)
Chairpersons
of the DNC
Presidential
tickets
State and
Territorial
Parties
Conventions
(List)
Affiliated
groups
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