James B. Steele

James B. Steele (born January 3, 1943) is an American investigative journalist and author. With longtime collaborator Donald L. Barlett he has won two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Magazine Awards and five George Polk Awards during their thirty five years of service at The Philadelphia Inquirer, Time, and Vanity Fair. The duo are frequently referred to as Barlett and Steele.

Steele was born in Hutchinson, Kansas and was raised in Kansas City, Missouri. He graduated from the University of Missouri–Kansas City and began his career at the Kansas City Times, where he covered politics, labor and urban affairs. In 1970 he joined The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he would begin his collaboration with Barlett.

In a 1972 collaboration for The Philadelphia Inquirer, Steele and Barlett pioneered the use of computers for the analysis of data on violent crimes. Their story, "Auditing the IRS," earned them a Gerald Loeb Special Award in 1975.[1][2] Twenty years later, they co-authored the series America: What Went Wrong? for The Inquirer, which was named as one of the 100 best pieces of journalism of the 20th century by the New York University School of Journalism. Rewritten into book form, America: What Went Wrong? became a No. 1 New York Times bestseller. It is one of seven books Steele and Barlett have published. In 1989, he and Barlett won the Pulitzer Prize and the Gerald Loeb Award for Large Newspapers[1] for their reporting on the Tax Reform Act of 1986.[3]

Barlett and Steele left The Philadelphia Inquirer to become editors-at-large at Time Inc. in 1997. While at Time, they won two National Magazine Awards, the first in 1999 for their three-part series, “What Corporate Welfare Costs You," and the second in 2001 for their three-part series in 2000 on campaign finance.[4]

In 2006 Barlett and Steele left Time and were hired by Vanity Fair to be contributing editors on the understanding that they would contribute two articles each year. They were available for this new assignment after Time determined that they had insufficient space for the time of long journalistic investigations. In 2007, Barlett and Steele were featured in the PBS documentary series, Exposé: America's Investigative Reports, in an episode entitled "Friends In High Places."

In January 2017, it was reported that CNN, as part of "a major new initiative in investigative reporting," was hiring Steele along with fellow Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Bernstein as contributing editors, "to advise the team on their work and executives on hiring."[5]

Steele is married and has a daughter. His sister Lisa Steele is a video artist living in Canada.[6]

James B. Steele
BornJanuary 3, 1943 (age 76)
Hutchinson, Kansas
OccupationInvestigative journalist, non-fiction writer
Notable credit(s)
The Philadelphia Inquirer, Time (magazine), Vanity Fair (magazine), books:Empire: The Life, Legend, and Madness of Howard Hughes (with Donald L. Barlett), Forevermore: Nuclear Waste in America (with Donald L. Barlett), America: What Went Wrong?(with Donald L. Barlett), America: Who Really Pays the Taxes? (with Donald L. Barlett), America: Who Stole the Dream (with Donald L. Barlett), The Great American Tax Dodge (with Donald L. Barlett), Critical Condition (with Donald L. Barlett).
Spouse(s)Nancy Steele
Websitehttp://barlettandsteele.com/index.php

Books

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1979). Empire: The Life, Legend, and Madness of Howard Hughes. W.W. Norton & Company. ISBN 0-393-00025-7.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1985). Forevermore: Nuclear Waste in America. W.W. Norton & Company. ISBN 0-393-01920-9.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1992). America: What Went Wrong?. Andrews and McMeel. ISBN 0-8362-7001-0.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1994). America: Who Really Pays the Taxes?. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-87157-9.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996). America: Who Stole the Dream?. Andrews and McMeel. ISBN 0-8362-1314-9.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000). The Great American Tax Dodge: How Spiraling Fraud and Avoidance are Killing Fairness, Destroying the Income Tax, And Costing You. Little, Brown and Company. ISBN 0-316-81135-1.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004). Critical Condition: How Health Care in America Became Big Business — and Bad Medicine. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-50454-3.

Newspaper articles

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-10). "How the Influential win Billions in Special Tax Breaks". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-10). "The Tax Chairmen Fail to Respond to Queries". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A14.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-10). "A Rich Texas Widow Could Save $4 Million". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A15.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-11). "A Millionaire Businessman and his Island Tax Shelter". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-11). "A Tax Favor for Backer of Conservative Causes". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A07.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-12). "How Businesses Influence the Tax-Writing Process". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-13). "Disguising Those who get Tax Breaks". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-13). "Investors take over a Vital Atomic Plant a Tax-Saving Strategy Develops". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A10.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-14). "Congress can't add, so the Taxpayer pays". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-14). "The Wall Street star who Started Catalyst Energy". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A18.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-14). "A $4 Billion Price Tag to Stop a Nuclear Plant". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A19.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-15). "One Firm's Huge Break". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-16). "Crusing, at Taxpayers' Expense". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-04-16). "A Big Bailouts for Steel Firms with the Assistance of Heinz". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A07.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-25). "The Tax-Break Sweepstakes". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-25). "The Tax War Between the Chickens and the Pigs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A17.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-26). "Family Football Seeks Bonus Through Tax Bill". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1988-09-26). "A Historic Hotel and its Quest for a Tax Cut". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1990-11-04). "A Tax Increase for the Rich that's no Increase at all". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

"America: What Went Wrong?"

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-20). "How the Game was Rigged Against the Middle Class". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-20). "Who -- and how many -- in America's Middle Class". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A16.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-20). "After 3 Decades, American Worker Loses out to Mexico". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A17.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-21). "The Lucrative Business of Bankruptcy". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-22). "Big Business Hits that Jackpot with Billions in Tax Breaks". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-23). "Why the World is Closing in on U.S. Economy". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-24). "The High Cost of Deregulation". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-25). "For Millions in U.S., a Harsh Reality". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-25). "How Death came to a Once-Prosperous Discount-Store Chain". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A21.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-26). "Raiders work their Wizardry on an All-American Company". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-27). "When you Retire, Will There be a Pension Waiting?". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-27). "Workers Saving for Their Retirement Lose on Junk Bonds". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A17.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1991-10-28). "How Special Interest Groups have their way with Washington". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1992-02-02). "The Politics of Tax Breaks in an Election Year". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

"America: Who Stole the Dream?"

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-08). "How U.S. Policies are Costing America Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-08). "Why the Series Came to be". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A18.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-09). "Importing Goods, Exporting Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-10). "Endangered Label: Made in the USA". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-11). "The "New" American Worker". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-12). "The Burden of the Working Woman". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-15). "Shortcut to U.S. Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-16). "Say Goodbye to High-Tech Jobs". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-17). "The Lobbying Game: Influence-Brokers in D.C.". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-18). "One American Industry that Thrives: Retraining". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1996-09-22). "A Nation in Search of Answers". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. A01.

Magazine articles

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-09). "States at War". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-09). "Corporate Welfare". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-16). "Fantasy Islands". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-23). "Sweet Deal". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-23). "Paying a Price for Polluters". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-30). "The Empire of the Pigs". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (1998-11-30). "Five Ways Out". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-02-07). "How the Little Guy Gets Crunched". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-02-07). "How to Become a Top Banana". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-05-15). "Soaked By Congress". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2000-09-25). "Throwing the Game". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2002-12-16). "Who Gets the Money?". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2002-12-16). "Wheel of Misfortune". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2002-12-23). "Playing the Political Slots". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-02-03). "The Really Unfair Tax". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-05-19). "The Oily Americans". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-05-19). "Iraq's Crude Awakening". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-07-21). "The U.S. is Running Out of Energy". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-10-13). "The Great Energy Scam". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2003-10-13). "Asleep at the Switch". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004-02-02). "Why We Pay So Much for Drugs". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004-02-02). "Has Your Life Become Too Much a Game of Chance?". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2004-09-20). "Who Left the Door Open?". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2005-10-23). "The Broken Promise". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (2005-10-31). "Where Pensions are Golden". Time.

Barlett, Donald L.; Steele, James B. (March 2007). "Washington's $8 Billion Shadow". Vanity Fair.

References

  1. ^ a b "Historical Winners List". UCLA Anderson School of Management. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  2. ^ "Royster wins Loeb Award for financial journalism". The New York Times. September 25, 1975. p. 64. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  3. ^ Smith, Rosslyn (16 August 2010). "Two Cheers for Old-Fashioned Political Scoundrels". American Thinker. Retrieved 6 September 2010.
  4. ^ "Donald Barlett and James Steele: Career Timeline". Investigating Power. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  5. ^ Folkenflik, David (2017-01-30). "CNN Beefs Up Investigative Reporting". NPR.org. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  6. ^ "Lisa's long haul". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2017-03-18.

External links

1975 Pulitzer Prize

The Pulitzer Prizes for 1975, the 59th annual prizes, were ratified by the Pulitzer Prize advisory board on April 11, 1975, and by the trustees of Columbia University on May 5. For the first time, the role of accepting or rejecting recommendations of the advisory board was delegated by the trustees to the university's president, William J. McGill; the change was prompted by the desire of the trustees to distance themselves from the appearance of approval of controversial awards based on work involving what some considered to be illegal leaks, such as the 1972 Pulitzer Prize awarded for the publication of the Pentagon Papers.It was also the first year that the prize for editorial cartooning went to a comic strip artist (Garry Trudeau, writer/artist of Doonesbury), and the first year that a film critic won a Pulitzer (Roger Ebert). Dumas Malone, 83, become the prize's oldest recipient.

1989 Pulitzer Prize

Winners of the 1989 Pulitzer Prize by Category

Atlas Corporation

The Atlas Corporation is a corporation formed in 1928, in a merger of the United Corporation, an investment firm started in 1923 with $40,000, with Atlas Utilities and Investors Ltd. The corporation specialized in capital formation and management. In 1929, Atlas was a $12,550,000 investment trust. The company was able to shrewdly weather the stock market crash and continue to grow through the 1930s and 1940s. The corporation was founded by Floyd Odlum and his brother-in-law Boyd Hatch.

With Floyd Odlum as president and Boyd Hatch as vice-president, Atlas invested, managed or controlled numerous industries, including Greyhound Lines, the Bonwit Teller (acquired 1934) and Franklin Simon & Co. (acquired 1936) ladies’ apparel stores, Madison Square Garden, and various mines, utility companies, aviation related businesses, and banks. After Atlas Corporation acquired the Bonwit Teller ladies’ apparel stores, Floyd Odlum convinced his wife, Hortense Odlum, to become involved in the store’s operations. She became the first female president of a major department store chain when she became president of Bonwit Teller in 1934. In 1948, Howard Hughes acquired controlling interest in RKO Pictures from Atlas. The Atlas Missile program was named after the Atlas Corporation, the contractor through its Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation, (later Convair) subsidiary, which was used in the Mercury missions to send astronauts into orbit.

Today, the company has ownership in natural resources investments.

Donald L. Barlett

Donald L. Barlett (born July 17, 1936) is an American investigative journalist and author who often collaborates with James B. Steele. According to The Washington Journalism Review, they were a better investigative reporting team than even Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Together they have won two Pulitzer Prizes, two National Magazine Awards and six George Polk Awards. In addition, they have been recognized by their peers with awards from Investigative Reporters and Editors on five separate occasions. They are known for their reporting technique of delving deep into documents and then, after what could be a long investigative period, interviewing the necessary sources. The duo has been working together for over 40 years and is frequently referred to as Barlett and Steele.

Greta Nissen

Greta Nissen (30 January 1906 – 15 May 1988) was a Norwegian-born American film and stage actress.

Henry Cianfrani

Henry J. "Buddy" Cianfrani (March 19, 1923 – July 3, 2002) was the Pennsylvania state senator for the first district.

Prior to holding elective office, he served in the U.S. Army during World War II where he earned the Purple Heart and the Silver Star.

He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1956 and 1960. He was elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1963, where he served until his election to the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1966. He eventually attained the chairmanship of the powerful Appropriations Committee from which position he worked closely with Speaker of the House Herbert Fineman to appropriate money to Philadelphia.In 1977, Cianfrani was convicted on federal charges of racketeering and mail fraud for padding his Senate payroll. His case was prosecuted in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania by U.S. Attorney David W. Marston, who was later removed from the position by U.S. President Jimmy Carter. Cianfrani was sentenced to five years in federal prison. After serving for twenty-seven months, he was released in 1980.In the middle 1970s, he began dating political reporter Laura Foreman of The Philadelphia Inquirer. The two moved in together and she reportedly accepted money and gifts from him while she was still reporting on him for her newspaper. After the affair became public in 1977 she was fired by her employer, The New York Times. She and Cianfrani married in 1980 after his divorce from his first wife was finalized and he was released from federal prison.

Years after his release, his political career enjoyed a resurgence. In 1988 Cianfrani won back his old position as Philadelphia ward leader and regained a measure of clout within Philadelphia politics. He was considered a mentor to many Philadelphia politicians, including Congressman Bob Brady and Senator Vince Fumo.

Cianfrani died of a stroke in Hahnemann University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on July 3, 2002.

Howard Hughes

Howard Robard Hughes Jr. (December 24, 1905 – April 5, 1976) was an American business magnate, investor, record-setting pilot, engineer, film director, and philanthropist, known during his lifetime as one of the most financially successful individuals in the world. He first became prominent as a film producer, and then as an influential figure in the aviation industry. Later in life, he became known for his eccentric behavior and reclusive lifestyle—oddities that were caused in part by a worsening obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), chronic pain from a near-fatal plane crash, and increasing deafness.

As a maverick film tycoon, Hughes gained fame in Hollywood beginning in the late 1920s, when he produced big-budget and often controversial films such as The Racket (1928), Hell's Angels (1930), and Scarface (1932). Later he controlled the RKO film studio.

Hughes formed the Hughes Aircraft Company in 1932, hiring numerous engineers and designers. He spent the rest of the 1930s and much of the 1940s setting multiple world air speed records and building the Hughes H-1 Racer and H-4 Hercules (the Spruce Goose). He acquired and expanded Trans World Airlines and later acquired Air West, renaming it Hughes Airwest. Hughes was included in Flying Magazine's list of the 51 Heroes of Aviation, ranked at No. 25. Today, his legacy is maintained through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Howard Hughes Corporation.

Investigative Reporters and Editors

Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc. (IRE) is a nonprofit organization that focuses on the quality of investigative reporting. Formed in 1975, it presents the IRE Awards and holds conferences and training classes for journalists. Its headquarters is in Columbia, Missouri, at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. The IRE Awards have categories in all different media.

Investigative journalism

Investigative journalism is a form of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a single topic of interest, such as serious crimes, political corruption, or corporate wrongdoing. An investigative journalist may spend months or years researching and preparing a report. Practitioners sometimes use the terms "watchdog reporting" or "accountability reporting".

Most investigative journalism has traditionally been conducted by newspapers, wire services, and freelance journalists. With the decline in income through advertising, many traditional news services have struggled to fund investigative journalism, which is time-consuming and therefore expensive. Journalistic investigations are increasingly carried out by news organisations working together, even internationally (as in the case of the Panama Papers and Paradise Papers), or by organisations such as ProPublica, which have not operated previously as news publishers and which rely on the support of the public and benefactors to fund their work.

The growth of media conglomerates in the U.S. since the 1980s has been accompanied by massive cuts in the budgets for investigative journalism. A 2002 study concluded "that investigative journalism has all but disappeared from the nation's commercial airwaves". The empirical evidence for this is consistent with the conflicts of interest between the revenue sources for the media conglomerates and the mythology of an unbiased, dispassionate media: advertisers have reduced their spending with media that reported too many unfavorable details. The major media conglomerates have found ways to retain their audience without the risks of offending advertisers inherent in investigative journalism.

James Steele

James Steele may refer to:

James Steele (British Army officer) (1894–1975), British general

James Steele (US Colonel), US special forces veteran

James B. Steele (born 1943), American investigative journalist and author

James Harlan Steele (1913–2013), American veterinarian

Jim Steele (footballer) (born 1950), Scottish footballer who also played for Southampton

Jim Steele (wrestler) (born 1967), American professional wrestler

Jimmy Steele (American football) (1909–1980), University of Florida football player

Jimmy Steele (dentist) (1962–2017), British dentist

Jimmy Steele (republican) (1907–1970), Irish republican and Irish Republican Army (IRA) member

List of George Polk Award winners

The George Polk Awards in Journalism are a series of American journalism awards presented annually by Long Island University in New York.

Maryland Horse Industry Board

The Maryland Horse Industry Board (MHIB) is an agency which is part of the Maryland Department of Agriculture in the United States. The MHIB, originally the State Board of Inspection of Horse Riding Stables, was established by Maryland statute in 1968. It was made part of the Department of Licensing and Regulation in 1970. The Board transferred to the Department of Agriculture in 1980. In October 1998 the duties and name of the MHIB were altered. The change resulted from a statutory change lobbied for by the Maryland Horse Council, a member organization of the American Horse Council. The duties of the MHIB expanded beyond stable licensing to include:

- promoting the use and development of horses in Maryland;

- support research related to equine health and related issues;

- creating public awareness of the value of equine activities as they relate to the green space preservation;

- developing and disseminating information concerning the equine industry; and

- advising the Department of Agriculture regarding matters affecting the horse industry in the State.

There are 12 members of the MHIB, including the Secretary of the Maryland Department of Agriculture, appointed by the Governor. Those members serve four year terms and represent specific sectors or organizations of the horse industry. Those sectors or organizations include:

- Trade and Support Businesses;

- Officers of County Humane Societies;

- Trails and Recreational Riding;

- Organized Competitions and Shows;

- Thoroughbreds;

- Standardbreds;

- Academic Equine Community;

- Licensed Veterinarians;

- Maryland Horse Council;

- Licensed Stable Operators; and

- The General Public.

The Chairman of the MHIB is elected annually by the Board. Since 1998 the chairmen of the MHIB have included:

- Gregory Gingery (1998-2004)

- James B. Steele (2004–present)

The MHIB employs a staff at its discretion. The Executive Director position is currently staffed by Ross Peddicord; it was previously staffed from 2003 - 2010 by J. Robert "Rob" Burk, the Stable Inspectors are Pegeen Morgan and Keziah "Kezie" Richard and the part-time Administrative Assistant is Tonya Jones.

The MHIB has overseen several high-profile projects for the horse industry in Maryland including the Maryland Equine Census, the Maryland Horse Park project, the Mid-Atlantic International Import and Export Equine Center, and the Maryland Horse Forum. Additionally, in order to fulfill its entire mission since 1999 the MHIB has awarded grants to non-profit and not-for-profit projects benefiting the Maryland horse industry. In 2003, it awarded a $5,000 grant to the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, part of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine.

Orwell Award

The NCTE George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language (the Orwell Award for short), "established in 1975 and given by the National Council of Teachers of English Public Language Award Committee, recognizes writers who have made outstanding contributions to the critical analysis of public discourse."Its negative counterpart, awarded by the same body, is the Doublespeak Award, "an ironic tribute to public speakers who have perpetuated language that is grossly deceptive, evasive, euphemistic, confusing, or self-centered."

Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting

This Pulitzer Prize has been awarded since 1942 for a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs in the United States. In its first six years (1942–1947), it was called the Pulitzer Prize for Telegraphic Reporting – National.

Simplicity Pattern

The Simplicity Pattern Company is a manufacturer of sewing pattern guides, under the "Simplicity Pattern", "It's So Easy" and "New Look" brands. The company was founded in 1927 in New York City. During the Great Depression, Simplicity allowed home seamstresses to create fashionable clothing in a reliable manner. The patterns are manufactured in the US but are distributed and sold in Canada, England, and Australia, in some markets by Burda and in Mexico and South Africa by third-party distributors. The company licenses its name to the manufacture of non-textile materials such as sewing machines, doll house kits, and sewing supplies. Simplicity is now owned by CSS Industries.

The Hillman Prize

The Hillman Prize is a journalism award given out annually by The Sidney Hillman Foundation, named for noted American labor leader Sidney Hillman. It is given to "journalists, writers and public figures who pursue social justice and public policy for the common good."Murray Kempton was the first recipient, in 1950. Organizations have also received the award. Each winner receives $5,000.

The Philadelphia Inquirer

The Philadelphia Inquirer is a morning daily newspaper that serves the Philadelphia metropolitan area of the United States. The newspaper was founded by John R. Walker and John Norvell in June 1829 as The Pennsylvania Inquirer and is the third-oldest surviving daily newspaper in the United States. Owned by Philadelphia Media Network, a subsidiary of The Philadelphia Foundation's nonprofit Institute for Journalism in New Media, The Inquirer has the eighteenth largest average weekday U.S. newspaper circulation and has won twenty Pulitzer Prizes. It is the newspaper of record in the Delaware Valley.The paper has risen and fallen in prominence throughout its history. The Inquirer first became a major newspaper during the American Civil War when its war coverage was popular on both sides. The paper's circulation dropped after the war, then rose by the end of the 19th century. Originally supportive of the Democratic Party, The Inquirer's political affiliation eventually shifted toward the Whig Party and then the Republican Party before officially becoming politically independent in the middle of the 20th century. By the end of the 1960s, The Inquirer trailed its chief competitor, the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, and lacked modern facilities and experienced staff. In the 1970s, new owners and editors turned the newspaper into one of the country's most prominent, winning 20 Pulitzers.

The editor is Gabriel Escobar. Stan Wischnowski is vice president of news operations.

Time (magazine)

Time is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition (Time Europe, formerly known as Time Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa, and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition (Time Asia) is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney. In December 2008, Time discontinued publishing a Canadian advertiser edition.Time has the world's largest circulation for a weekly news magazine. The print edition has a readership of 26 million, 20 million of whom are based in the United States. In mid-2012, its circulation was over three million, which had lowered to two million by late 2017.Richard Stengel was the managing editor from May 2006 to October 2013, when he joined the U.S. State Department. Nancy Gibbs was the managing editor from September 2013 until September 2017. She was succeeded by Edward Felsenthal, who had been Time's digital editor.

William E. Simon

William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927 – June 3, 2000) was an American businessman, a Secretary of Treasury of the U.S. for three years, and a philanthropist. He became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 9, 1974, during the Nixon administration. After Nixon resigned, Simon was reappointed by President Ford and served until 1977 when President Carter took office. Outside of government, he was a successful businessman and philanthropist. The William E. Simon Foundation carries on this legacy. He styled himself as a strong advocate of laissez-faire capitalism. He wrote, "There is only one social system that reflects the sovereignty of the individual: the free-market, or capitalist, system".

(1974–1979)
(1980–1989)
(1990–1999)
(2000–2009)
(2010–2014)
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
Recipients of the Orwell Award
1975–1999
2000–present

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