Jake Beckley

Jacob Peter Beckley (August 4, 1867 – June 25, 1918), nicknamed "Eagle Eye", was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball. He played for several major league teams between 1888 and 1907. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

Jake Beckley
MLB-Jake Beckley
First baseman
Born: August 4, 1867
Hannibal, Missouri
Died: June 25, 1918 (aged 50)
Kansas City, Missouri
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 20, 1888, for the Pittsburgh Alleghenys
Last MLB appearance
June 15, 1907, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.309
Hits2,930
Home runs87
Runs batted in1,578
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1971
Election MethodVeterans Committee

Early life

Beckley was born in Hannibal, Missouri.[1] He was the son of Bernhart and Rosina (Neth) Beckley. Beckley began playing semi-professional baseball while still a teenager. A former Hannibal teammate, Bob Hart, suggested the 18-year-old Beckley to the Leavenworth Oilers (Leavenworth, Kansas) of the Western Association.[2] After splitting two seasons between Leavenworth and a team in Lincoln, Nebraska, Beckley's contract was sold to the St. Louis Whites in the Western Association before he was purchased (along with Harry Staley) by the Pittsburgh Alleghenys for $4,500 midway through the 1888 season.[3]

Major league career

After playing one and a half seasons for the Alleghenys, Beckley and eight of his teammates jumped to the Pittsburgh Burghers,[3] a team in the newly-formed Players' League (PL). Manager Ned Hanlon crossed over, as well. Beckley stated he was willing to go to the PL because "I'm only in this game for the money anyway."[2] The league lasted only one season, and Beckley spent the next five and a half seasons with the Pittsburgh Pirates.[3]

On July 25, 1896, Beckley was traded to the New York Giants for Harry Davis and $1,000.[3] Beckley was released by the Giants the following season on May 22, and signed as a free agent with the Cincinnati Reds five days later.[3] In his first season with the Reds, Beckley was unsuccessful in getting rookie Honus Wagner out with the hidden ball trick, a tactic he had been known to use against the opposition. But later when Wagner's Louisville Colonels came to play at Cincinnati, Beckley was successful in getting Wagner out, employing a strategy that involved the use of two baseballs.[4] Against the St. Louis Cardinals, Beckley belted three home runs in the same game on September 26, 1897, a feat not again matched until 1922 by Ken Williams.[2] He played with Cincinnati for seven seasons and was later purchased by the Cardinals on February 11, 1904.[3]

Beckley retired after the 1907 season with 2,930 career hits, second only to Cap Anson.[5] He continues to rank fourth all-time among major leaguers in triples with 244. As of the 2014 season, Beckley holds the all-time best batting average among Pirates first basemen (.300).[6] Beckley holds the MLB record for career putouts, with 23,743,[7] and ranks second all-time in games played at first base, with 2,376.[7]

Later life

Jake Beckley plaque
Beckley's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame

After his MLB career ended, Beckley became a player/manager for Kansas City in the American Association in 1908–1909, Bartlesville in the Western Association in 1910, and Hannibal in the Central Association in 1911. He served as an umpire in the Federal League in 1913 and also served as a baseball coach at William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri. In addition to his umpiring and coaching after retirement from professional play, Beckley operated a grain business in Kansas City.

Beckley married Molly Murphy of Hannibal in 1891,[2] but she died of tuberculosis seven months after their wedding. He later remarried after his playing career concluded.[8] Beckley died of heart disease[9] in Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 50.[1] He was interred at the Riverside Cemetery in Hannibal.[1]

Honors

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Jake Beckley Stats". Baseball-Almanac.com. Retrieved 2006-11-21.
  2. ^ a b c d Fleitz, David (2003). "The Baseball Biography Project – Jake Beckley". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved 23 July 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Jake Beckley". Retrosheet.org. Retrieved 2006-11-21.
  4. ^ Smith, Ira L. (1956). "Baseball's Famous First Basemen". Baseball Digest. New York: A.S. Barnes & Co. Retrieved 23 July 2012.
  5. ^ "Jake Beckley". Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved 24 July 2012.
  6. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Statistics at MLB.com". MLB.com. Retrieved 22 July 2012.
  7. ^ a b "Jake Beckley". BaseballHallOfFame.com. Archived from the original on 2007-08-20. Retrieved 2008-09-08.
  8. ^ "Beckley enters Reds HOF for good reasons". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved December 23, 2014.
  9. ^ "Jake Beckley". TheDeadballEra.com. Archived from the original on 2006-12-16. Retrieved 2006-11-21.
  10. ^ "Pirates Hall of Fame". Pittsburgh.Pirates.MLB.com. Retrieved 22 July 2012.
  11. ^ "Reds Hall of Fame Announces Class of 2014". Cincinnati.Reds.MLB.com. Retrieved 4 December 2013.
  12. ^ http://www.prospectleague.com/view/prospectleague/prospect-league-news/news_404622

External links

1892 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1892 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 11th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 6th in the National League. The Pirates finished sixth in the league standings with a record of 80–73.

1900 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1900 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished seventh in the National League with a record of 62–77, 21.5 games behind the Brooklyn Superbas.

1901 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1901 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in last place in the eight-team National League with a record of 52 wins and 87 losses, 38 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1902 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1902 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 70–70, 33.5 games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1903 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1903 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 74–65, 16½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1904 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1904 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 23rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 13th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 75–79 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1905 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1905 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 24th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 14th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 58–96 during the season and finished sixth in the National League.

1906 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1906 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 25th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 15th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 52–98 during the season and finished 7th in the National League.

1971 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1971 featured a new committee on the Negro Leagues that met in February and selected Satchel Paige. The museum planned to honor Paige and those who would follow in a special permanent exhibit outside the Hall of Fame but controversy about the nature of the honor began at the event announcing his election, February 9, and continued until the induction ceremonies six months later. At the latter event Paige was inducted to the Hall of Fame itself, the same as the major league figures.

Otherwise the elections continued a system of annual elections in place since 1968.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected no one.

The Veterans Committee met in closed-door sessions to select from executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

It elected seven, the biggest year in its 1953 to 2001 history: Dave Bancroft, Jake Beckley, Chick Hafey, Harry Hooper, Joe Kelley, Rube Marquard, and George Weiss.

Bartlesville Boosters

The Bartlesville Boosters were a minor league baseball team that existed on-and-off from 1907 to 1924. The team, based in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, USA, played in the Oklahoma–Arkansas–Kansas League (1907), Oklahoma–Kansas League (1908) and Western Association (1909–1910, 1924).

Major leaguers Larry Cheney and Art Thomason played for the team in 1907. Cheney returned in 1908 and was joined by Ray Powell and manager Gus Alberts, both of whom also played in the big leagues. George Cochran, Bert Graham, Powell, Claude Thomas and John Vann played for them in 1909. Future Hall of Famer Jake Beckley joined the team as a player-manager in 1910, alongside Verne Clemons, Cochran, Thomas and Lon Ury.

Central Association

The Central Association was an American minor league baseball league. It began operations in 1908, and ran continuously through 1917. It was reorganized thirty years later, operating as a Class-C league from 1947-1949, with major league affiliates for most teams. Hall of Fame Inductees Burleigh Grimes and Jake Beckley are league alumni.

Leavenworth Soldiers

The Leavenworth Soldiers was the first professional baseball team from Leavenworth, Kansas. The club played in the Western League from 1886 to 1888. Their first year, they tied the Lincoln Tree Planters for last place at 31-49 despite the presence of Jake Beckley, who hit .341 and led the Western League with 113 hits while showing some pop. In 1887, the Soldiers were 27-27 when they disbanded on July 8 due to poor attendance. Beckley had another fine year, hitting .401 with 33 doubles between Leavenworth and Lincoln. In 1888, Leavenworth returned to the loop and went 7-7 under L. M. Cretors. They were in second place when the league stopped operations on June 21. A J. Curran was leading the club in batting average at .300.

List of Major League Baseball annual putouts leaders

The following is a list of annual leaders in putouts in Major League Baseball (MLB), with separate lists for the American League and the National League. The list also includes several professional leagues and associations that were never part of MLB.

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

Jake Beckley is the all-time leader in career putouts with 23,743. Jiggs Donahue holds the record for most putouts in a season with 1,846 in 1907. Frank McCormick, Steve Garvey, Bill Terry, and Ernie Banks have all led the league in putouts 5 times. Albert Pujols is the active leader in putouts and has led the league 4 times.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts as a first baseman leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a force-out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

First base, or 1B, is the first of four stations on a baseball diamond which must be touched in succession by a baserunner in order to score a run for that player's team. A first baseman is the player on the team playing defense who fields the area nearest first base, and is responsible for the majority of plays made at that base.

Jake Beckley is the all-time leader in career putouts as a first baseman with 23,731. Cap Anson (21,699), Ed Konetchy (21,361), Eddie Murray (21,255), and Charlie Grimm (20,711) are the only other players to record 20,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career putouts leaders

In baseball statistics, a putout (denoted by PO or fly out when appropriate) is given to a defensive player who records an out by a Tagging a runner with the ball when he is not touching a base (a tagout), catching a batted or thrown ball and tagging a base to put out a batter or runner (a Force out), catching a thrown ball and tagging a base to record an out on an appeal play, catching a third strike (a strikeout), catching a batted ball on the fly (a flyout), or being positioned closest to a runner called out for interference.

Jake Beckley is the all-time leader in career putouts with 23,743. Cap Anson (22,572), Ed Konetchy (21,378), Eddie Murray (21,265), Charlie Grimm (20,722), and Stuffy McInnis (20,120) are the only other players to record 20,000 career putouts.

List of Major League Baseball career triples leaders

In baseball, a triple is a hit in which the batter advances to third base in one play, with neither the benefit of a fielding error nor another runner being put out on a fielder's choice. Triples were more common in baseball's dead-ball era, when teams relied more on stolen bases and hit and run plays than on the home run. More distant fences in old ballparks, such as Pittsburgh's Forbes Field and Detroit's Tiger Stadium, also produced fewer home runs and more triples on well-hit balls. As a result, most of the players on this list have been retired for decades. In 2006, the Hardball Times lamented the decline of the 100-triple player, although three have joined the list since that time. Fangraphs, a statistical website, likewise noted the lack of modern 100-triple hitters in 2013. Of the 162 Major League Baseball players who have hit 100 or more triples, 69 are members of Baseball's Hall of Fame.Hall of Famer Sam Crawford of the Detroit Tigers holds the Major League Baseball triples record, with 309. Second to him is his Tigers teammate, Ty Cobb, with 297, the American League record. Honus Wagner is third with 252, the National League record. Jake Beckley (243), Roger Connor (233), Tris Speaker (222), Fred Clarke (220), and Dan Brouthers (205) are the only other players to have hit at least 200 triples. Only triples hit during the regular season are included in the totals (George Brett, Rafael Furcal, and Derek Jeter are tied for the record in post-season triples, with five).Jim O'Rourke was the first player to reach the 100-triple mark, doing so with the New York Giants in 1886. With Kenny Lofton's retirement after the 2007 season, 2008 was the first season since 1885 in which no active player had more than 100 triples. Carl Crawford hit his 100th triple in 2010, becoming the only active player on the list at that time. José Reyes became the latest player to reach the 100 triple plateau, doing so on April 8, 2012.

List of Major League Baseball triples records

There are various Major League Baseball records for triples.

Pittsburgh Burghers

The Pittsburgh Burghers were a baseball team in the Players' League, a short-lived Major League that existed only for the 1890 season. The team included a number of players who had jumped from the National League's Pittsburgh Alleghenys (now the Pittsburgh Pirates), including Hall of Famers Pud Galvin, Ned Hanlon, and Jake Beckley. Hanlon served as the team's manager. Meanwhile, John Tener, who would go on to represent Pittsburgh in the United States Congress and be elected the 25th Governor of Pennsylvania, finished his pitching career with the Burghers in 1890. Later Tener would become the president of the National League, and a director of the Philadelphia Phillies.

In its only season, the Burghers finished in 6th place with a 60-68 record. Hall Of Fame first baseman Jake Beckley was a powerhouse slugger for the Burghers. He hit .324 with 10 home runs and 120 RBIs. In addition, he led the PL by hitting 22 triples. But even Beckley's fine work could not overcome the weak hitting of the Pittsburgh team in general. The Burghers finished tied for the worst batting average in the loop with a .260 mark. The team played at the Alleghenies' former home, Exposition Park. The stadium and the team was located in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, which was not incorporated into the city of Pittsburgh until 1907. The area is currently known today as the North Side of Pittsburgh, and the site of Exposition Park was later used for Three Rivers Stadium.

In an indirect way, it can be argued that the Burghers, alone among the old Players' League franchises, still exist today. Nearly all of the Alleghenys' stars had jumped to the upstart league. The remains of the Alleghenys made a wretched showing, finishing with what is still the worst record in franchise history (and the second-worst in National League history). The resulting drain on attendance led Alleghenys owner Dennis McKnight to return his franchise to the National League. He then joined the Burghers' ownership group as a minority owner. This group repurchased the Pittsburgh National League franchise under a different corporate name, thus allowing them to legally regain title to most of the players who had bolted to the Players' League a year earlier. It is this franchise that forms the current ownership lineage of today's Pirates. In fact, the Pirates nickname can also be traced back to this Burgher episode. On reacquiring the National League franchise, the new owners scooped up Lou Bierbauer, a second baseman from the Brooklyn Ward's Wonders of the defunct Players' League, inadvertently left off the roster of the American Association's Philadelphia Athletics, who as his prior team claimed his rights. This led an AA official to denounce the Alleghenys' actions as "piratical"—an accusation that led the Alleghenys to rename themselves the Pirates for the next season.

Pittsburgh Burghers all-time roster

The Pittsburgh Burghers were a professional baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that played in the Players' League for one season in 1890. The franchise used Exposition Park as their home field. During their only season in existence, the team finished sixth in the PL with a record of 60-68.

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