Jamaal Charles

Jamaal RaShaad Jones Charles (born December 27, 1986) is an American football running back who is currently a free agent. He played college football for the University of Texas, and was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the third round of the 2008 NFL Draft.

Charles's first year as a Chief was hardly in the spotlight; as a backup to halfback Larry Johnson, Charles rushed only 67 times for 357 yards. His breakout season came the following year in 2009. In his second year, Charles rushed 190 times for 1,120 yards, despite only starting 10 games after Larry Johnson was suspended. Shortly thereafter, Johnson was released, leaving Charles as Kansas City's starting halfback.

In 2013 Charles broke the NFL's all-time record in career yards-per-carry among running backs, with an average of 5.82.[1]

Jamaal Charles
refer to caption
Charles with the Broncos in 2017
Free agent
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:December 27, 1986 (age 32)
Port Arthur, Texas
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:199 lb (90 kg)
Career information
High school:Memorial (Port Arthur, Texas)
College:Texas
NFL Draft:2008 / Round: 3 / Pick: 73
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 7, 2018
Rushing yards:7,563
Yards per carry:5.4
Rushing touchdowns:44
Receptions:310
Receiving yards:2,593
Receiving touchdowns:20
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Charles has reported being diagnosed with a learning disability as a child, having difficulty reading, and being mocked and teased. In 2015, he shared his experience including being invited to participate in the Special Olympics: "[...] I was afraid. I was lost. When I was a boy, I had trouble reading. I found out I had a learning disability. People made fun of me. They said I would never go anywhere. But I learned I can fly. When I was 10 years old, I had a chance to compete in the Special Olympics. That's right, the Special Olympics gave me my first chance to discover the talent I did not know that I had. When I competed in the Special Olympics, I found out just how fast I was. I stood high on the podium, getting the gold medal in track and field."[2][3]

Charles attended and played high school football for Memorial High School of Port Arthur, Texas.[4] As a junior, he ran for 2,051 yards and 25 touchdowns while leading Memorial to the 5A Division II quarterfinals.[5] He was named first team all-state by the Texas Sports Writers Association and second team all-state by the Associated Press.[6]

Charles followed up his stellar junior season by rushing for 2,056 yards and 25 touchdowns during his senior year with the Titans.[7] The Associated Press named him to their first team all-state squad and he was declared the Houston Chronicle area offensive MVP. Charles was also named to the 2005 Parade All-America Football Team[8] and was the District 22-5A Player of the Year both his junior and senior year. Charles participated in the 2005 U.S. Army All-American Bowl.[9]

Charles is a two-time recipient of the Willie Ray Smith Award, which is given to the southeast Texas offensive MVP.[10]

College career

Track

Charles was a standout track athlete at Port Arthur (TX) Memorial. In the summer between his sophomore and junior years, Charles won the bronze medal in the 400m hurdles at the 2003 World Youth Championships in Athletics.[11] He went on to win the 110m hurdles and 300m hurdles Texas 5A state championships with times of 13.69 and 36.03 seconds, respectively, his senior year.

On March 11, 2006, Charles placed fourth in the NCAA 60-meter indoor track and field championship finals. On May 14, 2006, Charles captured his first conference title and the third Big 12 100-meter title for Texas by winning the event in 10.23 at the Big 12 outdoor meet. He led the 200 meter race after the preliminary round but elected not to participate in the final, as Texas had the Big 12 team title well in hand. On June 10, at the NCAA outdoor competition, Charles took fifth place in the 100 meter finals, edging out UTEP's stand-out sprinter Churandy Martina (sixth place), who earlier in the year ran a 9.76 (wind-aided) 100-meters. Charles also placed seventh in the 200 meter finals, and ran the third leg of the 4 × 100 Texas Longhorn relay team, earning a fifth place in the finals. Charles's efforts helped the Longhorns earn a third place showing for the men's track and field team, the highest since a second-place finish at the 1997 NCAA finals. Thus, Charles completed his first collegiate track season as a four-time All-American (60m indoor, 100m outdoor, 200m outdoor, 4 × 100 m relay outdoor).

Personal bests

Event Time (seconds) Venue Date
60 meters 6.65[12] Fayetteville, Arkansas March 10, 2006
100 meters 10.13[13] Austin, Texas May 27, 2006
200 meters 20.62 Austin, Texas April 22, 2006

Football

College football - Texas Longhorns vs Rice Owls - tailback Jamaal Charles rushing - 2006-09-16
Tailback Jamaal Charles of the 2006 Texas Longhorns football team rushes for a first down vs the Rice University Owls September 16, 2006.

Charles attended and played college football for the University of Texas from 2005–2007 under head coach Mack Brown.[14][15]

2005 season

In his true freshman season with the Longhorns, Charles was an instant contributor. In his collegiate debut against Louisiana-Lafayette, he had 135 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 60–3 victory.[16] Two weeks later, against Rice, he had 189 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns in the 51–10 victory.[17] On October 8, in the Red River Showdown against Oklahoma, he had 116 rushing yards and a touchdown in the 45–12 victory.[18] Overall, he rushed 119 times for 878 yards and 11 touchdowns, averaging 7.4 yards per carry, and assisting his team in winning a national championship in the Rose Bowl over Southern California.[19][20][21]

2006 season

After a disappointing performance in his sophomore campaign, where Charles did not reach the 1,000 yards rushing mark, Charles opted not to participate in track so he could focus on getting bigger for football. He went over 100 rushing yards only once, which was against Rice in a 52–7 victory.[22] He had a 72-yard reception in the 2006 Alamo Bowl 26–24 victory over Iowa.[23] Overall, he finished with 831 rushing yards, seven rushing touchdowns, 18 receptions, 183 receiving yards, and one receiving touchdown.[24]

2007 season

In the summer prior to the 2007 season, some observers believed he was the fastest college running back in the upcoming season. CBS SportsLine said, "Track star Jamaal Charles has the potential at running back to enjoy a break-out season and possesses the kind of breakaway speed that lead to an 80-yard rush and a 70-yard catch last season." [25] Athlon Sports remarked, "Over the last two years, running back Jamaal Charles has run for 1,702 yards at 6.2 yards per carry with 18 touchdowns despite starting only four games. He has the job to himself and should have a breakout year." [26]

In 2007, Charles rushed for 1,619 yards, with an average of more than six yards per carry.[27] Charles started the season with 112 rushing yards and a touchdown in a 21–13 victory over Arkansas State.[28] In the next game, a 34–13 victory over TCU, he had 134 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[29] In the next game, a 35–32 victory away victory at Central Florida, he had 153 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[30] In the next game, he had 72 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns in a 58–14 victory over Rice.[31] Despite his successes early in the season, Mack Brown and Greg Davis hinted that Charles could face less playing time as a result of his fumbling problems.[32] Charles said that he felt a deep remorse over his fumbles and felt that he is the biggest reason the team lost to the Oklahoma Sooners in the 2007 Red River Shootout. Texas running backs coach Ken Rucker and former Longhorn running back Earl Campbell both worked with Charles on his ball handling. Greg Davis said he wanted to get the ball to Charles "in space", on pitches and passes, instead of in heavy traffic up the center.[33]

On October 28, 2007, Charles rushed for 290 yards in the 28–25 victory, the most ever against the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the fourth-highest total in Texas Longhorns history.[34] His 216 yards in the fourth quarter were just six shy of the NCAA record for a single quarter set by the University of Washington Huskies's Corey Dillon in 1996. For these accomplishments, Charles won a fan vote for AT&T All-America Player of the Week.[35] He followed that up with 180 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns in a 38–35 victory over Oklahoma State.[36] On November 10, against Texas Tech, he had 174 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 59–43 victory.[37] In the 2007 Holiday Bowl against Arizona State, he had 161 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns in the 52–34 victory.[38]

Charles decided to forgo his senior season with Texas in favor of joining the NFL as a professional football player in the 2008 NFL Draft.[39] This decision came after earlier statements that he would stay with Texas. In November, Charles said he would return for his senior season rather than enter professional football in the NFL.[40] Sources reported in December 2007 that Charles and fellow Longhorn Jermichael Finley had filed paperwork with the NFL to evaluate how high they might be drafted if they decided enter professional football in the NFL Draft instead of returning for their senior season. Mack Brown did not comment about specific players but said, "We always try to help our guys get as much information as possible when it comes to the NFL. We encourage and help them go through the process... All of our underclassmen have told us they will be coming back, but if you're playing well enough to be considered an NFL prospect, going through the process can only help you better understand it and realize what you need to work on to improve your status."[41] Charles said he would not go pro unless he was predicted to be chosen in the first round of the draft.[42][43] After the 2007 Holiday Bowl, Charles said, "Right now, I’m probably coming back. I didn’t think I did that good in the game. Next year maybe I’ll be up for the Heisman. I will come back."[44] From 2000–2007 the Longhorns have had seven players taken in the Top 10 draft picks by the NFL, more than any other school.[43] On January 2 Charles announced he received and was happy with the results of his draft evaluation and that he would declare for the draft.[39]

Despite skipping his senior year, Charles ranks fourth in the list of total-rushing yards by a Texas player, behind Ricky Williams, Cedric Benson, and Earl Campbell, with 3,328 yards.[45] Williams and Campbell each won the Heisman Trophy in their senior season.

College statistics

Jamaal Charles Rushing Receiving
Year Team GP Att Yards Avg TDs Rec Yards TDs
2005 Texas 13 119 878 7.4 11 14 157 2
2006 Texas 12 156 831 5.3 7 18 183 1
2007 Texas 13 258 1,619 6.3 18 17 199 0
College Totals 38 533 3,328 6.2 36 49 539 3

Source:[46]

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad
5 ft 11 in
(1.80 m)
200 lb
(91 kg)
32 18 in
(0.82 m)
8 34 in
(0.22 m)
4.38 s 1.53 s 2.56 s 4.22 s 6.80 s 30 12 in
(0.77 m)
10 ft 2 in
(3.10 m)
All values from NFL Combine[47][48]

Kansas City Chiefs

2008 season

The Kansas City Chiefs selected Charles in the third round of the 2008 NFL Draft with the 73rd overall pick, acquired from the Minnesota Vikings in the Jared Allen trade. He was the ninth running back to be selected that year.[49] Charles thought he would go early in the second round but said he had no regrets about leaving college early.[50] Charles was expected to begin his career as the Chiefs' No. 3 back behind Larry Johnson and Kolby Smith.[51]

Jamaal Charles
Charles with the Kansas City Chiefs in 2010

In his first professional football game, Charles rushed for 28 yards on five carries against the New England Patriots. He also recorded two catches for six yards.[52] The Chiefs would go on to lose the game 17–10.[53]

In Charles's first professional season, he ended with 357 yards rushing and 272 yards receiving, but what was most impressive in his rookie season was his 5.3 yard per carry average. In Week 9 of the 2008 season with Larry Johnson out, Charles was given the bulk of the carries and managed 106 yards on 18 carries against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[54] In Week 16 of the 2008 season, Charles managed to go over 100 yards receiving with 3 catches for 102 yards against the Miami Dolphins.[55][56]

2009 season

During Week 9 of the 2009 NFL season, Larry Johnson was released and Charles was promoted to first-string but split carries with Kolby Smith.[57] In his limited action against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Charles managed 36 yards on only six carries for a 6-yard per carry average.[58] During Week 10, against the Oakland Raiders, Charles ran for 103 yards on 18 carries including a 44-yard touchdown run, the Chiefs first rushing touchdown of the year.[59] In Week 11, against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Charles returned the opening kickoff 97 yards for a touchdown. He went on to rush for 58 yards and also had had a 2-yard reception for a touchdown. The Chiefs won the game 27–24 in overtime.[60] Charles was named AFC Special Teams Player of the Week.[61] In Week 14, against the Buffalo Bills, Charles ran for a 76-yard touchdown, one of the longest runs in Chiefs history.[62] In Week 17, on the road against the Denver Broncos, Charles rushed for 259 yards on 25 carries, scoring two touchdowns and breaking the Chiefs' single-game rushing record. The Chiefs won 44–24.[63] Charles also became the only player in NFL history to rush for 1,100 or more yards in 200 or fewer carries.[64][65]

2010 season

The Chiefs opened up the 2010 season with a win over their division rival, the San Diego Chargers. In that game, Charles played a pivotal role, including a 56-yard run.[66] On October 31, against the Buffalo Bills, he had 177 rushing yards in the 13–10 victory.[67] On November 28, against the Seattle Seahawks, he had 173 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 42–24 victory.[68] In the following game, he had 116 rushing yards in the 10–6 victory over the Denver Broncos.[69] in Week 15, against the St. Louis Rams, he had 126 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[70] Charles finished the season with 1,467 yards and 5 touchdowns on only 230 carries and was voted to his first career Pro Bowl.[71][72] His 6.38 yards per carry average for the season was the second-highest average in NFL history, second only to Hall of Famer Jim Brown, only two one-hundredths of a yard off of the record pace set by the Browns legend. On December 11, 2010, the Chiefs reached an agreement with Charles on a five-year, $32.5 million deal that includes $13 million guaranteed.[73] In the 2011 Pro Bowl, Charles rushed for 72-yards on 10 carries and scored one touchdown.[74] Charles was honored for his performance in the 2010 season by being selected to his first AP All-Pro team.[75] On the NFL Network's Top 100 Players of 2011, Charles was ranked the 33rd by his fellow players and was also one of the youngest players on the list.[76]

2011 season

Charles's 2011 season was short lived. In a Week 1 loss to the Buffalo Bills, Charles rushed for 56 yards on 10 carries and had a receiving touchdown.[77] The following week, against the Detroit Lions, Charles ran for 27 yards on two carries, before suffering an ACL injury.[78] Chiefs head coach Todd Haley confirmed the next day that Charles would miss the remainder of the 2011 season.[79] Charles was officially placed on injured reserve on September 19.[80]

2012 season

Coming off of an ACL injury in 2011, Charles had an all-pro caliber season, running for 1,509 yards and five touchdowns. Once again, Charles proved to be very efficient running the ball as he managed a 5.3 yard per carry average on the year.[81] In the season opener against the Atlanta Falcons, he had 87 rushing yards on 16 carries in his first action back from injury.[82] In Week 3 against the New Orleans Saints, Charles ran 33 times for 233 yards, scored a touchdown, and caught 6 passes for 55 yards to earn his first AFC Offensive Player of the Week nod.[83][84] In Week 5 against Baltimore Ravens, Charles carried the ball 31 times for 140 yards in a loss.[85] However, in Week 8, Charles carried the ball only 5 times in a loss to the Oakland Raiders.[86] When asked the reason why, head coach Romeo Crennel said "Now, that I'm not exactly sure, either." [87] In a loss to the Cleveland Browns later in the season, Charles carried the ball 18 times for 165 yards and a touchdown.[88] In a loss to the Indianapolis Colts, Charles carried the ball 22 times for 226 yards and another touchdown.[89] Charles carried the ball 20+ times in 6 games, and in each of those games managed at least 100 yards. This has been a trend throughout his entire career, in every game he has carried the ball 20 times, he has gained at least 100 yards. On December 23, 2012, following his qualifying 750th career carry, Charles broke NFL legend Jim Brown's 47-year-old all-time average yards per carry record of 5.22 with an average of 5.82. He was named to his second Pro Bowl as a result of his successful season.[90] On the NFL Top 100 Players of 2013, he was ranked 20th by his peers.[91]

2013 season

Charles started the 2013 season with 77 rushing yards, one rushing touchdown, three receptions, and 23 receiving yards in the 28–2 victory over the Jacksonville Jaguars.[92] On October 6, against the Tennessee Titans, he had 108 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 26–17 victory.[93] In the next game, a 24–7 victory over the Oakland Raiders, he had 78 rushing yards and two more rushing touchdowns.[94] On November 24, against the San Diego Chargers, he had 115 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[95] On December 15, in the second divisional game against the Oakland Raiders, Charles had eight receptions for 195 yards, 20 rushing yards, and five total touchdowns in a 56–31 Chiefs victory.[96] Charles's performance made him the first Chiefs player to score five touchdowns in a game since Abner Haynes accomplished the feat for the Dallas Texans in 1961.[97] He became the first player in NFL history to have four touchdown receptions and one rushing touchdown in a single game.[98] He scored 30 total points in the game, which was tied with for the most by any player in a single game in the 2013 season, and earned AFC Offensive Player of the Week honors.[99][100] He earned First Team All-Pro honors for the second time in his career.[101] He was named to his second consecutive and third career Pro Bowl.[102] He was ranked as the eighth best player in the NFL on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2014.[103]

2014 season

On July 23, 2014, one day after threatening to hold out of training camp, Charles agreed to 2-year, $18.1 million extension making him one of the top five highest paid running backs in the NFL.[104] On September 14, 2014, Charles suffered a high ankle sprain against the Denver Broncos.[105] On September 29, against the New England Patriots, he had 92 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 41–14 victory to earn AFC Offensive Player of the Week honors.[106][107] On October 19, against the San Diego Chargers, Charles passed Priest Holmes as the all-time leading rusher for the Chiefs.[108] In the next game, he had 67 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns in the 34–7 victory over the St. Louis Rams.[109] On November 16, against the Seattle Seahawks, he had 159 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns in the 24–20 victory.[110] On December 7, against the Arizona Cardinals, he had 91 rushing yards, one rushing touchdown, two receptions, 20 receiving yards, and a receiving touchdown in the 17–14 loss.[111] Overall, he finished the 2014 season with 1,033 rushing yards, nine rushing touchdowns, 40 receptions, 291 receiving yards, and five receiving touchdowns.[112] He was named to his third consecutive Pro Bowl for the 2014 season.[113] He was ranked 12th by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2015.[114]

2015 season

In the season opener against the Houston Texans, Charles had 57 rushing yards, 46 receiving yards, and a receiving touchdown in the 27–20 victory.[115] Four days later, against the Denver Broncos, he had 125 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 31–24 loss on Thursday Night Football. In the loss, he had a key fumble late in the game that gave the Broncos the winning points.[116] In the next game, a 38–28 loss to the Green Bay Packers, he had 49 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns.[117] On October 11, Charles tore his ACL in his right knee in a Week 5 game against the Chicago Bears. He was placed on injured reserve ending his season.[118][119] Despite the injury, Charles was still ranked 75th by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2016.[120]

2016 season

Heading into the 2016 season, Charles never fully recovered from his torn ACL suffered the previous season. He returned to the field in Week 5 and played in three games recording 40 rushing yards plus a touchdown along with two receptions for 14 yards.[121] He suffered a setback with his knee prior to Week 8 and needed a second surgery on his knee to trim his meniscus. He was placed on injured reserve on November 1, 2016.[122]

On February 28, 2017, Charles was released by the Chiefs.[123]

Denver Broncos

On May 2, 2017, Charles signed a one-year, $3.75 million contract with the Denver Broncos.[124][125] In the season opener against the Los Angeles Chargers on Monday Night Football, Charles had 10 rushes for 40 yards but lost a fumble in his Broncos debut.[126] In Week 3, in a 26–16 loss to the Buffalo Bills, he scored his lone rushing touchdown of the season.[127] In 14 games, he had 296 rushing yards, one rushing touchdown, 23 receptions, and 129 receiving yards.[128]

Jacksonville Jaguars

Charles signed with the Jacksonville Jaguars on October 9, 2018.[129] He was released on October 22, 2018.[130] He played in two games with the Jaguars in the 2018 season and only totaled seven rushing yards and two receptions for seven yards.[131]

Career statistics

Season Team Games Rushing Receiving Fumbles
GP GS Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2008 KC 16 2 67 357 5.3 30 0 27 272 10.1 75 1 2 2
2009 KC 15 10 190 1,120 5.9 76T 7 40 297 7.4 49 1 4 3
2010 KC 16 6 230 1,467 6.4 80 5 45 468 10.4 31 3 3 2
2011 KC 2 1 12 83 6.9 24 0 5 9 1.8 9 1 1 1
2012 KC 16 15 285 1,509 5.3 91T 5 35 236 6.7 22 1 5 3
2013 KC 15 15 259 1,287 5.0 46 12 70 693 9.9 71 7 4 2
2014 KC 15 15 206 1,033 5.0 63T 9 40 291 7.3 30 5 5 3
2015 KC 5 5 71 364 5.1 34T 4 21 177 8.4 26 1 3 2
2016 KC 3 0 12 40 3.3 17 1 2 14 7.0 16 0 0 0
2017 DEN 14 0 69 296 4.3 19 1 23 129 5.6 20 0 2 2
2018 JAX 2 0 6 7 1.2 5 0 2 7 3.5 5 0 0 0
Total 118 69 1,407 7,563 5.4 91T 44 310 2,593 8.4 75 20 29 20

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External links

2003 World Youth Championships in Athletics

The 2003 World Youth Championships in Athletics was the third edition of the international athletics competition for youth (under-18) athletes organised by the IAAF. It was held in Sherbrooke, Canada from the 9–13 July at the Université de Sherbrooke Stadium.

2005 Texas Longhorns football team

The 2005 Texas Longhorns football team represented the University of Texas at Austin during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season, winning the Big 12 Conference championship and the national championship. The team was coached by Mack Brown, led on offense by quarterback Vince Young, and played its home games at Darrell K. Royal – Texas Memorial Stadium.

The team's penultimate victory of the season, the Big 12 Championship Game, featured the biggest margin of victory in the history of that contest. They finished the season by winning the 2006 Rose Bowl against the USC Trojans for the national championship. Numerous publications have cited this victory as standing among the greatest performances in college football history, and ESPN awarded the 2006 ESPY Award for the "Best Game" in any sport to the Longhorns and the Trojans. The Longhorns finished as the only unbeaten team in NCAA Division I-A football that year, with thirteen wins and zero losses.Texas earned its second Big 12 Conference football championship to make 27 conference championships total, including 25 in the Southwest Conference. It was their fourth national championship in football and the ninth perfect season in the history of Longhorn football.The team set numerous school and NCAA records, including their 652 points which set an NCAA record for points scored in a season. After the season ended, six Longhorns from this championship team joined professional football teams through the 2006 NFL Draft. Seven more Longhorns followed suit in the 2007 NFL Draft and they were joined by two free agents. Another nine followed through the 2008 Draft and free-agency to make a total of twenty-four players who entered into the National Football League (NFL).

2005 Texas vs. Ohio State football game

The 2005 Texas vs. Ohio State football game, played September 10, 2005, was the first-ever meeting between The University of Texas at Austin and The Ohio State University in a college football game. The two teams came into the game ranked No. 2 and No. 4, respectively. It was the second game of the 2005 season for both teams. Schools have become increasingly conservative in scheduling non-conference opponents of a high caliber, so a meeting of two top-five teams in the country was unusual this early in the season. For either team, winning the game would boost their chances of ultimately playing in the BCS National Championship Game while the loser likely faced the end of their national championship hopes.

According to observers such as USA Today, the game between the Texas Longhorns and Ohio State Buckeyes was one of the most-anticipated games of the 2005 season. Due to the high level of anticipation, ESPN chose the game for the location of its weekly College GameDay broadcast.The 2005 Texas Longhorns football team (variously "Texas" or "UT" or the "Horns") was coached by head football coach Mack Brown and led on the field by quarterback Vince Young. The 2005 Ohio State Buckeyes football team (variously "Ohio State" or "OSU" or the "Bucks") was coached by Jim Tressel. Justin Zwick and Troy Smith shared time as quarterback due to disciplinary measures enforced against Smith. The game was a back-and-forth affair which was ultimately won by Texas, 25–22. The game's attendance was 105,565, which set the then all-time attendance record for Ohio Stadium. The game was televised nationally on ABC and drew 9.9 million viewers.ESPN and College Football Rivals, were among the observers who named the game one of the best football games of the season. Texas' win kept them near the front of the national championship picture. They ultimately finished the season unbeaten, snaring the Big 12 Conference and NCAA championships. Ohio State finished the season with ten wins and two losses and ranked No. 4 in the nation.

2007 Holiday Bowl

The 2007 Pacific Life Holiday Bowl was a college football bowl game played December 27, 2007 in San Diego. It was part of the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season and one of 32 games in the 2007–2008 bowl season. It featured the Texas Longhorns against the Arizona State Sun Devils. Texas won 52–34 and set Holiday Bowl records for the earliest score and for most points scored in the first quarter. Texas also set a school record for most points scored in a bowl game. A bizarre play involving Chris Jessee, a member of the Longhorn football operations staff and the stepson of the Texas head coach, has been cited as one of the strangest plays of the season.

2007 Texas Longhorns football team

The 2007 Texas Longhorns football team (variously "Texas" or "UT" or the "Horns") represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Mack Brown. The Longhorns played their home games in Darrell K Royal–Texas Memorial Stadium (DKR).

The Longhorns entered the 2007 season ranked third on all-time college football lists in both total wins and winning percentage. A pre-season ranking by ESPN writer Mark Schlabach had the Longhorns ranked eighth, while College Football News ranked Texas third. The Longhorns came into the season ranked fourth in both the Coaches Poll and AP Poll. During the preceding summer five players had been disciplined for legal infractions, another suspended for NCAA rule violations, and a coach had undergone surgery for cancer. Additional players were suspended during the season.The Longhorns played games against two opponents they had never faced previously: Arkansas State University and the University of Central Florida (UCF). The Longhorns narrowly achieved a victory in their home opener with Arkansas State, and in their first road game of the season, Texas was the inaugural opponent for the UCF Knights in their new stadium. In preseason speculation, games against Texas Christian University (TCU) and Oklahoma (OU) were considered among the top 20 games to watch during the 2007 college football season.

The Longhorns lost conference games to the Kansas State Wildcats, the Oklahoma Sooners, and the Texas A&M Aggies. In two close games, they avoided upset attempts by lower-ranked Nebraska and Oklahoma State, the latter game involving a 21-point fourth quarter comeback by the Horns. Texas concluded its season by winning the 2007 Holiday Bowl against the Arizona State Sun Devils—another first-time opponent for Texas—bringing their season record to 10–3.The Horns finished the season ranked tenth in the AP poll and in the USA Today coaches poll. After the season, five UT players entered professional football through the 2008 NFL Draft and four others agreed to sign free-agent contracts with NFL teams.

2010 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2010 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 41st season in the National Football League, the 51st overall and the second under the head coach/general manager tandem of Todd Haley and Scott Pioli. The team improved on its 4–12 record from 2009, and won their first AFC West division title since 2003. In 2010, the Chiefs moved training camp to Missouri Western State University in St. Joseph, Missouri after spending the previous 19 summers in River Falls, Wisconsin.

2011 Pro Bowl

The 2011 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2010 season. It took place at 7:00 p.m. EST (2:00 p.m. local time) on Sunday, January 30, 2011 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The NFC defeated the AFC, 55–41.

2012 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2012 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League, the 53rd overall and the first and only full season under head coach Romeo Crennel, who served as the interim head coach for the final three games of the 2011 season following Todd Haley's termination. The Chiefs failed to rebound from their 7–9 record in 2011, and were eliminated from playoff contention in Week 12. Although sharing the same 2–14 record as the Jacksonville Jaguars for the worst record of the season, the Chiefs were statistically the worst team overall, and thereby "earned" the right to the first pick in the 2013 NFL Draft. Perhaps the only bright moment for the Chiefs this season was rallying from a big 24–6 deficit against the New Orleans Saints during their season. The Chiefs went 0–12 against AFC opponents in 2012 and their only wins of the season were against NFC teams, against Carolina and New Orleans. In 2017, ESPN.com named the 2012 season the Chiefs worst season in franchise history.

2013 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2013 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 54th season and the first under the head coach/general manager tandem of Andy Reid and John Dorsey. After their 26–16 defeat of the Philadelphia Eagles in week 3, the Chiefs beat their 2-game win total from 2012. After defeating the New York Giants 31–7 in week 4, the Chiefs became the first team in NFL history to win 2 or fewer games in the previous season, and win the first 4 games the next. On October 13, 2013 against the Oakland Raiders, Chiefs fans broke the Guinness World Record for loudest crowd roar at an outdoor stadium with 137.6 decibels. Seattle Seahawks fans later reclaimed the record on December 2, 2013, with a roar of 137.6 decibels. After the Indianapolis Colts defeated the Denver Broncos in week 7, the Chiefs were the final undefeated team in the NFL. They were the first team in NFL history to earn the number one draft pick and be the last undefeated team in consecutive years.The Chiefs clinched a playoff berth, but lost to the Indianapolis Colts in the Wild Card round of the playoffs by a score of 45–44, after blowing a 38–10 second half lead, extending an 8-game playoff losing streak dating back to the 1993 season, which was the worst in NFL history.

2015 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2015 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 46th season in the National Football League, the 56th overall and the third under the head coach/general manager tandem of Andy Reid and John Dorsey. The Chiefs went through a poor start in their first 6 games as they were 1–5, and lost their star running back, Jamaal Charles due to a torn ACL in his right knee during an 18–17 Week 5 loss at home against the Chicago Bears. In week 16, after their 9th consecutive victory and the Baltimore Ravens defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers, the Chiefs clinched a playoff berth, their 2nd in 3 years. They are the first team since the 1970 Cincinnati Bengals to start the season 1–5 and qualify for the playoffs. They also set the franchise record for the most consecutive victories, winning 10 in a row. In their wildcard matchup, the Chiefs played the Houston Texans. The Chiefs defeated the Texans 30–0 to earn their first playoff win in 22 years. The following week, they were defeated by the New England Patriots in the Divisional round by a score of 27–20.

Two Chiefs took home awards at the 5th Annual NFL Honors honoring performances from the 2015 season. Cornerback Marcus Peters won Defensive Rookie of the Year after leading the NFL in interceptions. Safety Eric Berry won Comeback Player of the Year after a Pro Bowl season the year after having his season cut short due to a lymphoma diagnosis.

All-American Bowl (high school football)

The All-American Bowl is a high school football all-star game, held annually at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. Typically played in January, the All-American Bowl is played between all-star teams representing the eastern and western United States.

16 All-Americans have been Heisman Trophy finalists, and 453 have played in the National Football League; notable alumni have included Andrew Luck, Jamaal Charles, Patrick Peterson, Adrian Peterson, Odell Beckham Jr., Eric Berry, Tim Tebow, Joe Thomas, Tyron Smith, Robert Quinn, C.J. Mosley and DeMarco Murray.The All-American Bowl was previously organized by All-American Games; in 2019, the game's broadcaster NBC Sports announced that it had acquired the game and its assets for an undisclosed amount.

Bill Kuharich

Bill Kuharich is an American professional football executive, specializing in player-personnel (i.e., evaluating and selecting players); he has also held the General Manager position. Kuharich is the son of Joe Kuharich, former college and NFL head coach. He attended Middlebury College graduating in 1976 with a degree in History, and received a master's degree in education from St. Lawrence University. He also attended Deerfield Academy, Malvern Preparatory School and Waldron Academy.

In the mid-1980s, Kuharich was Assistant General Manager/Director of Player Personnel for the Philadelphia/Baltimore Stars of the United States Football League. The team won the USFL championship two out of the three years the league existed.

Kuharich worked in multiple capacities for the New Orleans Saints, from 1986 to 1999, as: Director of Player Personnel (1986–1993); Vice President of Football Operations (1994–1995); Executive Vice President/General Manager (1996); and, President/General Manager/Chief Operating Officer (1997–1999). During his tenure, the team acquired (eventual) Pro Bowl-grade players such as Willie Roaf, Sammy Knight, and La'Roi Glover.

As the Kansas City Chiefs' Pro Personnel Director (2000-2005), Kuharich helped orchestrate the acquisitions of Priest Holmes, Eddie Kennison, Trent Green and (eventual Pro Football Hall of Famer), Willie Roaf. Kuharich was promoted to Vice-President of Player Personnel in 2006; between 2006 and 2008, they acquired standouts like Tamba Hali; Dwayne Bowe; Brandon Flowers; Jamaal Charles, and Brandon Carr. Kuharich was released by the Chiefs on April 29, 2009.

On February 11, 2014, Kuharich was hired by the Cleveland Browns to advise first-time General Manager Ray Farmer on player-personnel. Farmer had worked under Kuharich when both were with the Chiefs.

On May 20, 2014, Kuharich was named Executive Chief of staff by the Cleveland Browns. Kuharich plays a pivotal role in the organization's personnel's moves, including the college and pro scouting departments, serving as a key cog in all facets of the Brown' process of evaluating and acquiring talent. He will also assist GM Ray Farmer in key decisions in the team's overall strategic vision as well as decisions involving NFL league matters.

Jamaal

Jamaal is a masculine given name. Notable people include:

Jamaal Anderson (born 1986), American football player

Jamaal Branch (born 1981), American football player

Jamaal Charles (born 1986), American football player

Jamaal Franklin (born 1991), American basketball player

Jamaal Fudge (born 1983), American football player

Jamaal Green (born 1980), American football player

Jamaal Jackson (born 1980), American football player

Jamaal Lascelles (born 1993), English footballer

Jamaal Magloire (born 1978), Canadian basketball player

Jamaal Smith (born 1988), Guyanese footballer

Jamaal Tatum (born 1984), American basketball player

Jamaal Tinsley (born 1978), American basketball player

Jamaal Torrance (born 1983), American sprinter

Jamaal Westerman (born 1985), American football player

Jamaal Wilkes (born 1953), American basketball player

Kansas City Chiefs awards

This page details awards won by the Kansas City Chiefs, a professional American football team from the National Football League. The Chiefs have never had a winner of the Coach of the Year award, Offensive Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year. The Chiefs are tied with the Chicago Bears for the most winners of the Walter Payton Man of the Year award with 5.

The most recent winner of a major NFL award is Patrick Mahomes who won league MVP for the 2018 season, the Chiefs first ever winner of league MVP.

The Chiefs have two awards that are awarded by the team which are voted on by the players and coaches. The Derrick Thomas award is awarded to the team MVP and the Mack Lee Hill award is awarded to the Rookie of the Year.

List of Kansas City Chiefs records

This article details statistics relating to the Kansas City Chiefs National Football League (NFL) American football team, including career, single season and games records.

Mike Cox (fullback)

Micheal Lawrence Cox (born July 11, 1985) is a former American football fullback. He played college football for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. He was undrafted in the 2008 NFL Draft, but signed as a free agent with the Kansas City Chiefs. Cox graduated from Red Land High School in 2004.

Undrafted in 2008 he began as the starting fullback job opening up in New England having two receptions. Cox paved the way for Jamaal Charles to rush for a 1,000 yards in 2009 and Cox scored his only NFL touchdown in the season finale against the Denver Broncos. The next year Cox Was the blocking full back for the chiefs to lead the NFL in rushing in 2010. The chiefs went 10-6 and won the AFC West but lost in the wild card round to the Ravens. Cox was then released by Chiefs and he signed with the Atlanta Falcons in 2011 and appeared in 9 games with the team. He was cut in 2012 after the Falcons signed Lousaka Polite. On November 7, 2012, Cox re-signed with the Falcons after the team released Polite. Cox was with the Falcons the rest of 2012 through the playoffs starting the NFC championship game in a close defeat to the San Francisco 49er’s, where Cox had his only carry as a falcon. A 4 yard rush coming out from the Falcon 1 yard line. Ending his career playing in 59 games with 27 receptions, 5 carries and one touchdown.

Nate Eachus

Nathan Eachus (born June 15, 1990) is a former American football running back. He was signed by the Chiefs as an undrafted free agent in 2012. He played college football for Colgate University.

Eachus played high school football at Hazleton Area High School in Hazleton, Pennsylvania and was only recruited by Hofstra, Maine and Colgate. Eachus was also a standout wrestler in high school.At Colgate, Eachus was named to the Patriot League first team three times and set the Patriot League record for single-game rushing yards. As a senior, he was a consensus first team All-American, the Patriot League Offensive Player of the Year and a finalist for the Walter Payton Award. After being passed over in the 2012 NFL Draft, he signed with the Kansas City Chiefs on April 28, 2012.Eachus finished third in the league in rushing yards in the 2012 NFL preseason. During the regular season, he served as the primary blocker for Pro Bowl running back Jamaal Charles. Eachus appeared in a total of eleven games, rushed for 18 yards and caught one pass for 19 yards. He was released before the 2013 season after the Chiefs replaced head coach Romeo Crennel with Andy Reid.After his brief NFL career, Eachus worked variously as a personal trainer, high school football coach and wholesaler of hemp products.In 2017, Eachus signed with the Boston Blaze of the Can-Am Indoor Football League.

Spencer Ware

Spencer Raleigh Ware III (born November 23, 1991) is an American football running back who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the sixth round of the 2013 NFL Draft. He played in the 2010 U.S. Army All-American Bowl. He played college football at LSU.

Texas Longhorns football statistical leaders

The Texas Longhorns football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Texas Longhorns football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Longhorns represent the University of Texas in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although Texas began competing in intercollegiate football in 1893, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1950. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Longhorns have played in a bowl game in all but one season since then, allowing players to have an additional game to accumulate statistics.

Similarly, the Longhorns have played in the Big 12 Championship Game (1996–2010, 2017–present) six times, providing yet another game for players in those seasons.

All of the Longhorns' 10 highest seasons in points scored, and all but one of the top 10 seasons in offensive yards, came under former head coach Mack Brown, who coached Texas from 1998 through 2013.These lists are updated through the 2018 Big 12 Championship Game.

Air
Ground

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