Jack Weisenburger

John Edward "Jack" Weisenburger (born August 2, 1926) is a former American football and baseball player. He played college football for the University of Michigan from 1944 to 1947 and was the starting fullback for the undefeated 1947 Michigan Wolverines football team that became known as the "Mad Magicians" and has been rated as the greatest football team in Michigan history. He later played professional baseball for five years from 1948 to 1952.

Jack Weisenburger
Jack Weisenburger (MHHS)
Weisenburger from 1944 Muskegon Heights H.S. yearbook
Biographical details
BornAugust 2, 1926 (age 92)
Muskegon County, Michigan
Playing career
1944–1947Michigan
Position(s)Halfback, Fullback, Quarterback

Early years

Weisenburger was born in Muskegon County, Michigan in August 1926. His father, Merle Weisenburger, was an Ohio native who worked as a laborer in a pattern shop. His mother, Ada Weisenburger, was a Michigan native. At the time of the 1930 United States Census, Weisenburger lived in Norton Shores, Michigan with his parents and two brothers, Robert (born c. 1923) and Kenneth (born c. 1929).[1] He attended Muskegon Heights High School where he played varsity football (three years), basketball (two years), baseball (four years), and track (one year). He was an all-conference basketball player and was selected as the class president in his sophomore, junior and senior years. The 1944 Muskegon Heights High School yearbook said of him, "Ferocious in football, and a good fellow always."[2]

University of Michigan

Weisenburger played college football as a halfback, fullback and quarterback at the University of Michigan from 1944 to 1947. He started five games at fullback for the 1944 Michigan Wolverines football team,[3] and played five games at fullback and one at halfback for the 1945 team.[4] In 1946, he started the season as a fullback, but suffered a broken jaw in an early game against Army.[5][6] Weisenburger ended up starting three games at quarterback and one each at fullback and halfback for the 1946 team.[7] As a senior, Weisenbuger was the starting fullback for the 1947 Michigan Wolverines football team that finished the season with a 10–0 record and outscored opponents 394 to 53.[8] The 1947 team became known as the "Mad Magicians" and is considered by some to be the greatest Michigan team of all time.[9] One sports writer referred to the 1947 backfield (Weisenbuger, Bob Chappuis and Bump Elliott) as "a backfield full of pervasive shadows that flit about like wraiths."[10] The 1947 Michigan team is also notable for head coach Fritz Crisler's innovation of modern platoon football; Weisenburger was one of two Michigan players in 1947 (the other was Bump Elliott) who played both offense and defense.[11] He finished his football career by scoring three touchdowns in the 1948 Rose Bowl against the USC Trojans.[12] He scored the game's first touchdown ten minutes into the game and added two more later in the game. He later recalled, "What astonished me was the ease with which our line opened holes for us. It was one of those days when everything clicked."[13] Michigan won the game 49 to 0.[8]

Weisenburger also played as an infielder for the Michigan Wolverines baseball team from 1945 to 1948. Weisenburger's contributions to the baseball team were described as follows:

"One of Michigan's outstanding all-around athletes, Jack Weisenburger, the spinning fullback of the Rose Bowl eleven, was equally at home on the Wolverine diamond. In his four year baseball career at Michigan, Weisenburger alternated between shortstop and the outfield. He led the Maize and Blue batting parade last season and will captain the squad during the 1948 campaign."[14]

Weisenburger was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity at Michigan.[15] He graduated from Michigan in 1948 with a degree in physical education.[16]

Professional baseball

Weisenburger was drafted by the Washington Redskins of the National Football League and the New York Yankees of the All-America Football Conference, but he opted instead to play professional baseball.[17] He played professional baseball from 1948 to 1952 for the Pawtucket Slaters (1948), Milwaukee Brewers (1949–1951), Denver Bears (1949), Evansville Braves (1951) and Tulsa Oilers (1952).[18][19] During his career, he played mostly as a third baseman, but also as an outfielder, second baseman and shortstop. He had his best season in 1950, when he played in 121 games for the Brewers and compiled a .404 slugging average with 20 doubles, 13 home runs, and 43 RBIs.[18]

Later years

After retiring from baseball, Weisenburger had a successful career in the insurance business at Mt. Pleasant, Michigan.[17] From 1948 to 1960, Weisenburger was also a registered official for high school athletics. During that time, he officiated at almost 150 high school football games and almost 600 basketball games.[20]

Weisenburger was inducted into the Muskegon Area Sports Hall of Fame in 1991.[17]

Weisenburger was inducted into the University of Michigan Hall of Honor in 1992. He passed away on March 25, 2019 at the age of 92 in Mount Pleasant. [21]

References

  1. ^ Census entry for Merle Weisenburger and family. Ancestry.com. 1930 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Norton Shores, Muskegon, Michigan; Roll: 1015; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 43; Image: 634.0.
  2. ^ 1944 Muskegon Heights High School yearbook, p. 63.
  3. ^ "1944 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library.
  4. ^ "1945 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library.
  5. ^ "Michigan Fullback Out With a Fractured Jaw". The New York Times. October 18, 1946.
  6. ^ "Michigan Loses Ace Back For Tilt With Northwestern". The Milwaukee Sentinel. October 18, 1946.
  7. ^ "1946 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library.
  8. ^ a b "1947 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library.
  9. ^ Jones, Todd (2007). "Michigan". In MacCambridge, Michael (ed.). ESPN Big Ten College Football Encyclopedia. ESPN Enterprises. ISBN 1-933060-49-2.
  10. ^ Cnockaert, p. 59.
  11. ^ "The Specialist". Time. 1947-11-03.
  12. ^ Harry Grayson (March 11, 1949). "Star College Gridders Hope to Prove Baseball Mixes With It". Warsaw Daily Times.
  13. ^ Jim Cnockaert. Michigan Wolverines: Colorful Tales of Maize and Blue. p. 72.
  14. ^ 1948 Michiganensian, p. 136.
  15. ^ 1948 Michiganensian, p. 250.
  16. ^ 1948 Michiganensian, p. 211.
  17. ^ a b c "Class of 1991". Muskegon Area Sports Hall of Fame.
  18. ^ a b "John Weisenburger". baseball-reference.com.
  19. ^ Sam Levy (April 11, 1949). "Jack Weisenburger Optioned to Brewers: Braves Send Former Michigan Athlete to Milwaukee on 24 Hour Recall Basis". The Milwaukee Journal.
  20. ^ "News from the Classes". The Michigan Alumnus, vol. 67. 1960. p. 256.
  21. ^ http://obits.mlive.com/obituaries/muskegon/obituary.aspx?n=john-e-weisenburger-jack&pid=191941032&fhid=13014
1944 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1944 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1944 Big Ten Conference football season. Under seventh-year head coach Fritz Crisler, Michigan compiled a record of 8–2 (5–2 Big Nine Conference), outscored opponents 204 to 91, finished in second place in the Big Nine Conference, and was ranked #8 in the final AP Poll. The team opened the season with a victory over an Iowa-Pre-Flight team that won all of its remaining games and ended the season ranked #6 in the final AP Poll. The Wolverines then shut out four opponents: Marquette (14-0); Northwestern (27-0); Illinois (14-0); and Wisconsin (14-0). The team's two losses came against Indiana and an undefeated Ohio State team that was ranked #2 in the final AP Poll.

Michigan's left tackle Milan Lazetich was selected by both the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) as a first-team player on the All-Big Ten Conference team and was also selected by multiple selectors as a second-team player on the 1944 College Football All-America Team. Two other players on the 1944 Michigan team were selected as first-team All-Big Ten players: quarterback Joe Ponsetto (AP) and fullback Bob Wiese (UP). Wiese also served as the team's captain, and fullback Don Lund received the team's Most Valuable Player award.

1945 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1945 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1945 Big Ten Conference football season. In their eighth year under head coach was Fritz Crisler, the Wolverines compiled a 7–3 record (5–1 Big Ten) and finished the season ranked #6 in the final Associated Press Poll. Quarterback Joe Ponsetto was the team captain, and center Harold Watts won the Most Valuable Player award and was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten Conference player.Michigan's three losses during the 1945 season came against teams ranked in the top four in the final AP Poll: #1 Army (28–7 loss at Yankee Stadium), #3 Navy (33–7 loss at Baltimore Stadium), and #4 Indiana (13–7 loss at Michigan Stadium). The Wolverines also defeated three ranked opponents in Illinois, Minnesota, and Ohio State. In their seven victories, the team registered three shutouts and outscored the teams 166 to 25, including margins of 40–0 and 26–0 in rivalry games against Michigan State and Minnesota.

1945 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1945 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1945 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 11th non-consecutive year under head coach Bernie Bierman (Bierman was not Minnesota's coach from 1942 to 1944), the Golden Gophers compiled a 4–5 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 177 to 55.Tackle Bob Fitch was awarded the team's MVP award.Total attendance for the season was 246,931, which averaged to 41,155. The season high for attendance was against Ohio State.

1946 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1946 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1946 Big Nine Conference football season. In their ninth year under head coach was Fritz Crisler, the Wolverines compiled a 6-2-1 record (5-1-1 Big Ten), outscored opponents 233 to 73, and finished the season in second place in the Big Nine Conference and ranked #6 in the final 1946 AP poll. The team's two losses came against an undefeated Army team that was ranked #2 in the final AP poll and against an Illinois team that won the Big Nine championship and was ranked #5 in the final AP poll. Michigan won its last four games by a combined score of 162 to 19, starting a 25-game winning streak that continued for nearly three years until October 8, 1949. In the final game of the 1946 season, Michigan defeated Ohio State 58-6, the Buckeyes' worst defeat since joining the conference in 1913.

Halfback Bob Chappuis passed for 735 yards, the most since Benny Friedman set the school record with 760 passing yards in 1925. Chappuis also rushed for 548 yards, received second-team All-American and first-team All-Big Nine honors, and was selected as Michigan's Most Valuable Player for the 1946 season.

The only Michigan player to receive first-team All-American honors in 1946 was end Elmer Madar. Center Jim Brieske was the team's leading scorer with 32 points having kicked 29 points after touchdown and one field goal. Bob Mann led the team in touchdowns with five. End Art Renner was the team captain.

1947 All-Big Nine Conference football team

The 1947 All-Big Nine Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Nine Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP) and the International News Service (INS) for the 1947 Big Nine Conference football season. The top vote getters in the AP voting by conference coaches were Leo Nomellini, Bob Chappuis, and Bump Elliott, each receiving 16 of 18 possible points.

1947 Big Nine Conference football season

The 1947 Big Nine Conference football season was the 52nd season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Nine Conference (also known as the Western Conference and the Big Ten Conference) and was a part of the 1947 college football season.

The 1947 Big Ten champion was Michigan. The Wolverines compiled a perfect 10–0 record, outscored its opponents by a combined total of 394 to 53, and defeated the USC Trojans by a score of 49 to 0 in the 1948 Rose Bowl game.

Michigan halfback Bob Chappuis led the conference with 1,395 yards of total offense, which was also the fourth best in the country. Chappuis also finished second in the voting for the 1947 Heisman Trophy, trailing Johnny Lujack by a tally of 742 votes to 555 votes, with both finishing ahead of Doak Walker and Bobby Layne.Wisconsin finished in second place in the conference, led by sophomore halfback Jug Girard. Girard, a triple-threat man who also returned two punts for touchdowns, was the first conference player selected in the 1948 NFL Draft, being chosen by the Green Bay Packers with the seventh pick in the first round.

1947 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1947 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1947 Big Nine Conference football season. In its tenth year under head coach Fritz Crisler, Michigan compiled a perfect 10–0 record, won the Big Ten Conference championship, and defeated the USC Trojans by a score of 49–0 in the 1948 Rose Bowl game. Although ranked second in the AP Poll at the end of the regular season, the Wolverines were selected as the nation's No. 1 team by a 226–119 margin over Notre Dame in an unprecedented (and unofficial) AP Poll taken after the bowl games. The 1947 team outscored its opponents, 394–53, and has been selected as the best team in the history of Michigan football.The 1947 Michigan Wolverines included five players who have been inducted into the College or Pro Football Halls of Fame: left halfback Bob Chappuis (who finished second in the 1947 Heisman Trophy voting), right halfback Bump Elliott (who received the Chicago Tribune trophy as the Big Ten MVP), defensive quarterback Pete Elliott, defensive end Len Ford, and tackle Al Wistert. Offensive tackle Bruce Hilkene was the team captain, and quarterback Howard Yerges was the field general who became known as "Crisler's 'second brain.'" Jack Weisenburger was the "spinning fullback" and the 1947 Big Ten rushing leader.

The 1947 Wolverines were the first team fully to embrace the concept of defensive and offensive specialization. Previously, most players had played their positions on both offense and defense. In 1947, Fritz Crisler established separate offensive and defensive squads. Only Bump Elliott and Jack Weisenberger played on both squads. In November 1947, Time magazine ran a feature article about the 1947 Wolverines focusing on the new era of specialization marked by Crisler's decision to field separate offensive and defensive units. The Time article noted: "Michigan's sleight-of-hand repertory is a baffling assortment of double reverses, buck-reverse laterals, crisscrosses, quick-hits and spins from seven different formations. Sometimes, watching from the side lines, even Coach Crisler isn't sure which Michigan man has the ball. Michigan plays one team on offense, one on defense...Whenever Michigan's defensive team regains the ball, Crisler orders: 'Offense unit, up and out,' and nine men pour onto the field at once." Crisler's single-wing formation in action was "so dazzling in its deception" that the media nicknamed the 1947 team the "Mad Magicians".

1947 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1947 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1947 Big Nine Conference football season. In their 13th year under head coach Bernie Bierman, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–3 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 174 to 127.Guard Leo Nomellini was named All-Big Ten. Guard Larry Olsonoski was awarded the Team MVP Award.Total attendance for the season was 289,612, which averaged to 57,922. The season high for attendance was against Purdue.

1948 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1948 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan during the 1948 Big Nine Conference football season. In its first year under head coach Bennie Oosterbaan, Michigan compiled a 9–0 record, defeated six ranked opponents by a combined score of 122–17, and won both the Big Nine Conference and national football championships. In the final AP Poll, Michigan received 192 first place votes, twice as many as second-place Notre Dame which garnered 97 first place votes.

The 1948 season was Michigan's second straight undefeated, untied season. After Fritz Crisler led the 1947 team to a perfect 10–0 record, the Wolverines entered the 1948 season with a 14-game winning streak dating back to October 1946. Despite the loss of all four backfield starters from the 1947 team (including Big Nine MVP Bump Elliott and Heisman Trophy runner-up Bob Chappuis), the 1948 team extended the winning streak to 23 games.

On offense, Michigan was led by a new backfield that included All-American quarterback Pete Elliott and halfbacks Chuck Ortmann and Leo Koceski. The team scored 252 points, an average of 28 points per game. With Ortmann as the principal passer, the Wolverines relied on an air attack, gaining more yards in the air (1,355) than on the ground (1,262). Dick Rifenburg, the team's leading receiver, was picked as a first-team All-American at the end position. Team captain Dominic Tomasi was selected as the team's Most Valuable Player. The 1949 Michiganensian wrote of the 250-pound guard, "Famous for his sharp shattering blocking, Dom tore huge gaps in the opposing lines to pave the way for Michigan's steam roller offense."On defense, the Wolverines allowed only 44 points, an average of 4.8 points per game. The defense was led by tackles Alvin Wistert and Al Wahl, center Dan Dworsky, and fullback Dick Kempthorn. Michigan gave up 935 passing yards and 851 rushing yards. The team shut out Oregon despite the passing game of College and Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Norm Van Brocklin. It also held ranked Purdue and Northwestern teams to 36 and 47 rushing yards, respectively. The defense forced a total of 32 turnovers (including 21 interceptions), an average of three-and-a-half turnovers per game.

1948 NFL Draft

The 1948 National Football League Draft was held on December 19, 1947, at the Fort Pitt Hotel in Pittsburgh.

1948 Rose Bowl

The 1948 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game played on January 1, 1948. It was the 34th Rose Bowl Game, and the second since the Big Nine Conference and the Pacific Coast Conference reached an exclusive agreement to match their champions in the game each year. In the game, the Michigan Wolverines defeated the USC Trojans; 49–0. Michigan halfback Bob Chappuis was named the Rose Bowl Player of The Game when the award was created in 1953 and selections were made retroactively.Michigan tied the record for the most points scored by a team in the Rose Bowl, first set by the 1901 Michigan Wolverines in the first Rose Bowl and later matched by USC in 2008. Oregon supplanted the record in 2015. Michigan also tied the game's record for largest margin of victory also set by the 1901 Michigan team that defeated Stanford by an identical 49–0 score. The record of seven PATs converted by Michigan kicker Jim Brieske remains unbroken, but was tied in 2008 by USC's David Buehler.

The game was aired by local station KTLA in the first telecast of a bowl game in the Greater Los Angeles Area. It was also the first time a U.S. motion picture newsreel was taken in color. In a special AP Poll following the game, Michigan replaced Notre Dame as the 1947 national champion by a vote of 226 to 119.

1948 in Michigan

Events from the year 1948 in Michigan.

2017 Virginia Attorney General election

The Virginia Attorney General election of 2017 was held on November 7, 2017. The incumbent attorney general, Democrat Mark Herring, was expected to run for governor, but announced he will run for re-election instead. As only Herring and Republican John Adams qualified for their respective party primaries, the two automatically became their parties' nominees. In the general election, Herring defeated Adams to win a second term as Attorney General of Virginia.

Bob Mann (American football)

Robert Mann (April 8, 1924 – October 21, 2006) was an American football end. A native of New Bern, North Carolina, Mann played college football at Hampton Institute in 1942 and 1943 and at the University of Michigan in 1944, 1946 and 1947. He broke the Big Ten Conference record for receiving yardage in 1946 and again in 1947. Mann later played professional football in the National Football League (NFL) for the Detroit Lions (1948–1949) and Green Bay Packers (1950–1954). He was the first African American player for both teams.

Mann led the NFL in receiving yardage (1,014 yards) and yards per reception (15.4) in 1949. Mann was asked to take a pay cut after the 1949 season and became a "holdout" when the Lions opened practice in July 1950. He was traded to the New York Yankees in August 1950 and released three weeks later. Mann charged that he had been "railroaded" out of professional football for refusing to take a pay cut. He signed with the Green Bay Packers near the end of the 1950 NFL season and was the Packers' leading receiver in 1951. He remained with the Packers through the 1954 season. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1988.

After his football career, Mann became a lawyer and practiced law in Detroit.

Bump Elliott

Chalmers William "Bump" Elliott (born January 30, 1925) is a former American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He played halfback at Purdue University (1943–1944) and the University of Michigan (1946–1947). Elliott grew up in Bloomington, Illinois, enlisted in the United States Marine Corps as a senior in high school and was assigned to the V-12 Navy College Training Program at Purdue University. He received varsity letters in football, baseball, and basketball at Purdue, before being called into active duty in late 1944, serving with the Marines in China.

After being discharged from the military, he enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1946 and joined the football team for whom his brother Pete Elliott played quarterback. In 1947, he played for an undefeated and untied Michigan football team known as the "Mad Magicians", led the Big Nine Conference in scoring, won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Most Valuable Player in the Conference, and was selected as an All-American by the American Football Coaches Association.

After graduating from Michigan in 1948, Elliott spent ten years as an assistant football coach at Oregon State, Iowa, and Michigan. He was appointed as Michigan's head football coach in 1959 and held that position until 1968, leading the team to a Big Ten Conference championship and Rose Bowl victory in the 1964 season. For a period of 21 years, from 1970 to 1991, he was the athletic director at the University of Iowa. During his tenure as athletic director, he hired coaches Dan Gable, Hayden Fry, Lute Olson, C. Vivian Stringer, and Dr. Tom Davis, and the Iowa Hawkeyes won 41 Big Ten Conference championships and 11 NCAA titles. In 1989, Elliott was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

History of Michigan Wolverines football in the Crisler years

The History of Michigan Wolverines football in the Crisler years covers the history of the University of Michigan Wolverines football program during the period from the hiring of Fritz Crisler as head coach in 1938 through his retirement as head coach after winning the 1948 Rose Bowl. Michigan was a member of the Big Ten Conference during the Crisler years and played its home games at Michigan Stadium.

During the 10 years in which Crisler served as head football coach, Michigan compiled a record of 71–16–3 (.806). Tom Harmon played for the Wolverines from 1938 to 1940 and in 1940 became the first Michigan player to win the Heisman Trophy. 1947 Michigan team, sometimes known as the "Mad Magicians", compiled a perfect 10–0 record, outscored its opponents 394–53, defeated the USC Trojans 49–0 in the 1948 Rose Bowl game, and were selected as the nation's No. 1 team by a 226–119 margin over Notre Dame in an unprecedented AP Poll taken after the bowl games. Bob Chappuis finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting in 1947.

Ten players from the Crisler years have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. They are Chappuis, Bump Elliott, Pete Elliott, Harmon, Elroy "Crazy Legs" Hirsch, David M. Nelson (inducted as coach), Tubby Raymond (inducted as coach), and Bob Westfall, Albert "Ox" Wistert, and Alvin "Moose" Wistert. Two have also been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame—Hirsch and Len Ford. Three members of the coaching staff have also been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. They are Crisler, Clarence "Biggie" Munn, and Bennie Oosterbaan (inducted as player).

List of Michigan Wolverines in the NFL draft

This is a list of Michigan Wolverines football players in the NFL Draft.

Michigan Wolverines baseball

The Michigan Wolverines baseball team represents the University of Michigan in NCAA Division I college baseball. Along with most other Michigan athletic teams, the baseball team participates in the Big Ten Conference. They play their home games at Ray Fisher Stadium.

The Wolverines have made the College World Series seven times, winning two national championships in 1953 and 1962. Michigan is the fourth winningest program in NCAA Division I baseball history, trailing only Fordham, Texas and USC.

Prior to the 2013 season, former Maryland head coach Erik Bakich replaced Rich Maloney as the program's head coach.

Weisenburger

Weisenburger is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Edward Weisenburger (born 1960), American Roman Catholic bishop

Jack Weisenburger (born 1926), American football and baseball player

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