Jackson, Alabama

Jackson is a city in Clarke County, Alabama, United States. The population was 5,228 at the 2010 census.[4] It was one of three wet settlements in an otherwise-dry county.[5]

Jackson, Alabama
Nickname(s): 
The Pine City
Location of Jackson in Clarke County, Alabama.
Location of Jackson in Clarke County, Alabama.
Coordinates: 31°31′18″N 87°53′28″W / 31.52167°N 87.89111°W
CountryUnited States
StateAlabama
CountyClarke
Area
 • Total15.83 sq mi (41.00 km2)
 • Land15.64 sq mi (40.50 km2)
 • Water0.19 sq mi (0.50 km2)
Elevation
236 ft (72 m)
Population
 • Total5,228
 • Estimate 
(2017)[2]
4,790
 • Density306.29/sq mi (118.26/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
36501, 36515, 36545
Area code(s)251
FIPS code01-38152
GNIS feature ID0151874
Websitecityofjacksonal.com
Battle of Burnt Corn
Map of Alabama during the War of 1812[3]

Geography

Jackson is located along the western border of Clarke County at coordinates 31°31′16″N 87°53′28″W / 31.521°N 87.891°W, on a rise overlooking east bank of the Tombigbee River. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.8 square miles (41.0 km2), of which 15.6 square miles (40.5 km2) is land and 0.19 square miles (0.5 km2), or 1.21%, is water.[4]

Jackson sits across the Tombigbee River from Washington County, Alabama.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19001,039
19101,37932.7%
19201,331−3.5%
19301,82837.3%
19402,03911.5%
19503,07250.7%
19604,95961.4%
19705,95720.1%
19806,0731.9%
19905,819−4.2%
20005,419−6.9%
20105,228−3.5%
Est. 20174,790[2]−8.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
2013 Estimate[7]

2010

As of the census[8] of 2010, there were 5,228 people, 2,112 households, and 1,446 families residing in the city. The population density was 334 people per square mile (129.1/km²). There were 2,426 housing units at an average density of 153.5 per square mile (59.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 54.9% White, 42.9% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 2,112 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.6% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 29.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city, the population was spread out with 25.1% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 23.6% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 17.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,917, and the median income for a family was $46,328. Males had a median income of $54,688 versus $29,483 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,822. About 21.9% of families and 29.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.4% of those under age 18 and 18.3% of those age 65 or over.

2000

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 5,419 people, 2,094 households, and 1,507 families residing in the city. The population density was 358.7 people per square mile (138.5/km²). There were 2,341 housing units at an average density of 155.0 per square mile (59.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 60.42% White, 38.49% African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.20% from other races, and 0.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.65% of the population.

There were 2,094 households out of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.5% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.0% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city, the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,806, and the median income for a family was $45,516. Males had a median income of $43,558 versus $21,125 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,346. About 15.3% of families and 21.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.9% of those under age 18 and 20.1% of those age 65 or over.

History

Jackson was founded in 1816 and is named after President Andrew Jackson. Former names for the city include Pine Level and Republicville.

During the Civil War, a Confederate fort was established on the banks of the Tombigbee River. It was named Fort Carney and was positioned on Carney's Bluff just south of Jackson. The cannon that was on the bluff now sits in front of City Hall.[10]

Jackson has four sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places. They are the Jackson Historic District, Clarke Mills, Doit W. McClellan Lustron House, and J. P. McKee Lustron House.[11]

During World War II, a prisoner-of-war camp was built and operated holding 253 captured German soldiers on Ocre Avenue.[12] The camp was opened April 6, 1945 and closed March 12, 1946.[13] Many of the prisoners were members of the Afrika Korps.[13]

Economy

The economy of Jackson is driven by the timber industry. Packaging Corporation of America has a paper mill that is the largest employer located in the city.[14]

Education

  • Alabama Southern Community College
  • Jackson Academy
  • Jackson Middle School
  • Jackson High School
  • Jackson Intermediate
  • Joe M. Gillmore Elementary
  • Walker Springs Road Baptist Academy

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "2017 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 7, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  3. ^ Lossing, Benson (1868). The Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812. Harper & Brothers, Publishers. p. 751.
  4. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Jackson city, Alabama". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  5. ^ "Wet Dry County Map". Alabama Alcoholic Beverage Control Board. Retrieved May 2, 2018.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Archived from the original on May 22, 2014. Retrieved June 3, 2014.
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2015-07-11.
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  10. ^ "Civil War Cannon in Jackson | Encyclopedia of Alabama". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved 2017-07-12.
  11. ^ National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  12. ^ "Welcome to Clarke County Pamphlet" (PDF). Clarke County Development Foundation. June 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-08. Retrieved 2007-04-25.
  13. ^ a b Clarke County Historical Marker, N31°31’53.6”W087°53’28.8”
  14. ^ "Clarke County, Alabama Industry".
  15. ^ "Ann Smith Bedsole". Alabama Academy of Honor. Alabama Department of Archives and History. Retrieved 18 April 2017.
  16. ^ "Antonio Chatman". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on October 17, 2012. Retrieved October 19, 2012.

External links

Coordinates: 31°31′18″N 87°53′28″W / 31.521685°N 87.891113°W

1972 United States elections

The 1972 United States elections was held on November 7, and elected the members of the 93rd United States Congress. The election took place during the later stages of the Vietnam War. The Republican Party won a landslide victory in the presidential election and picked up seats in the House, but the Democratic Party easily retained control of Congress. This was the first election after the ratification of the 26th Amendment granted the right to vote to those aged 18-20.Incumbent Republican President Richard Nixon won re-election, defeating Democratic Senator George McGovern from South Dakota. Nixon won a landslide victory, taking just under 61% of the popular vote and winning every state but Massachusetts and Washington, D.C.. Libertarian John Hospers won the electoral vote of one faithless elector, making him the most recent member of a third party to win an electoral vote. McGovern won the Democratic nomination after defeating Washington Senator Henry M. Jackson, Alabama Governor George Wallace, and New York Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm. This was the first presidential election after the McGovern–Fraser Commission (which McGovern himself had chaired) caused an increase in the number of states holding primary elections.In the House, the Republican Party picked up twelve seats, but Democrats easily retained a majority. In the Senate, the Democratic Party picked up two seats, increasing their majority. The House elections took place after the 1970 United States Census and the subsequent Congressional re-apportionment.

In the gubernatorial elections, Democrats won a net gain of one seat.

Andrew Jackson, Alabama

Andrew Jackson is an unincorporated community in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, United States, located on the west bank of the Tallapoosa River, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) east of Alexander City.

Ann Bedsole

Ann Smith Bedsole (born January 7, 1930), is a businesswoman, philanthropist, and a Republican politician from Mobile, Alabama. She is the first Republican woman to have been elected to the Alabama House of Representatives, in which she served from 1979 to 1983, and the first female ever elected to the Alabama State Senate, in which her tenure extended from 1983 to 1995.

Antonio Chatman

Antonio Tavaras Chatman (born February 12, 1979) is a former American football wide receiver and punt returner. He was signed by the San Francisco 49ers as an undrafted free agent in 2002. He played college football at Cincinnati.

Chatman also played for the Chicago Rush, Green Bay Packers and Cincinnati Bengals.

Clarke Mills

Clarke Mills or Vanity Fair Mills is a historic textile factory building in Jackson, Alabama. It was designed in the Moderne style by H.B. Bieberstein. The facility was completed in 1939 and was occupied by the Vanity Fair Corporation throughout much of its history. Clarke Mills was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 30, 1998.

Coastal Alabama Community College Monroeville

Coastal Alabama Community College Monroeville, formerly Alabama Southern Community College, is a community college system that operates in southwest Alabama, United States. Alabama Southern was formed in 1991 by the merger of Patrick Henry Junior College in Monroeville, Alabama and Hobson State Technical College in Thomasville, Alabama. The Thomasville campus is home to the Kathryn Tucker Windham Museum. In addition to two full service campuses located in these cities, learning centers are located in Gilbertown and Jackson, Alabama.

Doit W. McClellan Lustron House

The Doit W. McClellan Lustron House is a historic enameled steel prefabricated house in Jackson, Alabama. Designed and constructed by the Lustron Corporation, this example is one of two in Jackson. The other, the J. P. McKee Lustron House, is just around the corner from the McClellan Lustron.Lustron houses were only produced during a two-year period, with 2,495 known to have been made. Only roughly 2,000 of these are still in existence. Many of those that do remain have been altered significantly. Twenty Lustron houses are known to have been ordered in Alabama, although it is not clear if twenty were erected. Only eleven remained in 2000. Architectural historians with the Alabama Historical Commission believe that the two in Jackson may have been the first erected in the state.The house forms part of the National Register of Historic Places' Lustron Houses in Alabama MPS. It was placed on the National Register on February 24, 2000, due to its architectural significance.

Fort Jackson (Alabama)

Fort Toulouse and Fort Jackson are two forts that shared the same site at the fork of the Coosa River and the Tallapoosa River, near Wetumpka, Alabama.

Fort Toulouse was a stockade built by the French in 1717. It was replaced by a better-built fort of the same name in 1735, a bit further back from river erosion. Fort Toulouse served as a trading post with the Creek Indians until the end of the French & Indian War in 1763. With the French loss of that conflict, the French garrison spiked their cannons and left for both New Orleans and a return to France. The British victors chose not to occupy the Fort, and it eventually collapsed into decay.

In the midst of the War of 1812, an 1813 civil war in the Creek Nation led to an invasion by Americans from Tennessee, Georgia, and Mississippi Territory. In the ensuing Creek War of 1813-1814, General Andrew Jackson commanded the combined American forces of Tennessee militia, U.S. regulars, and Cherokee and Creek Indian allies. Jackson defeated the Red Stick Creeks at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814, and afterwards initiated construction of a fort atop the site of the old French fort at the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa rivers. The fort was intentionally built near the sacred Creek site known as the Hickory Ground. Jackson then temporarily traveled to Washington and in his absence, the fort was named "Jackson" in his honor. After Jackson's return, he imposed the Treaty of Fort Jackson upon both the Northern Creek enemies and the Southern Creek allies, wresting 20,000,000 acres (8,100,000 ha) from all Creeks for white settlement.

The site was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960.During the American Bicentennial in the mid-1970s an attempt was made to reconstruct Fort Toulouse, however the replica was incorrectly built upon the outline of the much larger Fort Jackson.

Harold Jackson (American journalist)

Harold Jackson is an American journalist who won a Pulitzer Prize. In 2010, he was editor of the editorial page of The Philadelphia Inquirer. He was formerly an editorial writer at The Baltimore Sun and The Birmingham News (Alabama).

J. P. McKee Lustron House

The J. P. McKee Lustron House is a historic enameled steel prefabricated house in Jackson, Alabama. Designed and constructed by the Lustron Corporation, this example is one of two in Jackson. The other, the Doit W. McClellan Lustron House, is just around the corner from the McKee Lustron.Lustron houses were only produced during a two-year period, with 2,495 known to have been made. Only roughly 2,000 of these are still in existence. Many of those that do remain have been altered significantly. Twenty Lustron houses are known to have been ordered in Alabama, although it is not clear if twenty were erected. Only eleven remained in 2000. Architectural historians with the Alabama Historical Commission believe that the two in Jackson may have been the first erected in the state.The house forms part of the National Register of Historic Places' Lustron Houses in Alabama MPS. It was placed on the National Register on February 24, 2000, due to its architectural significance.

Jackson County, Alabama

Jackson County is the northeasternmost county in the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 53,227. The county seat is Scottsboro. The county was named for Andrew Jackson, general in the United States Army and afterward President of the United States of America. Jackson County is a prohibition or dry county, but three cities within the county (Bridgeport, Scottsboro, and Stevenson) are "wet", allowing alcohol sales.

Jackson County comprises the Scottsboro, AL Micropolitan Statistical Area. This is included in the Chattanooga-Cleveland-Dalton, TN-GA-AL Combined Statistical Area. It is the site of Russell Cave National Monument, an archeological site with evidence of 8,000 years of human occupation in the Southeast.

Jackson Historic District (Jackson, Alabama)

The Jackson Historic District is a historic district in the city of Jackson, Alabama. Jackson was founded in 1816 and is the oldest incorporated settlement in Clarke County. The historic district features examples of Greek Revival, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, and regional vernacular architecture. Spread over 180 acres (73 ha) with 140 contributing buildings, it is roughly bounded by College Avenue, Forest Avenue, Carroll Avenue, Cedar Street, Florida Street, Commerce Street, Clinton Street, and Spruce Street. It is a part of the Clarke County Multiple Property Submission and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on January 23, 1998.

Jimmy Outlaw

James Paulus Outlaw (January 20, 1913 – April 9, 2006) was an American professional baseball player. He played all or part of 10 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) as an outfielder and third baseman for the Cincinnati Reds, Boston Bees, and Detroit Tigers.

Outlaw played college baseball for the Auburn Tigers and was signed in 1934 by the Cincinnati Reds. He played three years in the minor leagues, batting .351 for the Decatur Commodores, leading the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League in hits in 1935, and batting .330 as an All-Star third baseman for the Nashville Volunteers in 1936.

He made his major league debut with the Cincinnati Reds in 1937, appearing in 49 games before returning to the minor leagues.

He next played with the Syracuse Chiefs of the International League in 1937 and 1938, compiling a .339 batting average in 1938. He returned to the major leagues in 1939 with the Boston Bees, but he ended up in the International League again from 1940 to 1943, playing for the Buffalo Bisons.

In August 1943, Outlaw was acquired by the Detroit Tigers, with whom he played as an outfielder and third baseman until May 1949. He was a starter in the outfield for the Tigers in his first full major league season in 1944, appearing in 132 games. In 1945, he began the season as the Tigers' starting left fielder but moved to third base to make room for Hank Greenberg upon his return from military service in June 1945. He played third base in all seven games of the Tigers' 1945 World Series championship against the Chicago Cubs.

In 10 major league seasons, Outlaw compiled a .268 batting average with 184 RBIs, 257 runs, 79 doubles, 17 triples, 24 stolen bases, and a .333 on-base percentage. Outlaw made his home in Jackson, Alabama, where he died in 2006 at age 93. He was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.

John "Jabo" Starks

John Henry "Jabo" Starks (October 26, 1937 – May 1, 2018) was an American funk and blues drummer best known for playing with James Brown as well as other notable musicians including Bobby Bland and B.B. King. A self-taught musician, he was known for his effective and clean drum patterns. He was one of the originators of funk drumming and one of the most sampled drummers.

Samaje Perine

Samaje Perine (born September 16, 1995) is an American football running back for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Oklahoma, and was drafted by the Redskins in the fourth round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

Scouting in Alabama

Scouting in Alabama has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live.

Stew Bolen

Stewart O'Neal Bolen (October 13, 1902 – August 30, 1969) was an American professional baseball pitcher who played four seasons in Major League Baseball, in 1926 and 1927 with the St. Louis Browns and the Philadelphia Phillies in 1931 and 1932.

Thomas Jackson (Alabama politician)

Thomas E. Jackson Jr. (born August 24, 1949) is an American politician. He is a member of the Alabama House of Representatives from the 68th District, serving since 1994. He is a member of the Democratic party.

Travis and Bob

Travis and Bob were an American rock and roll duo from Jackson, Alabama. Its members were Travis Pritchett (born on 18 March 1939 in Jackson; died October 18th, 2010 in Mobile) and Bob Weaver (born on 27 July 1939 in Jackson).In 1959, they released a single on the independent label Sandy Records called "Tell Him No", which was written by Pritchett. Dot Records picked up the single for nationwide distribution, and it became a hit, reaching #21 on the Billboard R&B charts and #8 on the Billboard Hot 100. Despite recording further singles for Big Top Records and Mercury Records, the duo never had another hit single.

In June 1960, the duo filed a lawsuit against Sandy founders Johnny Bozeman and Paul DuBose. Travis and Bob claimed they did not receive royalties from airplay and sales of their recordings.Travis Wilbon Pritchett died on October 18, 2010 at a Mobile hospital. He was a recording artist in the Country Music Hall of Fame with "Tell Him No". He was survived by two sons, a daughter, his sister, 12 grandchildren, and 5 great-grandchildren.

Municipalities and communities of Clarke County, Alabama, United States
Cities
Towns
CDPs
Unincorporated
communities
Ghost towns

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