Jamal Reynolds

Idris Jamal Reynolds (born February 20, 1979) is an American former college and professional football player who was a defensive end in the National Football League (NFL) for three seasons during the early 2000s. He played college football for Florida State University, and was recognized as a consensus All-American. The Green Bay Packers chose him in the first round of the 2001 NFL Draft.

Jamal Reynolds
No. 99
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:February 20, 1979 (age 40)
Augusta, Georgia
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:260 lb (118 kg)
Career information
High school:Aiken (SC)
College:Florida State
NFL Draft:2001 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:18
Tackles:16
Quarterback sacks:3.0
Fumbles recovered:2
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Reynolds was born in Augusta, Georgia. He attended Aiken High School in Aiken, South Carolina. His brother, Rashad Reynolds, helped Aiken High School win a high school football state championship in 1992.

College career

Reynolds attended Florida State University, and played defensive end for coach Bobby Bowden's Florida State Seminoles football team from 1997 to 2000. Following his 2000 senior season, he earned first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) honors, and was recognized as a unanimous first-team All-American.[1] He also won the Rotary Lombardi Award, and was a finalist for College Football News' Defensive Player of the Year award. As a senior, Reynolds accumulated a career high 12 sacks and 58 tackles.

Professional

His strong college pedigree led the Green Bay Packers to select him with the 10th overall selection in the 2001 NFL Draft. The Packers acquired the draft pick from the Seattle Seahawks, in exchange for Matt Hasselbeck and the 17th overall selection in the draft.

Injuries and the emergence of Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila, however, prevented Reynolds from playing the first ten games of his rookie season. He finished his rookie season with four tackles and two sacks. On July 8, 2004, after two seasons in which Reynolds totaled only three sacks and played in only 13 games, the Packers attempted to trade Reynolds to the Indianapolis Colts. However, the trade was declared void after Reynolds failed the Colts' physical examination. Ten days later, the Packers released Reynolds, and he was picked up by the Cleveland Browns, who hoped to salvage the still-young Reynolds' career. Reynolds was cut by the Browns before the beginning of the 2004 season, and has not played in the NFL since.

References

  1. ^ 2011 NCAA Football Records Book, Award Winners, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, p. 11 (2011). Retrieved June 24, 2012.

External links

1999 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 1999 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University during the college football season of 1999. Winning the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Championship and winning the 2000 Sugar Bowl BCS National Championship game, the team was coached by Bobby Bowden and played their home games at Doak Campbell Stadium. The team entered the season with high expectations after losing to Tennessee in the inaugural BCS Championship game. FSU entered the 1999 pre-season ranked No. 1 in all national pre-season polls, picked unanimously to win the ACC and expected to contend for a national championship. The Seminoles finished 11-2 in 1998, extending their NCAA record to 13 straight seasons with at least 10 victories and ranked among the nation's top four teams.The Seminoles finished the 1999 season with a perfect 12-0 record and was the first in NCAA history to go "wire-to-wire" being ranked continuously as the nation's No. 1 team from the preseason through the bowl season. This marked the 13th consecutive season that the Seminoles will have finished in the Top 5 rankings of both the AP and coaches poll. The 2000 Sugar Bowl BCS National Championship game also marks the 17th consecutive season the Bowden lead Seminoles played in a bowl game.

2000 College Football All-America Team

The 2000 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press, Football Writers Association of America, American Football Coaches Association, Walter Camp Foundation, The Sporting News, Pro Football Weekly, Football News, Sports Illustrated and Rivals.com.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

2000 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 2000 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University in the 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Bobby Bowden and played their home games at Doak Campbell Stadium. The Seminoles reached the title game for the third straight year and quarterback Chris Weinke won the school's second Heisman Trophy.

2000 NCAA Division I-A football season

The 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the Oklahoma Sooners claiming their first national championship and their first conference championship since the departure of head coach Barry Switzer.

Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops was in his second season as head coach, having been the defensive coordinator of Steve Spurrier's 1996 National Champion Florida Gators, and also having helped Bill Snyder turn the Kansas State Wildcats around in the early 1990s. Stoops erased a three-game losing streak against rival Texas by a score of 63–14, one of the worst defeats in Texas' football history. Despite the lopsided victory, this game marked a return of the Red River Shootout to a rivalry game with national title implications.

The BCS title game was not without controversy, as the system shut fourth-ranked Washington out of the championship game, despite being the only team who had beaten each #2 Miami and #5 Oregon State and having the same 10-1 record as #3 Florida State during the regular season. 10–1 Miami, who handed #3 Florida State their only loss, was ranked higher in both the AP Writers' Poll and the ESPN/USA Today Coaches' Poll, and had the same record as the Seminoles, was also seen as a possible title contender.

Virginia Tech also was left out of the BCS bowls, despite being ranked higher than one of the at-large teams, Notre Dame.

The South Carolina Gamecocks broke a 21-game losing streak, stretching back into 1998, to go 8–4 including a win over Ohio State in the Outback Bowl.

Two new bowl games began in the 2000 season: the Silicon Valley Bowl, which had a contractual tie-in with the WAC, and the Galleryfurniture.com Bowl.

2001 Green Bay Packers season

The 2001 Green Bay Packers season was their 83rd season overall and their 81st season in the National Football League.

The Packers returned to the postseason after two years of missing the playoffs if the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

They finished with a 12–4 record. After easily defeating the San Francisco 49ers in the wild card round, Green Bay's season ended with a loss to the 14–2 St. Louis Rams in the NFC divisional playoff game, in which quarterback Brett Favre threw a career high six interceptions.

2002 Green Bay Packers season

The 2002 Green Bay Packers season was their 84th season overall and their 82nd in the National Football League.

The Packers achieved a 12–4 record in the regular season, before losing in the 2003 NFL Wild Card playoffs round to Michael Vick's Atlanta Falcons at Lambeau Field. This marked the first time in NFL history that the Packers had lost at home in the playoffs.

2004 Green Bay Packers season

The 2004 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 86th season overall and their 84th in the National Football League.

The season started with the Packers on a losing streak of four of their first five games, then winning their next six games, and finally ending in a Wild Card playoff loss to the Minnesota Vikings. They finished with an overall record of 10–6. This was the second time the Packers had lost a playoff game at Lambeau.

2018–19 NBL Canada season

The 2018–19 NBL Canada season is the eighth season of the National Basketball League of Canada. The regular season started on November 15, 2018, and will run to March 31, 2019.

Aiken High School (Aiken, South Carolina)

Aiken High School is a four-year public high school located in Aiken, South Carolina, United States. Approximately 1,700 students attend the school.

Alonzo Jackson

Alonzo Jackson (born September 15, 1980) is a former American football defensive end. He previously played for the Pittsburgh Steelers, New York Giants, and the Philadelphia Eagles.

Brian Allen (linebacker)

Brian Lamar Allen (born April 1, 1978) is a former American football linebacker who played four seasons in the National Football League. Allen played college football at Florida State University.

Clay Ingram

Clay Ingram (born February 5, 1978) is a Republican politician from Florida. He served in the Florida House of Representatives from 2010 to 2018, representing parts of Escambia County.

Florida State Seminoles football

The Florida State Seminoles football team represents Florida State University (variously Florida State or FSU) in the sport of American football. The Seminoles compete in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The team is known for its storied history, distinctive helmet, fight song and colors as well as the many traditions associated with the school.

Florida State has won three national championships, eighteen conference titles and six division titles along with a playoff appearance. The Seminoles have achieved three undefeated seasons, finished ranked in the top four of the AP Poll for 14 straight years from 1987 through 2000 and completed 41 straight winning seasons from 1977 through 2017. The 1999 team received votes from ESPN as one of the top teams in college football history.The team has produced three Heisman Trophy winners: quarterbacks Charlie Ward in 1993, Chris Weinke in 2000 and Jameis Winston in 2013. The Biletnikoff Award, presented annually to the top receiver in college football, is named for Florida State hall of famer Fred Biletnikoff. Other awards won by Florida State players include the Walter Camp Award, the Maxwell Award, the Davey O'Brien Award, the Lombardi Award, the Dick Butkus Award, the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, the Lou Groza Award, the Dave Rimington Trophy and the Bobby Bowden Award. Florida State coaches have been honored with the Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award, the Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award, the Home Depot Coach of the Year Award, the Broyles Award, and the Paul "Bear" Bryant Award. Many former Seminoles have gone on to have successful careers in the NFL.

The program has produced 219 All-Americans (45 consensus and 15 unanimous) and 250 professional players. Florida State has had six members inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, two members inducted into the College Football Coaches Hall of Fame and four members inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The Seminoles have the tenth-highest winning percentage among all college football programs in Division I FBS history with over 500 victories. Florida State has appeared in forty-eight postseason bowl games and rank ninth nationally for bowl winning percentage and fourth for bowl wins. The Seminoles' archrivals are Florida, whom they meet annually in the last game of the regular season, and Miami; both games are considered among the greatest rivalries in college football. A rivalry with Clemson has developed and grown due to both teams competing yearly for the ACC Atlantic division.

The team is coached by Willie Taggart and plays its home games at Bobby Bowden Field at Doak Campbell Stadium, currently the 18th largest stadium in college football and the 2nd largest in the ACC, located on-campus in Tallahassee, Florida.

Florida State Seminoles football statistical leaders

The Florida State Seminoles football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Florida State Seminoles football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Seminoles represent Florida State University in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Florida State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1947. This relatively recent start date means that, unlike many other teams, the Seminoles do not divide statistics into a "modern" era and a "pre-modern" era in which complete statistics are unavailable. Thus, all of the lists below potentially include players from as far back as 1947.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1947, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Seminoles have played in a bowl game every year since the decision, giving players an extra game to accumulate statistics each year since 2002.

Similarly, the Seminoles have played in the ACC Championship Game five times since it first occurred in 2005, giving players in those seasons an additional game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2017 season.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Seattle Seahawks first-round draft picks

The Seattle Seahawks joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1976 with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. They participated in their first draft, the 1976 NFL draft and selected Steve Niehaus, a defensive tackle from Notre Dame. The team's most recent first round selection was in 2018 when they chose Rashaad Penny, a running back from San Diego State.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.The Seahawks have never selected the number one overall pick in any draft, although they have selected the second overall pick twice, the third overall pick three times and the fourth overall pick twice. The team's three selections from Notre Dame are the most chosen by the Seahawks from one university. The team's most recent first-round selections was running back Rashaad Penny.

Lombardi Award

The Lombardi Award is awarded by the Lombardi Foundation annually to the best college football player, regardless of position, based on performance, as well as leadership, character, and resiliency. From 1970 until 2016 the award was presented by Rotary International specifically to a lineman or linebacker. The Lombardi Award program was approved by the Rotary International club in Houston in 1970 shortly after the death of famed National Football League coach Vince Lombardi. The committee outlined the criteria for eligibility for the award, which remained in place until 2016: A player should be a down lineman on either offense or defense or a linebacker who lines up no further than five yards deep from the ball.The voting electorate is made up of the head coaches from all NCAA Division I schools, sports media personnel from across the country, and former winners and finalists of the Lombardi Award. The total number of voters is approximately 500. Ohio State University holds the record for most Lombardi awards with six. Orlando Pace, the only two-time winner (1995 and 1996), is the most recent offensive lineman to be honored.

The main part of the trophy used to be a block of granite, paying homage to Lombardi's college days at Fordham University as an offensive lineman when his offensive line was referred to as the "Seven Blocks of Granite". A new trophy designed by Texas sculptor Edd Hayes replaced the original block of granite.

Rufus Brown

Rufus Brown (born July 18, 1980 in San Antonio, Texas) is a professional American football wide receiver/defensive back for the Arizona Rattlers in the Arena Football League.

Brown graduated from Austin High School in El Paso, Texas. He attended Florida State University, where he played football all four years. After playing on the championship team in 1999, he was a starter for the latter two of those years, graduating in 2002 with a degree in Information management. He signed with the Washington Redskins as an undrafted free agent in 2004. After playing on the team's scout team for most of the season, he made his National Football League debut early in 2005. After that season, he was allocated to the Hamburg Sea Devils, for whom he posted fifteen tackles. In 2005, he signed with the San Jose SaberCats, where he spent the 2005 and 2006 seasons on injured reserve.

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