Jack Pfiester

John Albert Pfiester (May 24, 1878 – September 3, 1953), was a professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1903 to 1911.

Pfiester was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. In his rookie season in 1906, Pfiester finished with a 1.51 ERA (one of the best rookie seasons by any pitcher ever), and he went on to finish with a 1.15 ERA in 1907. His career ERA was 2.02, the 3rd lowest among pitchers with 1,000+ innings thrown, and he had a .617 winning percentage. On September 23, 1908 against the New York Giants he pitched a complete game (which involved Giant first baseman Fred Merkle’s infamous boner, which resulted in the game ending in a tie), allowing five hits, all with a dislocated tendon in his pitching forearm. He had to be assisted off the field a few times after throwing curve balls. As soon as the game ended he went to Ohio to be treated, and his tendon was snapped back into place by trainer Bonesetter Reese.

Although Bonesetter got Pfiester throwing again, it would prove to be only a matter of time before the wear and tear got to Pfiester. In 1909, Pfiester posted 17 wins and a 2.43 ERA in his last full season. Over the next two years he would make 20 more appearances as a major league pitcher, and by the age of 33 he was done. After Pfiester's playing career ended, he and his wife settled in Ohio with their son, Jack Jr. Pfiester died in Loveland, Ohio, at the age of 75.[1]

Pfiester was the starting pitcher for the Chicago Cubs in Game 3 of the 1908 World Series, the team's last championship until 2016. He was also the winning pitcher of Game 2 of the 1907 World Series.

Jack Pfiester
Jack Pfiester baseball card
Pitcher
Born: May 24, 1878
Cincinnati, Ohio
Died: October 3, 1953 (aged 75)
Loveland, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 8, 1903, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
May 10, 1911, for the Chicago Cubs
MLB statistics
Win–loss record71–44
Earned run average2.02
Strikeouts503
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ "Jack Pfiester Stats". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 2007-04-06.

External links

West Side Park 1906 World Series
Pfiester in game 3 of the 1906 World Series.
1878 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1878 throughout the world.

1903 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1903 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 22nd year the Pittsburgh Pirates played in Major League Baseball. The club finished their season as National League champions, beating the second-place New York Giants by 6½ games. They went on to participate in the 1903 World Series, the first to be played between the champions of the National League and American League. The Pirates started off well, winning 3 of the first four games, but the Boston Americans won the last four straight to win the series five games to three. The Pirates set a record of 52 consecutive innings without allowing the opposing team to score a run, a record that still stands today.

1904 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1904 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 23rd season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 18th in the National League. The Pirates finished fourth in the National League with a record of 87–66.

1906 Chicago Cubs season

The 1906 Chicago Cubs season was the 35th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 31st in the National League and the 14th at West Side Park. The team won the National League pennant with a record of 116–36, a full 20 games ahead of the second-place New York Giants. The team's .763 winning percentage, with two ties in their 154-game season, is the highest in modern MLB history. The 2001 Seattle Mariners also won 116 games, but they did that in 162 games with a .716 winning percentage.

In a major upset, the Cubs were beaten by the Chicago White Sox in the 1906 World Series.

1906 Major League Baseball season

The 1906 Major League Baseball season.

1906 World Series

The 1906 World Series featured a crosstown matchup between the Chicago Cubs, who had posted the highest regular-season win total (116) and winning percentage (.763) in the major leagues since the advent of the 154-game season; and the Chicago White Sox. The White Sox, known as the "Hitless Wonders" after finishing with the worst team batting average (.230) in the American League, beat the Cubs in six games for one of the greatest upsets in Series history. This was the first World Series played by two teams from the same metropolitan area.

The teams split the first four games; then the Hitless Wonders (a name coined by sportswriter Charles Dryden) exploded for 26 hits in the last two games. True to their nickname, the White Sox hit only .198 as a team in winning the series but it beat the .196 average produced by the Cubs.

In Game 3, Ed Walsh struck out 12 Cubs, breaking the previous record of 11 set by Bill Dinneen in 1903.

The 1906 Series was the first to be played between two teams from the same city. To date, it remains the only World Series played between the two Chicago teams (In fact, it would be another 102 years before both Chicago teams would qualify for the playoffs during the same season, as this was next accomplished in 2008), and one of only two Series (the other being the 1944 World Series) played outside New York City that featured two teams from the same city (although the 1989 World Series was played between the San Francisco Giants and the Oakland Athletics, which are roughly 10 miles apart). This is also the most recent World Series where both teams were making their first appearance in the Fall Classic.

1907 Chicago Cubs season

The 1907 Chicago Cubs season was the 36th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 32nd in the National League and the 15th at West Side Park. It was the first season that the Chicago Cubs became the franchise's name officially. The team finished in first place in the National League with a record of 107–45, 17 games ahead of the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was their second straight NL pennant. The Cubs faced the Detroit Tigers in the 1907 World Series, which they won four games to none (with one tie) for their first World Series victory.

1907 World Series

The 1907 World Series featured the Chicago Cubs and the Detroit Tigers, with the Cubs winning the Series four games to none (with one tie) for their first championship.

The Cubs came back strong from their shocking loss in the 1906 World Series. The Tigers' young star Ty Cobb came into the Series with the first of his many league batting championships. With pitching dominance over the Tigers and Cobb, the Cubs allowed only three runs in the four games they won, while stealing 18 bases off the rattled Tigers.

Tigers pitcher "Wild Bill" Donovan struck out twelve Cubs in Game 1. Although that matched Ed Walsh's total in Game 3 against the Cubs in 1906, it was across twelve innings. Donovan struck out just ten Cubs in the first nine innings of the game.

1908 Chicago Cubs season

The 1908 Chicago Cubs season was the 37th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 33rd in the National League and the 16th at West Side Park. It involved the Cubs winning their third consecutive National League pennant, as well as the World Series.

This team included four future Hall of Famers: manager / first baseman Frank Chance, second baseman Johnny Evers, shortstop Joe Tinker, and pitcher Mordecai Brown. In 1908, Brown finished second in the NL in wins and ERA. This would be the last World Series victory for the Cubs until the 2016 World Series.

1909 Chicago Cubs season

The 1909 Chicago Cubs season was the 38th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 34th in the National League and the 17th at West Side Park. The Cubs won 104 games but finished second in the National League, 6½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Cubs had won the pennant the previous three years and would win it again in 1910. Of their 104 victories, 97 were wins for a Cubs starting pitcher; this was the most wins in a season by the starting staff of any major league team from 1908 to the present day.The legendary infield of Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, Frank Chance, and Harry Steinfeldt was still intact, but it was the pitching staff that excelled. The Cubs pitchers had a collective earned run average of 1.75, a microscopic figure even for the dead-ball era. Three Finger Brown was one of the top two pitchers in the league (with Christy Mathewson) again, going 27–9 with a 1.31 ERA.

1910 Chicago Cubs season

The 1910 Chicago Cubs season was the 39th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 35th in the National League and the 18th at West Side Park. The Cubs finished first in the National League with a record of 104–50, 13 games ahead of the second place New York Giants. The team was defeated four games to one by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1910 World Series.

1911 Chicago Cubs season

The 1911 Chicago Cubs season was the 40th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 36th in the National League and the 19th at West Side Park. The Cubs finished second in the National League with a record of 92–62.

Earned run average

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the average of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and omitted from ERA calculations.

Ed Hahn

William Edgar Hahn (August 27, 1875 – November 29, 1941) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball from 1905 to 1910. He played for the Chicago White Sox and New York Highlanders.

List of Chicago Cubs team records

The following lists statistical records and all-time leaders as well as awards and major accomplishments for the Chicago Cubs professional baseball club of Major League Baseball. The records list the top 5 players in each category since the inception of the Cubs.

Players that are still active with the Cubs are denoted in bold.

Records updated as of August 5, 2011.

List of Major League Baseball career ERA leaders

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched (i.e. the traditional length of a game). It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors (including pitchers' defensive errors) are recorded as unearned runs and are not used to determine ERA.

This is a list of the top 100 players in career earned run average, who have thrown at least 1,000 innings.

Ed Walsh holds the MLB earned run average record with a 1.816. Addie Joss (1.887) and Jim Devlin (1.896) are the only other pitchers with a career earned run average under 2.000.

List of Major League Baseball career WHIP leaders

In baseball statistics, walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) is a sabermetric measurement of the number of baserunners a pitcher has allowed per inning pitched. WHIP reflects a pitcher's propensity for allowing batters to reach base, therefore a lower WHIP indicates better performance. WHIP is calculated by adding the number of walks and hits allowed and dividing this sum by the number of innings pitched.

Below is the list of the top 100 Major League Baseball pitchers in Walks plus hits per inning pitched (WHIP) with at least 1,000 innings pitched.

Addie Joss is the all-time leader with a career WHIP of 0.9678. Ed Walsh (0.9996) is the only other player with a career WHIP under 1.0000.

Sioux City Packers

The Sioux City Packers was the primary name of the minor league baseball team based in Sioux City, Iowa playing in various seasons between 1888 and 1960.

Solly Hofman

Arthur Frederick "Solly" Hofman (October 29, 1882 – March 10, 1956) was a Major League Baseball player from 1903 to 1916. He played the majority of his 1,194 professional games in the outfield.

His nickname was "Circus Solly". Some attribute this name to a comic strip of the era, while others attribute it to spectacular catches while fielding.In the 1906 World Series, Hofman batted leadoff and played center field for the Chicago Cubs against their crosstown rivals, the Chicago White Sox. He had seven hits and three walks during the Series, batting .304.

Hofman also was the Cubs' center fielder on Oct. 14, 1908 when they defeated the Detroit Tigers 2-0 to win the 1908 World Series. He hit .316 for the Series. It was the Cubs' last championship until 2016.

He is considered by some to be the first great utility player in baseball due to his versatility.In 1,194 games over 14 seasons, Hofman compiled a .269 batting average (1095-for-4072) with 554 runs, 162 doubles, 60 triples, 19 home runs, 498 RBI, 208 stolen bases, 421 base on balls, 323 strikeouts, .340 on-base percentage and .352 slugging percentage. Defensively, he recorded a .966 fielding percentage at all positions except catcher. In three World Series covering 16 games (1906, '08, '10), he batted .298 (17-for-57) with 7 runs, 8 RBI and 3 stolen bases.

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