Jake Stahl

Garland "Jake" Stahl (April 13, 1879 – September 18, 1922) was an American first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball with the Boston Red Sox, Washington Senators, and New York Highlanders. A graduate of the University of Illinois, he was a member of the Kappa Kappa chapter of Sigma Chi. He started off as a catcher before being traded to the Senators, where he moved to first base full-time, with occasional stints in the outfield. He was regarded as a good fielder and an average hitter, although he did lead all hitters in the American League in home runs with 10 in 1910. He also struck out 128 times that year, a record that would stand until 1938.

As a player-manager, he led the Senators to two seventh-place finishes, and in his second managerial stint led the Red Sox to the 1912 World Series title. His success was short-lived, as he had a falling-out with his teammates and resigned midway through the 1913 season. His successor, Bill Carrigan, would win two more World Series titles for the Sox. Stahl died of tuberculosis in Monrovia, California at age 43.[1]

Stahl has a measure of immortality as the acknowledged eponym of the term "jaking it", a baseball phrase for faking an injury to stay out of the lineup, or otherwise loafing.[2]

Stahl was not related to Red Sox teammate Chick Stahl, despite contemporary accounts erroneously listing them as brothers.

Jake Stahl
Jake Stahl 1913.jpeg
Stahl with the Boston Red Sox in 1913
First baseman / Manager
Born: April 13, 1879
Elkhart, Illinois
Died: October 18, 1922 (aged 43)
Monrovia, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 20, 1903, for the Boston Americans
Last MLB appearance
June 13, 1913, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Batting average.261
Home runs31
Runs batted in437
Stolen bases178
Managerial record263–270
Winning %.493
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

See also

Cy Young etc 1912
L to R: Cy Young, Stahl, Bill Carrigan and Michael T. McGreevy during spring training in 1912.

References

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/bullpen/Jake_Stahl
  2. ^ Dickson, Paul (1999). The New Dickson Baseball Dictionary (2nd ed.). Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ISBN 0-15-100380-7.

External links

Media related to Jake Stahl at Wikimedia Commons

1901 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1901 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1901 Western Conference football season. In its first season under head coach Edgar Holt, the team compiled an 8–2 record, finished in fourth place in the Western Conference, and outscored opponents by a total of 243 to 39.Tackle Justa Lindgren was the team captain. Two Illinois players received honors on the 1901 All-Western college football team:

Guard Jake Stahl - first-team honors from the Chicago American, Chicago Daily News, Chicago Record-Herald, and Chicago Tribune

Center Fred Lowenthal - first-team honors from the Chicago American, Chicago Tribune, and Walter Camp.

1902 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1902 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1902 Western Conference football season. In their second season under head coach Edgar Holt, the Illini compiled a 10–2–1 record and finished in fourth place in the Western Conference. Tackle Jake Stahl was the team captain.

1904 Washington Senators season

The 1904 Washington Senators won 38 games, lost 113, and finished in eighth place in the American League. They were managed by Malachi Kittridge and Patsy Donovan and played home games at National Park.

1905 Major League Baseball season

The 1905 Major League Baseball season, had the second modern World Series. The New York Giants defeated the Philadelphia Athletics to win the World Series.

1905 Washington Senators season

The 1905 Washington Senators won 64 games, lost 87, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Jake Stahl and played home games at National Park.

1906 Washington Senators season

The 1906 Washington Senators won 55 games, lost 95, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Jake Stahl and played home games at National Park.

1908 Boston Red Sox season

The 1908 Boston Red Sox season was the eighth season for the Major League Baseball franchise previously known as the Boston Americans. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1909 Boston Red Sox season

The 1909 Boston Red Sox season was the ninth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 88 wins and 63 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1910 Boston Red Sox season

The 1910 Boston Red Sox season was the tenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 81 wins and 72 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1910 Major League Baseball season

The 1910 Major League Baseball season.

1912 Boston Red Sox season

The 1912 Boston Red Sox season was the twelfth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. This was the first year that the team played its home games at Fenway Park. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 105 wins and 47 losses. The team set the franchise record for highest winning percentage (.691) in a season, which still stands; tied the franchise record for fewest losses in a season, originally set by the 1903 club and not since equalled; and set a franchise record for most wins, which was not surpassed until the 2018 club.The team then faced the National League (NL) champion New York Giants in the 1912 World Series, which the Red Sox won in eight games to capture the franchise's second World Series. One of the deciding plays in the World Series was a muffed fly ball by Giants outfielder Fred Snodgrass, which became known as the "$30,000 muff" in reference to the prize money for the winning team.Behind center fielder Tris Speaker and pitcher Smoky Joe Wood, the Red Sox led the league in runs scored and fewest runs allowed. Speaker was third in batting and was voted league Most Valuable Player. Wood won 34 games, including a record 16 in a row. Although the pitching staff was satisfactory, the only star pitcher was Wood, while the only star in the starting lineup was Speaker. Little-known third baseman Larry Gardner was the next best hitter, while future Hall of Famer Harry Hooper had a poor offensive season.

1913 Boston Red Sox season

The 1913 Boston Red Sox season was the thirteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 71 losses.

1920 Duquesne Dukes football team

The 1920 Duquesne Dukes football team represented Duquesne University during the 1920 college football season. The head coach was Jake Stahl, coaching his first season with the Dukes.

1921 Duquesne Dukes football team

The 1921 Duquesne Dukes football team represented Duquesne University during the 1921 college football season. The head coach was Jake Stahl, coaching his second season with the Dukes.

Buck O'Brien

Thomas Joseph "Buck" O'Brien (May 9, 1882 – July 25, 1959) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox.

O'Brien got a late start in professional baseball. However, as a spitballer, he did have tremendous success for a few years. In 1910, when he was 28 years old, he went 20–10 for Hartford of the Connecticut State League. In 1911, he was 26–7 for the Western League's Denver Grizzlies, leading the league in winning percentage and strikeouts. The Grizzlies won 111 games en route to the league championship. In September of that year, O'Brien made his major league debut with the Red Sox and went 5–1 with a 0.38 earned run average.

The next season, he was in the starting rotation, including the first game ever played at Fenway Park on April 20, 1912. In 34 starts and 275 innings pitched, O'Brien won 20 games with a 2.58 ERA and 115 strikeouts; he finished in the top 10 in the American League in all five categories.

The Red Sox went 105–47 to win the AL pennant. O'Brien started Game 3 of the 1912 World Series against the New York Giants, but lost. Boston eventually took a 3–1 series lead, with ace pitcher Smokey Joe Wood slated to start Game 6. However, club owner Jimmy McAleer wanted the series to go back to Boston so he could get the gate receipts; he ordered manager Jake Stahl to start O'Brien instead of Wood. Buck, not knowing that he was going to pitch, was hungover the day of the game. He gave up three earned runs in the first inning, and Boston lost. Despite this, the Red Sox ended up defeating the Giants.

By the next season, hitters seemed to have O'Brien's spitball figured out. He went 4–9 before being sold to the White Sox, and just one year after winning 20 games, his major league career ended.

O'Brien died in Boston at age 77.

Hugh Bradley (baseball)

Hugh Bradley, born on May 23, 1885 in Grafton, Massachusetts, played first base in Major League Baseball from 1910 to 1915. On April 26, 1912 he hit the first ever home run at Fenway Park. As a backup first baseman for the 1912 World Series champion Boston Red Sox, Bradley got off to a hot start to the season and had a chance to supplant manager Jake Stahl as the regular at the position, but his hitting fell off dramatically as the season went on. Bradley died on January 26, 1949 in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Jake Stahl (American football)

Edward Adam "Jake" Stahl (January 16, 1891 – October 8, 1966) was an American football player and coach. He played guard and tackle positions for the Pittsburgh Panthers football teams from 1915 to 1918. He was selected as a second-team All-American in 1918. He also played professional football from 1920 to 1921. Stahl served as the had football coach at Duquesne University from 1920 to 1921, compiling a record of 3–7–2.

Larry Pape

Laurence Albert Pape (July 21, 1885 – July 21, 1918) was a pitcher in Major League who played his entire career for the Boston Red Sox between the 1909 and 1912 seasons. Listed at 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m), 175 lb., Pape batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Norwood, Ohio.

Pape began his baseball career with independent teams in a suburb of Cincinnati, before joining the Milwaukee Brewers of the American Association in 1908. He entered the majors in 1909 with the Red Sox, going 2–0 with a 2.01 ERA, appearing in 11 games as a starter, reliever and closer. He was demoted to Brockton a year later, being recalled in 1911 to join a Boston rotation that included Smoky Joe Wood, Ed Cicotte and Ray Collins. Pape responded with a 10–8 mark and a 2.45 ERA. He also was a member of the 1912 American League champion Red Sox, although he did not play in the World Series. The 1913 Reach Guide describes him as being used "mainly as a 'warm-up' pitcher" for the 1912 champions. Boston Globe reporter James O'Leary suggested that the reason he pitched so little in 1912 was that manager Jake Stahl lost confidence in Pape after he made an error in the first game at Fenway Park on May 17 which caused the Red Sox to lose. Sportswriter Hugh Fullerton explained Pape's non-use in the 1912 World Series by writing that although he was a good, effective pitcher," Fullerton felt that the Red Sox opponents, the New York Giants, would be able to hit him. Despite not playing in the World Series, Pape was honored as a champion at the post-victory celebrations.In a three-season career, Pape posted a 13–9 record with 84 strikeouts and a 2.80 ERA in 51 appearances, including 24 starts, 13 complete games, two shutouts, one save, and 283⅓ innings of work.

After the 1912 season, Pape was sold to the Buffalo Bisons of the International League, after the Red Sox placed him on waivers, the Cincinnati Reds attempted to claim him, and the Red Sox pilled him off of waivers. Sportswriter Joe S. Jackson wrote an article in the Washington Post about the injustice of the situation, as Pape would have earned more if he went to the Reds. Pape never played for the Bisons, and quit baseball when the Bisons were going to send him to a Canadian team. He did not pitch at all in 1913, and was sold to the Portland Beavers after the season for $2000. He pitched ineffectively in nine games for the Beavers and was released during the season.Pape died on his 33rd birthday in Swissvale, Pennsylvania. His death was reported as being due to complications from an old baseball injury in which he was hit by a ball in the stomach. However, the cause of death listed on his death certificate was glandular cancer.

Stahl

Stahl (German: steel) is a surname of German origin, which also occurs among Jews and Hutterites. It may refer to:

Agustín Stahl (1842–1917), Puerto Rican physician, ethnologist, and botanist

Alexander von Stahl (born 1938), German lawyer, politician and civil servant

Armin Mueller-Stahl (born 1930), German actor, painter, writer and musician

Ben Stahl (1915–1998), American political activist

Ben Stahl (1910–1987), American artist, illustrator and author

Chick Stahl (1873–1907), American baseball outfielder

Christian Ernst Stahl (1848–1919), German botanist

Daniel Stahl (born 1971), American game designer

Daniel Ståhl (born 1992), Swedish discus thrower

Floyd Stahl (1899–1996), American collegiate athletics coach

Franklin Stahl (born 1929), American molecular biologist and geneticist

Franz Stahl (born 1962), American guitarist

Fredrika Stahl (born 1984), Swedish singer and songwriter

Friedrich Julius Stahl (1802–1861), German constitutional lawyer, political philosopher and politician

Georg Ernst Stahl (1660–1734), German chemist

Gerry Stahl (born 1945), American computer scientist, son of Ben Stahl

Heinrich Stahl (1600–1657), Baltic German pastor

Henri Joseph Stahl (1877–1942), Romanian stenographer, graphologist, historian and fiction writer

Henri H. Stahl (1901–1991), Romanian Marxist cultural anthropologist and social historian

Henriette Yvonne Stahl (1900–1984), Romanian novelist and short story writer

Jake Stahl (1879–1922), American baseball player and manager

Jean-Baptist Stahl (1869–1932), porcelain artist, creator and designer of Phanolith

Jerry Stahl (born 1953), American novelist and screenwriter

John M. Stahl (1896–1950), American film director and producer

Lesley Stahl (born 1941), American television journalist

Linda Stahl (born 1985), German javelin thrower

Lisa Stahl (born 1965), American model, actress and game show host

Lydia Stahl (1885-?), Soviet spy

Nick Stahl, (born 1979) American actor

Norman H. Stahl (born 1931), judge of the United States Court of Appeals

Peter Stahl, American vocalist

Richard Stahl (1932–2006), American actor

Rose Stahl (1868–1955), American actress

Samuel M. Stahl (born 1939), American Rabbi and writer

Sebastian Stahl (born 1978), German racing driver

Stephanie Stahl, Editor-in-Chief of InformationWeek magazine

Stephanie Stahl (reporter), medical reporter for KYW-TV

Idan Stahl (born 1986) Israeli army officer.

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