Jalen Brunson

Jalen Marquis Brunson[1] (born August 31, 1996) is an American professional basketball player for the Dallas Mavericks of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for Villanova University, where he was the National Player of the Year as a junior and won two national championships.

According to ESPN, he ended his junior year of high school for Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, Illinois as the number one point guard in the country and prior to his senior year he was rated number one by Scout.com. He was selected as the 2014 Illinois Boys Basketball Gatorade Player of the Year. He was selected to participate in the 2015 McDonald's All-American Boys Game as well as the 2015 Jordan Brand Classic and to represent the Team USA in the Nike Hoop Summit. As a senior, he repeated as the 2015 Illinois Gatorade Player of the Year and earned a third Associated Press All-state recognition (2nd first team). That year, he led Stevenson to the Illinois High School Association (IHSA) Class 4A championship. Following the season, he won Illinois Mr. Basketball. He completed his senior season in the 2014–15 academic year.

Brunson holds the IHSA playoff single-game and the IHSA Class 4A championship game scoring records and set the USA Basketball single-game assist record for the FIBA Americas Under-18 Championship. He earned the MVP of the 2015 FIBA Under-19 World Cup for the gold medal-winning Team USA. He is the son of nine-year NBA veteran Rick Brunson.

He began his college career as the 2015–16 Big East Conference Preseason Freshman of the Year and was a Big East All-Freshman Team selection following the season. As a starter, he helped the 2015–16 Wildcats win the championship game of the 2016 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. As a sophomore, he was a unanimous 2016–17 All-Big East first team selection for the 2016–17 Wildcats. As a junior, he was the National Player of the Year and a Consensus first-team 2018 All-Americans and he helped the 2017–18 Wildcats win the championship game of the 2018 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament to give Villanova their second National Championship in three years.

Jalen Brunson
20170213 Villanova-Depaul Jalen Brunson bringing the ball upcourt
No. 13 – Dallas Mavericks
PositionPoint guard
LeagueNBA
Personal information
BornAugust 31, 1996 (age 22)
New Brunswick, New Jersey
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Listed weight190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High schoolStevenson (Lincolnshire, Illinois)
CollegeVillanova (2015–2018)
NBA draft2018 / Round: 2 / Pick: 33rd overall
Selected by the Dallas Mavericks
Playing career2018–present
Career history
2018–presentDallas Mavericks
Career highlights and awards
Stats at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Early life

Born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Brunson was raised in southern New Jersey until sixth grade. He is the son of Rick and Sandra Brunson.[2] He has a sister Erica (born c. 2001).[3] His parents met at Temple University where Rick played for the Owls men's basketball team and Sandra played volleyball.[2] Rick went on to spend nine seasons in the NBA.[3] The family first settled in Cherry Hill, New Jersey but moved seven times before settling in Lincolnshire, Illinois in 2010 where Jalen played his high school career for Stevenson High School.[2]

High school career

20130316 Jalen Brunson
Brunson in the 2013 IHSA Class 4A championship game

As a freshman, Brunson was an All–Lake County honorable mention selection in 2012,[4] as Stevenson finished the season with a 17–11 record.[5] During his sophomore season, Stevenson started the season 10–4 before going on a 19-game winning streak.[6] That year, Brunson led Stevenson to the March 16, 2013 IHSA Class 4A championship game against Jabari Parker and Kendrick Nunn's three-time defending state champion Simeon Career Academy, where he got the Simeon backcourt in foul trouble in the first half before being held to one point in the second half of a 58–40 loss. Stevenson finished the season 29–5.[7] Following the season, the Associated Press named him to the Class 4A All-state second team as the only sophomore on the first or second team.[8] Brunson averaged 21.5 points that season.[9]

20140322 Jalen Brunson in IHSA consolation game (16)
Brunson in the 2014 IHSA Class 4A consolation game

On February 21, 2014, junior Brunson scored 57 points in a double overtime victory over Lake Forest High School. The performance gave him both the school single-game and career scoring records.[10][11] On March 21, Brunson set the IHSA playoff single game scoring record against the Jahlil Okafor–led Whitney Young High School by scoring 56 points in a 75–68 state playoff semi-final loss.[12] In the game, still images of a movement by Brunson appeared to be an obscene gesture, but video of the gesture were deemed to be inconclusive and an initial suspension for the subsequent consolation game was overturned.[13][14] Brunson averaged 26.1 points, 5.4 rebounds, 4.7 assists and 2.9 steals for a Stevenson team that finished the season with a 32–2 record.[15][9] Two members of his high school team were National Football League athletes' offspring: Matt Morrissey and Cameron Green.[10] Brunson was named Gatorade Player of the Year for the state of Illinois as a junior.[16] Following the season, Associated Press named him as the only non-senior on the Class 4A All-state first team that also included Okafor, Cliff Alexander, Tyler Ulis and Sean O'Mara.[17] He finished fourth in the 2014 Illinois Mr. Basketball voting.[18] In April 2014, Illinois, Purdue, Kansas and Villanova had in-home visits.[19] On May 3, 2014, he announced the eight schools that he was considering playing college basketball for: UConn, Michigan State, Illinois, Kansas, Purdue, Villanova, Michigan and Temple.[20] That summer he was the number one rated point guard according to ESPN,[2] although the class had a notable shortage of elite pure point guards.[21] On June 25—the day after Jalen won a gold medal at the 2014 FIBA Americas Under-18 Championship—Rick Brunson received an offer as an on-bench assistant coach from Temple.[22] The Temple offer fell through when Rick Brunson was arrested on various charges on July 25, and Temple fell out of the running for Jalen's services.[23][24] Brunson participated in the July 9–11 LeBron James Skills Academy.[25] On August 5, he announced official visits to Illinois on August 29–31, Villanova on September 4–6 and then Temple from September 11–13 and on August 9, he announced official visits to Michigan State from September 19–21 and Purdue on September 26–28.[26]

On September 8, Brunson announced that he would be curtailing his recruitment and making his decision between Illinois and Villanova on September 10.[27] On that date, Brunson committed to Villanova.[24][28][29] At the time of his decision, he was ranked as the number one point guard in the national class of 2015 by Scout.com.[23] Stevenson was a preseason top-10 team in the MaxPreps national high school rankings.[30] A lot was expected of Brunson's team after losing to teams led by Parker and Okafor in the IHSA tournament final four in 2013 and 2014 even though no team from Lake County has ever won a state basketball championship.[9] The team rattled off 11 straight victories to start the season before losing 88–81 to Chaminade Prep and its star Jayson Tatum in the Cancer Research Classic in Wheeling, WV, despite 48 points from Brunson.[31][32][33] On January 17, Brunson and Stevenson faced Derryck Thornton, Jr. and Findlay Prep at the Hoophall Classic. At the time, Brunson was the number 3 ranked point guard in the class of 2015 and Thornton was the number 2 ranked point guard in the class of 2016 for the number 1 team in the country according to USA Today.[34] Findlay, who was led by Arizona signee Allonzo Trier's 27 points, held Brunson to 26 in the second loss of the season for Stevenson,[35] who had been 15–1.[36] On January 28, he was named to the 2015 McDonald's All-American Boys Game roster,[37] becoming the second player from Lake County to earn such recognition.[38] On February 2, he was named to the 11-man Team USA for the Nike Hoop Summit.[39] On February 21, Stevenson lost to Simeon as Brunson posted 25 points on 9–24 shooting, ending a 22-game in-state streak in a game that featured the top two teams in the state.[40] The Simeon frontline featured three Big Ten Conference signees: D. J. Williams (Illinois), Ed Morrow (Nebraska) and Isaiah Moss (Iowa).[41] On March 5, he was named to the Jordan Brand Classic roster.[42]

20150321 IHSA Class 4A championship game Jalen Brunson's first basket
Brunson scoring the first 3 of his IHSA Class 4A title game record 30 points in 2015

On March 17, Brunson helped Stevenson qualify for a third consecutive appearance in the IHSA final four with a victory over Riverside Brookfield Township High School. In the game, Brunson became the Lake County career scoring record holder.[43][44] On March 19, Brunson received the highest vote total for the Illinois Class 4A Associated Press All-state team.[45] On March 20, he repeated as Illinois Gatorade Player of the Year.[46] Brunson led Stevenson to the IHSA final four for a third consecutive time, but he led the team to the first state championship by a Lake county school with an IHSA Class 4A title-game record 30 points in a 57–40 victory over Normal Community High School. Brunson was 9-for-15 from the field and 9-for-9 from the free throw line.[47][48] 2015 was Lake county's ninth consecutive year with a team reaching the IHSA final four; Stevenson became the first school in the large school division and the third school overall to win IHSA football and basketball state championships in the same year.[49] The win got him out of the shadow of IHSA final four losses to Parker- and Okafor-led teams.[50] Following the season, he won Illinois Mr. Basketball with 552 points and 99 of the 132 first place votes, ahead of fellow Jordan Brand All-American selection Charles Matthews, who had 157 points.[38] Brunson finished his senior season with averages of 23.3 points, 5.2 assists and 4.7 rebounds per game and with shooting percentages of 38% on three-point shots and 83% on free throws.[38] At the March 30 POWERADE Jam Fest associated with the McDonald's All-American game, Brunson won the skills competition over finalists Carlton Bragg and Isaiah Briscoe and was a finalist for the three-point shooting contest.[51][52] Brunson was a first-team Parade All-American,[53] as well as a third-team USA Today All-USA high school basketball team selection.[54] In the April 11 Nike Hoops Summit, Brunson had 12 points and 7 assists in a 103–101 loss.[55][56][57] In the April 17 Jordan Brand Classic, Brunson had a game-high 3 steals.[58] He finished his high school career ranked No. 16 in the ESPN 100 and as the #2-point guard (behind Isaiah Briscoe).[59]

Scouting report

Brunson, like his father, is a left-handed basketball player.[15] In what is regarded as a weak point guard class, Brunson is the only true point guard that was ranked in the top 25 players at the conclusion of the class of 2015's junior season.[60] In addition to high ratings by the recruiting services, Brunson's peers voted him to be the best passer in high school basketball prior to his senior season.[61] At the time of his September 2014 commitment to Villanova, he was described by ESPN writer Reggie Rankin as "a left-handed, pass-first lead guard that excels at running his team and can also score as needed".[28] ESPN's Paul Biancardi also used the "pass-first point guard" description.[29]

US college sports recruiting information for high school athletes
Name Hometown High school / college Height Weight Commit date
Jalen Brunson
PG
Lincolnshire, IL Stevenson (IL) 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 190 lb (86 kg) Sep 10, 2014 
Recruiting star ratings: Scout:
5 stars
   Rivals:
5 stars
   247SportsN/A    ESPN:
5 stars
   ESPN grade: 90
Overall recruiting rankings: Scout: 16, 1 (IL), 1 (PG)   Rivals: 15, 5 (G)  ESPN: 16, 1 (IL), 2 (PG)
  • Note: In many cases, Scout, Rivals, 247Sports, and ESPN may conflict in their listings of height and weight.
  • In these cases, the average was taken. ESPN grades are on a 100-point scale.

Sources:

  • "Villanova 2015 Basketball Commitments". Rivals.com. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  • "2015 Villanova Basketball Commits". Scout.com. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  • "ESPN". ESPN.com. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  • "Scout.com Team Recruiting Rankings". Scout.com. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  • "2015 Team Ranking". Rivals.com. Retrieved April 21, 2015.

College career

First year

Brunson was a selection to the 20-man Bob Cousy Award preseason watchlist.[62] He was also selected as the 2015–16 Big East Conference Preseason Freshman of the Year by the conference coaches although Henry Ellenson was the only freshman selected to the 2015–16 Preseason All-Big East First or Second Team. Brunson's 2015–16 Wildcats were the unanimous coaches preseason selection to win the conference.[63] In preseason top 100 player rankings Brunson was ranked 46 by ESPN and 41 by NBC Sports.[64][65] During the preseason, Mike Rutherford of SB Nation selected Brunson as one of its 10 most important college basketball players for 2015–16.[66] He made the initial 50-man John R. Wooden Award watch list on November 17.[67] On December 2, Brunson earned recognition on the 18-man Wayman Tisdale Award watchlist.[68]

Brunson opened the season in the starting lineup with 12 points and 4 assists against the Fairleigh Dickinson Knights on November 13.[69] On November 26 in the semi-finals of the NIT Season Tip-Off against Stanford, Brunson posted 18 points.[70] On December 28, he posted a career-high 22 points against Penn.[71][72] The 22-point effort was part of a 3–0 week for Villanova in which Brunson averaged 15.3 points and earned Big East Freshman of the Week.[73] On February 8, the 2015–16 Wildcats became the first Villanova Wildcats men's basketball team to reach number one in the AP Poll by climbing to the top of the 2015–16 NCAA Division I men's basketball rankings.[74] Following the 2015–16 Big East season, he was a unanimous Big East All-Freshman Team selection.[75] In the 2016 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament regional final against Kansas Brunson made the final two free throws that gave the Wildcats a two-possession lead with 3.5 seconds left.[76] The 2015–16 Wildcats won the championship game of the tournament by defeating the North Carolina Tar Heels 77–74, with Brunson as a starter.[77][78]

Second year

Brunson was a selection to the 20-man Bob Cousy Award preseason watchlist again as a sophomore.[79] He was a preseason All-Big East honorable mention selection.[80] On December 5, the 2016–17 Wildcats ascended into the top position in the 2016–17 NCAA Division I men's basketball rankings.[81][82] The following night, Brunson posted a then career-high 26 points in a Philadelphia Big 5 win over La Salle.[83][84] After helping guide Villanova to a victory in its 2016–17 Big East season opener against DePaul on December 28,[85] Brunson scored a career high 27 points in an 80–70 December 31 win over No. 10 Creighton to propel No. 1 Villanova to a 14–0 record and 2–0 in conference play.[86] These two performances earned Brunson Big East player of the week recognition on January 2.[87] Brunson was named to the February 9 Naismith Award Top 30 watch list.[88] On February 18 against Seton Hall, Brunson posted his first career double double with a career-high 10 assists and 22 points.[89][90] Following the regular season, he was one of four unanimous selections to the 2016–17 All-Big East first team.[91] After averaging 14.7 points and 4.1 assists as a sophomore, Brunson decided to return to Villanova for his junior season.[92] After the season ended and the 2017 NBA draft class was finalized, Brunson was projected to be a preseason All-American by NBC Sports.[93]

Junior year

He was the 2017–18 preseason All-Big East player of the year.[94] He was a pre-season All-American selection by Associated Press (1st team)[95] and ESPN (2nd team).[96] He was a preseason John R. Wooden Award, Oscar Robertson Trophy, Lute Olson Award and Naismith College Player of the Year watchlist honoree.[97][98][99][100] Brunson led Villanova to the championship of the 2017 Battle 4 Atlantis, earning the MVP of the tournament and being recognized on November 27 as the Big East Player of the Week.[101] On December 13, Brunson scored a career-high 31 points, including 22 in the first half, to lift the Wildcats over Temple 87–67.[102] The next time he would score 31 points in a game was on December 30, 2017, when Villanova lost its first game of the season to Butler.[103] He posted a third 31-point total on January 28 to help Villanova to an 85–82 victory over Marquette.[104]

Brunson was named as an Academic All-District selection, making him one of 40 finalists for the 15-man Academic All-America team.[105] He was named as one of 10 semi-finalists for the Naismith Award.[106] He was named as one of 20 late-season finalists for the Wooden Award.[107] Following the regular season, Brunson was one of three unanimous 2017–18 All-Big East selections,[108] and he was named both the Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year and the Big East Scholar-Athlete of the Year a few days later.[109] As a scholar, he was on pace to graduate during the summer after his junior season.[109] He was a consensus first-team All-American after being selected as a first-team All-American by Sporting News,[110] USBWA,[111] Associated Press,[112] and NABC.[113] He was also awarded the USBWA Oscar Robertson Trophy[114] the Associated Press College Basketball Player of the Year,[115] the Naismith College Player of the Year,[116] the John R. Wooden Award,[117] the NABC Player of the Year,[118] CBS Sports National Player of the Year,[119] the Bob Cousy Award,[120] and Sporting News Player of the Year.[121] Brunson was a second-team Academic All-America selection.[122] Brunson was named Most Outstanding Player of the East Region and was joined on the East Region All-tournament team by Omari Spellman and Eric Paschall.[123] Villanova won the National Championship Game of the 2018 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament.[124] Following his junior season, he declared for the 2018 NBA draft and hired an agent.[125][126]

Professional career

Dallas Mavericks (2018–present)

On June 21, 2018, the Dallas Mavericks drafted Brunson with the 33rd overall pick. He was the fourth and final Villanova player to be selected in the 2018 NBA draft.[127][128] Brunson did not sign until after he completed his 2018 NBA Summer League play and was accorded a 4-year contract similar to a first round selection with 3-years guaranteed.[129] He made his NBA debut on October 17, 2018, recording 3 points, 1 rebound and assist, in a 100–121 loss against the Phoenix Suns.[130] After coming off the bench for his first four NBA games, Brunson started in place of the injured Dennis Smith Jr. on October 26, against the Toronto Raptors, scoring 8 points, 4 assists and 3 rebounds.[131][132] On November 8, Brunson posted a career-high 11 points against Utah Jazz.[133] Brunson posted 7 assists on December 5 against the New Orleans Pelicans.[134] Then, Brunson replaced Smith in the starting lineup and posted career highs of 14 points on December 8 against the Houston Rockets and 17 points on December 10 against the Orlando Magic.[135][136] On January 5 (a night he was honored by the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association as its Amateur Athlete of the Year),[137] with J. J. Barea and Devin Harris sidelined, Brunson posted 13 points, a career-high 11 rebounds and a career-high 8 assists on January 5 against the Philadelphia 76ers for his first professional double-double.[138] Starting in place of Luka Doncic on February 22, Brunson posted a career-high 22 points against the Denver Nuggets.[139] Then with Doncic back in the lineup, Brunson scored 24 on February 28 against the Indiana Pacers.[140] On March 12, 2019, Brunson improved upon his career high with 34 points with five rebounds, four assists and a steal in a 105–112 loss to the San Antonio Spurs.[141] On April 7 following a night off for rest purposes, Brunson posted a career-high 10 assists along with 12 points against the Memphis Grizzlies for his second career double-double.[142][143]

National team career

On May 5, 2014, USA Basketball announced the 21 athletes (including Brunson) invited to try out from June 10 to 19 for the 12-member USA national team for the June 20–24, 2014 FIBA Americas Under-18 Championship.[144] Eventually, 24 players tried out for the team and the roster was cut to 15 on June 12.[145] Brunson made the final 12-man roster that was announced on June 15.[146] In the opening game, Brunson surpassed Stephon Marbury's 12 assists against Brazil in the 1994 FIBA Americas U18 Championship by recording 13 against Uruguay to set a new USA Basketball U18 single-game assist record.[147][148] The United States claimed a gold medal in the tournament.[149] On August 16, 2014, Brunson was named to the Nike Global Challenge USA All-Tournament team along with Stephen Zimmerman, D J Hogg, Malik Monk, Jaylen Brown and Edrice Adebayo.[150][151] Brunson led the Midwest team to a third-place finish in the eight-team tournament.[27]

On June 18, 2015 Brunson was announced as a member of the 12-man 2015 USA Basketball Men's U19 World Cup Team for the 2015 FIBA Under-19 World Cup.[152] Brunson earned MVP of the tournament, after leading the team with 5.6 assists and 2.1 steals for the tournament. He posted a game-high 30 points in the semi-finals against Greece,[153] and he tallied a team-high 14 points including 6 in overtime as well as 7 assists, 5 rebounds and a steal in the gold medal game against Croatia. Brunson tied teammate Harry Giles, with a 14.0 average for the tournament.[154][155] He dominated in the final two games.[156] Based on this performance, he was recognized as the USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year, on December 21, 2015.[157]

Career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

NBA

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2018–19 Dallas 73 38 21.8 .467 .348 .725 2.3 3.2 .5 .1 9.3
Career 73 38 21.8 .467 .348 .725 2.3 3.2 .5 .1 9.3

College

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2015–16 Villanova 40 39 24.0 .452 .383 .774 1.8 2.5 .7 .0 9.6
2016–17 Villanova 36 36 31.1 .541 .378 .876 2.6 4.1 .9 .0 14.7
2017–18 Villanova 40 40 31.8 .521 .408 .802 3.1 4.6 .9 .0 18.9
Career 116 115 28.9 .510 .393 .820 2.5 3.7 .8 .0 14.4

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External links

2015 FIBA Under-19 World Championship

The 2015 FIBA Under-19 World Championship was hosted by Heraklion, Greece, from 27 June to 5 July 2015.

It was the third time that Greece hosts the FIBA Under-19 World Championship since 1995 in Athens, when Greece won the gold medal. Greece also hosted the 2003 tournament in Thessaloniki.

As a result of FIBA rules changes, made effective as of 1 October 2014, this tournament marked the first time that the FIBA Under-19 World Championship used instant replay to review controversial plays and where players were allowed to wear any jersey with numbers from "00" to "99".

The United States won their sixth title by defeating Croatia 79–71 in the final.

2015 McDonald's All-American Boys Game

The 2015 McDonald's All-American Boys Game is an All-star basketball game that was played on April 1, 2015 at the United Center in Chicago, home of the Chicago Bulls. It was the 38th annual McDonald's All-American Game for high school boys. The game's rosters features the best and most highly recruited blue chip boys high school basketball players graduating in 2015. Chicago, which became the first city to host the game in back-to-back years in 2012, continues to host the game annually for the fifth consecutive time. When the rosters for the game were announced on January 28, 15 of the 24 players had committed to Division I basketball programs; Duke and LSU led the field with two commits each.On March 10, 2015, Ben Simmons was named the Morgan Wootten Award winner, regarded as the McDonald's All-American national player of the year award. In the game, the East team—led by MVP Cheick Diallo's 18 points and 10 rebounds—defeated the West team by a 111–91 margin. In the associated Jam Fest, Dwayne Bacon, Luke Kennard and Jalen Brunson won the slam dunk contest, three-point shooting contest and skills competition, respectively.

2015–16 Big East Conference men's basketball season

The 2015–16 Big East Conference men's basketball season began with practices in October 2015, followed by the start of the followed by the start of the 2015–16 NCAA Division I men's basketball season in November. The season marked the 37th year in the conference's history, but the third as a non-football conference, which officially formed on July 1, 2013. Conference play began on December 30, 2015, and concluded in March with the 2016 Big East Men's Basketball Tournament at Madison Square Garden in New York.

Villanova won the regular season championship by two games over Xavier with a 16–2 conference record. However, Seton Hall, who finished in third, won the Big East Tournament, defeating Villanova in the championship game. Providence's Kris Dunn was named the conference's player of the year for the second straight year, while Seton Hall coach Kevin Willard and Villanova coach Jay Wright shared coach of the year.

Creighton received a bid to the National Invitation Tournament and lost in the quarterfinals.

Villanova, Xavier, Seton Hall, Providence and Butler all received bids to the NCAA Tournament. Only Villanova advanced past the Second Round of the Tournament. On April 4, Villanova defeated North Carolina in the National Championship game to win the school's second NCAA Championship. Ryan Arcidiacono was named the Most Outstanding Player of the Tournament.

2015–16 Villanova Wildcats men's basketball team

The 2015–16 Villanova Wildcats men's basketball team represented Villanova University in the 2015–16 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Led by the school's 8th head coach Jay Wright in his 15th year, the Wildcats were members of the Big East Conference and played most of their home games at The Pavilion, with some select home games at the Wells Fargo Center. The Wildcats finished the season with a record of 35–5, 16–2 to win the Big East regular season. They lost in the championship of the Big East Tournament to Seton Hall. The Wildcats earned an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as a No. 2 seed. In the Tournament, they defeated UNC Asheville, Iowa, Miami, and overall #1 seed Kansas to earn a trip to the Final Four, the fifth in school history (although the 1971 Final Four season was vacated by the NCAA). In the Final Four, the Wildcats routed No. 2 seed Oklahoma by the largest margin in Final Four history to face No. 1 seeded North Carolina for the national championship. Led by Final Four MOP, Ryan Arcidiacono, the Wildcats won the National Championship on a three-point shot by Kris Jenkins, assisted by Arcidiacano, as time expired. The Wildcats won the school's second national title, having previously won the 1985 NCAA Tournament.

Their 35 wins were the most in school history, breaking a record of 33 wins set the previous season. In beating No. 3 seed Miami (AP No. 10), No. 1 seed Kansas (AP No. 1), No. 2 seed Oklahoma (AP No. 7) and No. 1 seed UNC (AP No. 3), Villanova became the first school in 31 years — since the 1985 Villanova Wildcats — to not only beat four top-three seeds on the way to a national title but to also beat four straight opponents ranked in the AP top 10, in addition to beating AP ranked Iowa in the Round of 32, by an average victory margin of 19 points per game. Villanova's run included two of the ten most offensively efficient games in the analytics era (2002–present), beating Miami and Oklahoma by scoring 1.56 and 1.51 points per possession in the Sweet Sixteen and Final Four, respectively. It has been called perhaps the most dominant tournament championship run of all time, and the most dominant of the analytics era by a wide margin.

2016–17 Big East Conference men's basketball season

The 2016–17 Big East Conference men's basketball season began with practices in October 2016, followed by the start of the 2016–17 NCAA Division I men's basketball season in November. This season marked the 38th year in the conference's history, but the fourth as a non-football conference, which officially formed on July 1, 2013. Conference play began on December 31, 2016.

Villanova clinched the regular season championship, their fourth straight Big East regular season championship, with a win over No. 23-ranked Creighton on February 25. Butler finished second, three games behind Villanova.

Villanova shooting guard Josh Hart was named the conference's Player of the Year. Butler head coach Chris Holtmann was named Big East Coach of the Year.The Big East Conference Tournament at Madison Square Garden in New York from March 8 through March 11, 2017. Villanova also won the Big East Conference Tournament beating Creighton in the Tournament championship game. As a result, Villanova received the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament.

Seven Big East Schools (Villanova, Butler, Creighton, Marquette, Providence, Seton Hall, and Xavier) received bids to the NCAA Tournament. The conference finished with a 5–7 record in the Tournament, highlighted by Butler reaching the Sweet Sixteen and Xavier advancing to the Elite Eight.

2017–18 Big East Conference men's basketball season

The 2017–18 Big East Conference men's basketball season began with practices in October 2017, followed by the start of the 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season in November. This season marked the 39th year in the conference's history, but the fifth as a non-football conference, which officially formed on July 1, 2013. Conference play began in December 2017. For the first time since the reconfigured Big East formed, Villanova failed to win the regular-season title, with Xavier claiming the crown.

The 2018 Big East Men's Basketball Tournament was held at Madison Square Garden in New York from March 7 through March 10, 2018. Villanova defeated Providence to win the tournament championship and receive the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament.

Six Big East schools received bids to the NCAA Tournament (Butler, Creighton, Providence, Seton Hall, Villanova, and Xavier). Only Villanova won more than one game in the Tournament, but the Wildcats defeated Michigan to win the NCAA Championship for the second time in three years.

Marquette received a bid to the National Invitation Tournament, where they advanced to the quarterfinals before losing to eventual NIT champions Penn State.

Villanova guard Jalen Brunson was named the Big East Player of the Year and was consensus National Player of the Year. Villanova freshman forward Omari Spellman was named Big East Freshman of the Year. Xavier head coach Chris Mack was named Big East coach of the year.

2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

The 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season began on November 10, 2017. The first tournament was the 2K Sports Classic and the season ended with the Final Four in San Antonio on April 2, 2018. Practices officially began on September 29, 2017.

2017–18 Villanova Wildcats men's basketball team

The 2017–18 Villanova Wildcats men's basketball team represented Villanova University in the 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Led by head coach Jay Wright in his 17th year, the Wildcats played their home games at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as members of the Big East Conference. The Wildcats finished the season 36–4, 14–4 in Big East play to finish in second place. They defeated Marquette, Butler, and Providence to win the Big East Tournament championship. As a result, they received the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament as the No. 1 seed in the East region, their third No.1 seed in four years. They defeated Radford, Alabama, West Virginia, and Texas Tech to advance to the Final Four for the second time in three years. In the National Semifinal, they defeated Kansas before defeating Michigan in the National Championship game to win their second national championship in three years. They won every game of the tournament by a double-digit margin and the team's tournament run has been called the most dominant ever.The Wildcats home court, The Pavilion, underwent a temporary closure for a $60 million renovation project during the season. It will reopen for the 2018–19 season with the new name of Finneran Pavilion after a Villanova alum who donated $22.6 million to Villanova. Accordingly, all home games for the 2017–18 season but one were played at the Wells Fargo Center. The exception was the November 29, 2017 game with Big 5 rival Penn; it was instead held at Jake Nevin Field House, which had been home to the team before the Pavilion's initial 1986 opening.

2018 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 2018 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the Sporting News (TSN), and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) for the 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors choose at least a first and second 5-man team. The NABC, TSN and AP choose third teams, while AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 2018 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams as determined by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since United Press International was replaced by TSN in 1997, the four major selectors have been the aforementioned ones. AP has been a selector since 1948, NABC since 1957 and USBWA since 1960. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors based on a point system computed from the four different all-America teams. The point system consists of three points for first team, two points for second team and one point for third team. No honorable mention or fourth team or lower are used in the computation. The top five totals plus ties are first team and the next five plus ties are second team.Although the aforementioned lists are used to determine consensus honors, there are numerous other All-American lists. The ten finalists for the John Wooden Award are described as Wooden All-Americans. The ten finalists for the Senior CLASS Award are described as Senior All-Americans. Other All-American lists include those determined by USA Today, Fox Sports, Yahoo! Sports and many others. The scholar-athletes selected by College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) are termed Academic All-Americans.

2018–19 Dallas Mavericks season

The 2018–19 Dallas Mavericks season was the 39th season of the franchise in the National Basketball Association (NBA). It was also Dirk Nowitzki's 21st and final season with the Mavericks, making his season debut on December 13, 2018 against the Phoenix Suns. Not only would he break a record previously set by Kobe Bryant for the most seasons spent playing for a single NBA team, but he also became the fifth player in the NBA history to play in the league for 21 seasons. Believed by many as the greatest Maverick of all time, Nowitzki led the Mavs to 15 playoff appearances (2001-2012; 2014-2016), to a Finals appearance in 2006, and to their first championship title in 2011, defeating the Big 3-led Miami Heat. A 14-time NBA All Star, Nowitzki is the first European player to start in an All Star game, and the first to win the MVP Award. He is also the highest scoring foreign-born player in NBA history and on March 18, 2019, became the 6th highest scoring player of all time, surpassing Wilt Chamberlain's 31,419 points. Nowitzki's retirement leaves former Maverick and fellow 1998 draftee Vince Carter as the last remaining active player to have played in the 1990s.

On January 31, 2019, the Mavericks acquired NBA All-Star Kristaps Porziņģis in exchange for Wesley Matthews and former no. 9 overall pick Dennis Smith Jr. With an overtime loss to the New Orleans Pelicans on March 18, the Mavericks would once again have a losing season and not make the playoffs.

Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the men's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded at the end of the league's inaugural season of 1979–80.

The head coaches of the league's teams (currently 10) submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.The award was introduced following the conference's first season in 1980, in which it was presented to John Duren of Georgetown. Patrick Ewing (Georgetown), Richard Hamilton (Connecticut), Troy Bell (Boston College), Troy Murphy (Notre Dame) and Kris Dunn (Providence) each won the award twice, and Chris Mullin (St. John's) won three consecutive times from 1983 through 1985. Three award winners have been inducted as players to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Ewing, who shared the award in 1984 and 1985 with Mullin, was inducted in 2008 after playing 17 years in the National Basketball Association between 1985 and 2002. Mullin followed in 2011 after a 16-year NBA career (1985–2001). Most recently, Georgetown's 1992 Player of the Year Alonzo Mourning entered the Hall in 2014 following a 16-year NBA career (1992–2008). There have been seven ties; the most recent instance was that between Dunn and Ryan Arcidiacono of Villanova in 2015.Seven players have been awarded a major national player of the year award in the same year that they received a Big East Player of the Year award. In 1985, Ewing and Mullin shared the conference award, while Ewing was named Naismith College Player of the Year and Mullin was given the John R. Wooden Award. The following year, Walter Berry of St. John's received the Wooden Award and the Big East Player of the Year award. In 1996, Ray Allen of Connecticut received the conference award and was also the final recipient of the UPI Player of the Year Award. In 2004, Connecticut's Emeka Okafor won the conference award while sharing NABC Player of the Year honors with Jameer Nelson of Saint Joseph's. Creighton's Doug McDermott received all major national awards along with the conference award in 2014. Finally, Villanova's Jalen Brunson was the national player of the year as well in 2018. Georgetown has had the most winners, with eight. The only current Big East members without a winner are Butler and Xavier, both of which joined the conference at its relaunch following its 2013 split into two leagues, and DePaul, members since 2005.

Brunson

Brunson is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alfred Brunson, American politician

Andrew Brunson (born 1968), American Presbyterian pastor in Turkey

Doyle Brunson (born 1933), American poker player

Jalen Brunson (born 1996), American basketball player (son of Rick)

Michael Brunson, political journalist

Ira B. Brunson, American politician

Rick Brunson (born 1972), American basketball player and coach

Rebekkah Brunson (born 1981), American basketball player

Todd Brunson (born 1969), American poker player (son of Doyle)

Tyrone Brunson (disambiguation), multiple people

FIBA Under-19 Basketball World Cup All-Tournament Team

The FIBA Under-19 Basketball World Cup All-Tournament Team is a bi-annual award, that is given by FIBA, to the five best players of the FIBA Under-19 World Cup.

Jalen

Jalen is both a surname and given name. Notable people with the name include:

Janez Jalen (1891–1966), Slovene writer and priest

Jalen Beeks (born 1993), American baseball pitcher

Jalen Brunson (born 1996), American basketball player

Jalen Cannon (born 1993), American basketball player

Jalen Collins (born 1993), American football cornerback

Jalen Davis (born 1996), American football cornerback

Jalen Hurd (born 1995), American football running back

Jalen Hurts (born 1998), American football quarterback

Jalen Lecque (born 2000), American basketball player

Jalen McDaniels (born 1998), American basketball player

Jalen Mills (born 1994), American football defensive back

Jalen Myrick (born 1995), American football player

Jalen Parmele (born 1985), American football running back

Jalen Pokorn (born 1979), Slovenian football midfielder

Jalen Ramsey (born 1994), American football defensive back

Jalen Reeves-Maybin (born 1995), American football player

Jalen Robinson (born 1994), American soccer player

Jalen Rose (born 1973), American professional basketball player

Jalen Saunders (born 1992), American football wide receiver

Jalen Schlachter (born 1992), American football guard

Jalen Tabor (born 1995), American football cornerback

Jalen Tolliver (born 1995), American football player

List of U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards

This article lists U.S. men's college basketball national player of the year awards. Several different organizations sponsor an award for the nation's top player.

Lute Olson Award

The Lute Olson Award is an award given annually to the most outstanding non-freshman men's college basketball player in NCAA Division I competition. The award was established in 2010 and is named for former Arizona Wildcats head coach Lute Olson.

Rick Brunson

Eric Daniel "Rick" Brunson (born June 14, 1972) is an American former professional basketball player and coach who was last an assistant coach of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played 9 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and has also worked as an assistant coach for several teams. He played college basketball for Temple.

USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year

The USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year is an annual award issued by USA Basketball that honors the top American male basketball performer during the year's international competition.

Villanova Wildcats men's basketball

Villanova University's men's basketball team represents Villanova University and competes in the Big East Conference of NCAA Division I College basketball. Their first season was the 1920–21 season. Named the "Wildcats", Villanova is a member of the Philadelphia Big Five, five Philadelphia college basketball teams who share a passionate rivalry.

The Wildcats have won the National Championship three times: 1985, 2016, and 2018. Their 1985 NCAA championship as an 8 seed still stands as the lowest seed ever to win the title. The game is referred to as "The Perfect Game" as they shot a record 78.6% as a team for the game (22 for 28, including 9 for 10 in the second half). Their 2016 NCAA Championship, is referred to as "The Perfect Ending" and is the only NCAA Men's Championship game to be won on a buzzer beater, as Kris Jenkins drained a shot as time expired. They made the Final Four in 1939, 1971, 1985, 2009, 2016, and 2018; their six Final Four appearances are 13th most all-time. As of 2019, they have an NCAA Tournament record of 65–37 (.637). Villanova has defeated six No. 1 seeds in the NCAA tournament (Michigan and Georgetown in 1985, Pittsburgh in 2009, Kansas and North Carolina in 2016, and Kansas in 2018), which is sixth most all-time. The Villanova Wildcats have appeared in the NCAA Tournament 39 times, the eighth highest total in NCAA history. They have won the Big East regular season championship eight times, most recently winning four straight from 2014 to 2017. They won the Big East Tournament in 1995, 2015, 2017, 2018, and 2019. Villanova entered the 2016–2017 season with an all-time winning percentage of (.648), placing the Wildcats tied for 13th among all NCAA Division I basketball programs. Through 2018, Villanova has 1,779 wins, which is 23rd among Division I men's basketball teams. Villanova has won the Philadelphia Big Five 26 times which is the second most of any team, including five straight from 2014 to 2018. The Wildcats have appeared in the National Invitation Tournament 17 times, winning in 1994.

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