Jake Gibbs

Jerry Dean "Jake" Gibbs (born November 7, 1938) is a former Major League Baseball player who played for the New York Yankees as a platoon catcher from 1962 to 1971. Although Gibbs was the regular starting catcher for NY in 1967 and '68, he was primarily a back-up for Elston Howard and then Thurman Munson at the tail-end of his career.

Prior to beginning his professional baseball career, Gibbs had successful careers in college baseball and college football at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) for the Ole Miss Rebels. He was also a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha (PIKE) Fraternity. He returned to Ole Miss to coach the baseball and football teams.

Jake Gibbs
Catcher
Born: November 7, 1938 (age 80)
Grenada, Mississippi
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 11, 1962, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1971, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Batting average.233
Home runs25
Runs batted in146
Teams

Amateur career

Gibbs attended the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). He played quarterback for the Ole Miss Rebels football team, and also played for the Ole Miss Rebels baseball team. Both teams compete in the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

Gibbs led the Rebels to their first SEC baseball championship in 1959.[1]

During his junior football season, Gibbs was best remembered for punting the ball to Louisiana State University All-American Billy Cannon in a Halloween Night game at Tiger Stadium. On a third-and-19 with 10 minutes remaining, and the No. 3 Rebels ahead of defending national champion and No. 1 LSU 3-0. Cannon picked up the ball on one bounce at his own 11-yard line and raced past the Rebel coverage unit, including Gibbs, 89 yards to the game's only touchdown. The play helped Cannon win the 1959 Heisman Memorial Trophy.

The 7-3 loss cost Ole Miss a chance at the wire service national championships, since those polls were voted upon at the time prior to bowl games and did not take into account Ole Miss' 21-0 humiliation of LSU in the 1960 Sugar Bowl, 62 days after the teams played in Baton Rouge.

During his senior year at Mississippi, Gibbs led the Ole Miss Rebels football team to a 10–0–1 record, with the lone blemish a 6-6 deadlock against an inferior LSU squad (the Tigers went 5-4-1 after winning 20 of 22 games in 1958 and 1959) at Oxford, Mississippi. The Rebels won the 1961 Sugar Bowl, defeating the Rice Owls football team 14-6, as Gibbs scored both touchdowns.[2][3] The Rebels were recognized as national champions by the Football Writers Association of America. Gibbs was named to the 1960 College Football All-America Team.[4] That year, he was also named SEC Player of the Year.[5]

Professional career

Gibbs decided instead to go professional in baseball despite being drafted by the Houston Oilers of the American Football League and Cleveland Browns of the National Football League in 1961. Gibbs signed with the New York Yankees in 1961, receiving a $100,000 signing bonus under the Bonus Rule.[6][7] Gibbs signed as a third baseman and shortstop.[6]

He began his professional career with the Richmond Virginians of the International League; he recorded five hits in a double header in his professional debut[8] and started his career with an eight-game hitting streak.[9] The Yankees optioned him to Richmond in 1962,[10] but his season was limited by injuries.[11] The Yankees asked Gibbs to switch to catcher in 1963.[12][13] Gibbs spent the 1963 season with the Virginians, before the Yankees promoted him again in September.[14]

Gibbs spent his four first professional seasons in minor league baseball,[15] where his highest season batting average was .284 and he managed to hit 28 home runs across the four seasons.[4] With Yogi Berra's retirement before the 1964 season, Gibbs competed for a spot on the Yankees' roster.[16] He was unable to appear in the 1964 World Series due to broken fingers.[17] He also missed the end of the 1966 season after suffering a broken left hand.[18] Gibbs backed up Elston Howard for a number of years.[19] When the Yankees traded Howard during the 1967 season, Gibbs became the team's starting catcher.[20] He eventually lost the first-string job to Thurman Munson, but continued as a back-up with the team.[21] In June 1971, he announced his retirement from baseball, effective at the end of the season.[22] He played his final game on September 29, 1971.

Coaching career

Gibbs returned to Ole Miss as an assistant football coach in 1965, working during the Yankees' offseason.[15][22] In this role, Gibbs mentored Heisman Trophy finalist quarterback Archie Manning.[21]

After the 1971 season, Gibbs returned to Ole Miss full-time as a baseball coach and football recruiter.[22] In 1972, he coached Ole Miss to the SEC championship. The team set an SEC record for consecutive conference wins, and went to Omaha for the 1972 College World Series (CWS),[1] and Gibbs was named coach of the year.[23] Gibbs was named coach of the year again in 1977.[24] Gibbs retired in 1990 with 485 wins, more than any coach in Ole Miss history, though this was later surpassed on March 9, 2013, by Mike Bianco.[1]

Gibbs returned to the Yankees' organization in 1993 as the team's bullpen catcher.[25] In 1994 and 1995, Gibbs managed the Tampa Yankees, the Yankees' Class A-Advanced affiliate in the Florida State League.[26][27]

Honors

In 1995, Gibbs was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.[28] He has appeared in 2012 at the Yankees' Old-Timers' Day.[29]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Gibbs, Kessinger will return to manage at Ole Miss - The Dispatch". Cdispatch.com. February 4, 2011. Retrieved July 3, 2012.
  2. ^ "Best sports moment in each of the 50 states - Sports Fans, Teams, Stadiums, Page 2 - Fandom Blog - ESPN Playbook - ESPN". Espn.go.com. February 7, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  3. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "The Windsor Star - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  5. ^ "The Altus Times-Democrat - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  6. ^ a b "The Evening Independent - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  7. ^ "Gettysburg Times - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  8. ^ "The Miami News - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  9. ^ "The Miami News - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  10. ^ "Youngstown Vindicator - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  11. ^ "Proquest - Courant.com". Pqasb.pqarchiver.com. May 10, 1962. Retrieved July 3, 2012. (subscription required)
  12. ^ "The Palm Beach Post - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  13. ^ "The Miami News - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  14. ^ "Youngstown Vindicator - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  15. ^ a b "The Miami News - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  16. ^ "The Southeast Missourian - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  17. ^ "The Spokesman-Review - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  18. ^ "Los Angeles Times: Archives - YANKS' GIBBS OUT FOR YEAR". Pqasb.pqarchiver.com. August 27, 1966. Retrieved July 3, 2012. (subscription required)
  19. ^ "Schenectady Gazette - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  20. ^ "The Evening Independent - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  21. ^ a b "The Day - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  22. ^ a b c "The Palm Beach Post - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  23. ^ "Herald-Journal - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  24. ^ "Jake Gibbs named top coach in South". Pqasb.pqarchiver.com. June 8, 1977. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  25. ^ "Record-Journal - Google News Archive Search". Retrieved April 24, 2017.
  26. ^ Curry, Jack (October 14, 2004). "As Prospects, Rivera and Jeter Shared Talent and Big Dreams". The New York Times.
  27. ^ "Yankees' Jeter wins MVP honor Series%3A FSL%3B BASEBALL%3B Correction". Pqasb.pqarchiver.com. August 26, 1994. Retrieved July 3, 2012. (subscription required)
  28. ^ "GIBBS ENTERS COLLEGE SHRINE HALL OF FAME". Sun Herald. December 13, 1995. p. D2. Retrieved July 3, 2012. (subscription required)
  29. ^ "Yankees to hold 66th Old-Timers' Day on Sunday, July 1 | yankees.com: News". Newyork.yankees.mlb.com. June 25, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012.

External links

1959 All-SEC football team

The 1959 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1959 college football season. Billy Cannon won the Heisman.

1960 All-SEC football team

The 1960 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1960 college football season.

1960 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1960 College Football All-America Team

The 1960 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1960. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1960 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) the Sporting News, and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

Seven players, including 1960 Heisman Trophy winner Joe Bellino of Navy, and College and Pro Football Hall of Fame inductees Mike Ditka of Pitt and Bob Lilly of TCU, were unanimously named first-team All-Americans by all six official selectors.

1960 Ole Miss Rebels football team

The 1960 Ole Miss Rebels football team represented the University of Mississippi during the 1960 college football season. The Rebels were named national champions by the Football Writers Association of America, but not the AP, UPI or NCF who are the other major selectors recognized by the NCAA. While Ole Miss claims a share of two other national titles (both retroactive picks), this is the only one recognized by the NCAA and the college football community at large.Minnesota was crowned as national champion by both major polls before the bowl games; the major media polls would not wait until after the bowls to crown a national champion until 1963. The Rebels were the only major-conference team in the nation that finished the season undefeated on the field (Missouri subsequently was credited with an undefeated season when its one loss was erased by forfeit).

1960 Sugar Bowl

The 1960 Sugar Bowl to the featured the second-ranked Ole Miss Rebels, and the third ranked LSU Tigers. LSU was the defending national champion, playing in its home state, but faced a rematch of a tough 7-3 win in a regular season game.

After a scoreless first quarter of play, Ole Miss scored on a 43-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Jake Gibbs to Cowboy Woodruff, as the Rebels took a 7–0 lead. In the third quarter, Bobby Franklin of Ole Miss threw an 18-yard touchdown pass to Larry Grantham as Ole Miss led 14–0. In the fourth quarter, Franklin threw a 9-yard touchdown pass to George Blair as Ole Miss led 21–0. They held on to win the game.

The story of the game was Ole Miss's relentless defense, that may have been one of the best in any bowl game's history. It held LSU to just 74 yards of total offense, including –15 rushing yards, and never let LSU inside the Ole Miss 38-yard line during the game. Bobby Franklin was named the game's MVP.

1961 Sugar Bowl

The 1961 edition of the Sugar Bowl featured the 2nd-ranked Ole Miss Rebels and the unranked Rice Owls. After winning the game, Ole Miss won the national championship.

In the first quarter, Rebels quarterback Jake Gibbs scored on an 8-yard touchdown run. In the third quarter, Rice scored on a 2-yard run by Blume, but the extra point missed and Rice was still trailing, 7–6. In the fourth quarter, Ole Miss put the game away with a 3-yard touchdown run from Gibbs as Ole Miss won, 14–6. Rice won the statistical battle, but their quarterback threw 4 interceptions, and the team made some key mistakes.

Jake Gibbs was named the game's MVP.

1962 New York Yankees season

The 1962 New York Yankees season was the 60th season for the team in New York, and its 62nd season overall. The team finished with a record of 96–66, winning their 27th pennant, finishing 5 games ahead of the Minnesota Twins. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the San Francisco Giants in 7 games. It was their 20th World Championship in franchise history, and their last until 1977.

1963 New York Yankees season

The 1963 New York Yankees season was the 61st season for the team in New York, and its 63rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 104–57, winning their 28th pennant, finishing 10½ games ahead of the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Ralph Houk.

The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they were defeated by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 4 games, the first time the Yankees had ever been swept in the World Series (they had lost 4 games to none with one tied game in 1922).

1964 New York Yankees season

The 1964 New York Yankees season was the 62nd season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 99–63, winning their 29th pennant, finishing 1 game ahead of the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Yogi Berra. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they were defeated by the St. Louis Cardinals in 7 games. It would also be their last playoff appearance until 1976.

Yogi Berra, taking over as manager from Ralph Houk, who in turn moved up to general manager, had a difficult early season, with many veterans missing games due to injury. Doubts about his ability to manage his former teammates were brought into the open with the Harmonica Incident in late August, in which he clashed with utility infielder Phil Linz on the team bus following a sweep by the Chicago White Sox that appeared to have removed the Yankees from pennant contention. The team rallied behind Berra afterwards, and won the pennant. However the incident may have convinced the team's executives to replace Berra with Johnny Keane, manager of the victorious Cardinals, after the season.

This season is considered to be the endpoint of the "Old Yankees" dynasty that had begun with the Ruppert–Huston partnership and then continued with the Topping–Webb partnership. The Yankees would soon undergo ownership changes and front office turmoil, and would not be a serious factor in the pennant chase again until the mid 1970s. For television viewers and radio listeners, the sudden removal of Mel Allen following that season marked the end of an era of Yankees television and radio broadcasts.

1966 New York Yankees season

The 1966 New York Yankees season was the 64th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 70–89, finishing 26.5 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Johnny Keane and Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Keane managed his final MLB game in early-May, and died the following January at the age of 55.

The Yankees finished in 10th place, although arguably a "strong" tenth. It was the first time they had finished in last place since 1912, their last year at the Hilltop.

On September 22, paid attendance of 413 was announced at the 65,000-seat Yankee Stadium. WPIX announcer Red Barber asked the TV cameras to pan the empty stands as he commented on the low attendance. Although denied the camera shots on orders from the Yankees' head of media relations, he said, "I don't know what the paid attendance is today, but whatever it is, it is the smallest crowd in the history of Yankee Stadium, and this crowd is the story, not the game." By a horrible stroke of luck, that game was the first for CBS executive Mike Burke as team president. A week later, Barber was invited to breakfast where Burke told him that his contract wouldn't be renewed.

1968 New York Yankees season

The 1968 New York Yankees season was the 66th season for the team in New York, and its 68th season overall. The team finished above .500 for the first time since 1964, with a record of 83–79, finishing 20 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. The 1968 season was notable for being Mickey Mantle's final season before he announced his retirement the following spring. The Yankees batted .214 as a team, the lowest total ever for the live-ball era (as of 2017).

1969 New York Yankees season

The 1969 New York Yankees season was the 67th season for the team in New York, and its 69th season overall. The team finished in fifth-place in the newly established American League East with a record of 80–81, 28½ games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1970 New York Yankees season

The 1970 New York Yankees season was the 68th season for the franchise in New York, and its 70th season overall. The team finished in second place in the American League East with a record of 93–69, 15 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. The 93 wins were the most for the Yankees since 1964. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

Yankees had the lowest payroll in MLB from 1943 till 1993

1977 Southeastern Conference Baseball Tournament

The 1977 Southeastern Conference Baseball Tournament was held at Swayze Field in Oxford, MS from May 13th through May 16th. Ole Miss won the tournament and earned the Southeastern Conference's automatic bid to the 1977 NCAA Tournament.

The 1977 tournament was the first baseball tournament held by the SEC. It has been held every year since.

Billy Cannon's Halloween run

During a college football game on Halloween night in 1959, Billy Cannon of Louisiana State University (LSU) returned a punt 89 yards for a touchdown against the Ole Miss Rebels. The return occurred late in the fourth quarter and provided the only touchdown scored in the game, as the Tigers won 7–3. Featuring several broken tackles, it was a signature play of Cannon's Heisman Trophy-winning season and a notable moment in the LSU–Ole Miss football rivalry.

Frank Fernández (baseball)

Frank Fernández (born April 16, 1943) is an American former professional baseball catcher. He signed as an amateur free agent with the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB) upon graduation from Curtis High School in Staten Island in 1961. He spent six seasons in their minor league system before debuting with the Yankees as a September call-up in 1967. He went one for three in his major league debut against the California Angels in the second game of a doubleheader on September 12.Fernández backed up Jake Gibbs for 1968 and 1969. Upon former first round draft pick Thurman Munson's arrival in the major leagues, the Yankees dealt Fernández to the Oakland Athletics with Al Downing for Danny Cater and Ossie Chavarria prior to the start of the 1970 season.

During the 1971 season, the A's traded Fernández to the Washington Senators with Paul Lindblad and Don Mincher for Mike Epstein and Darold Knowles. A little over a month later, he was purchased back by the A's, only to be dealt away again during the 1971 season—this time to the Chicago Cubs for Adrian Garrett.

Fernández made three pinch hitting appearances with the Cubs in 1972, but spent most of his time with their triple A affiliate, the Wichita Aeros before being reacquired by the Yankees in a minor league deal. He also spent time in Oakland's and the Detroit Tigers' farm system before retiring.

Fernández holds the record for the most home runs (39) for a player with a batting average less than .200, as well as having the most career walks than hits by a non-pitcher with over 100 at-bats, with 164 walks and 145 hits.

Ole Miss Rebels baseball

The Ole Miss Rebels baseball team represents the University of Mississippi in NCAA Division I college baseball. The team participates in the West Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They are currently coached by head coach Mike Bianco and assistant coaches Mike Clement, Carl Lafferty, and Marc MacMillan. They play home games at Swayze Field. Ole Miss has played in the College World Series five times, most recently in 2014.

Southeastern Conference Baseball Coach of the Year

The Southeastern Conference Baseball Coach of the Year is an award given to the most outstanding baseball head coach in the Southeastern Conference, as chosen by Southeastern Conference Coaches.

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